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Meet Martha Washington

Although she famously burned all but two of the letters from her husband George, Martha Custis Washington amassed a correspondence that is sizable, articulate, and—as it reached out to numerous people in Virginia and beyond—a fascinating window on colonial America and the post-Revolutionary republic. As the Washington Post reports, Martha's letters will now be added to the ongoing Papers of George Washington project


Glad We Could Help

Awhile back we got an unusual request for temporary access to The Dolley Madison Digital Edition. This is one of the databases in our American Founding Era collection, published by our electronic imprint, Rotunda. Usually such requests come from large research libraries wanting to trial a resource before acquiring it. In this case, however, the users would be three sixth-grade students in Fayetteville, Arkansas.


Tadjo at World Voices Festival

Véronique Tadjo, author of Far From My Father, will be taking part in PEN America's World Voices Festival in New York City on May 7. Tickets are free, but you must reserve a spot. Details are here.


All Things to All People

No Founding Father has as a greater public following than Thomas Jefferson. Embraced for over two centuries by everyone from abolitionists to laissez-faire capitalists, from atheists to evangelicals, Jefferson speaks to people in a way that somehow transcends class or race or political affiliation. But when the agendas of his followers range so widely, is it inevitable that many must be misinterpreting his beliefs? Jefferson scholar Andrew Burstein shares the long history of appropriating Jefferson, a practice that even presidents are not above, in his new book, Democracy's Muse: How Thomas Jefferson Became an FDR Liberal, a Reagan Republican, and a Tea Party Fanatic, All While Being Dead. Professor Burstein agreed to answer some of our questions about his provocative book and what it reveals about both the third president and the generations that have followed him.


Today's Jefferson

It is the week of Thomas Jefferson's birthday, and everyone wishes him a happy birthday. No, really—literally everyone. Currently on Salon, historian Andrew Burstein looks at the appropriation of Jefferson by both left and right, in particular the adoption of this founder of the Democratic Party by the modern-day Tea Party movement. This is just one of the apparent contradictions Burstein explores in his provocative new book, Democracy's Muse: How Thomas Jefferson Became an FDR Liberal, a Reagan Republican, and a Tea Party Fanatic, All While Being Dead.


And So It Ends

The South we inhabit today began with Lee's surrender to Grant at Appomattox. The formal end to the Civil War, it definitively brought the antebellum era to its close. On the 150th anniversary of this historic meeting, we look back at the war's beginning with Brent Tarter's new book, Daydreams and Nightmares: A Virginia Family Faces Secession and War, a devastating look at the personal cost of the war. The scene of the war's conclusion provides a fascinating entry in Anne Carter Lee's Buildings of Virginia: Valley, Piedmont, Southside, and Southwest, the latest addition to the Buildings of the United States series.


Virginia Festival of the Book

For one week each spring the Virginia Festival of the Book turns Charlottesville into a mecca for book lovers. This year's gathering—set to kick off Wednesday, March 18—brings together literally hundreds of writers, including, as usual, many UVA Press authors. We're posting a list of our authors' events below. You can find a complete list of events at the festival web site.


Assia Djebar, 1936-2015

The Algerian novelist and filmmaker Assia Djebar has passed away at the age of 78. A perennial Nobel contender, Djebar was the first Algerian, and only the fifth woman, to be voted into the Académie Française, France's most prestigious literary institution. As the publishers of her novel Women of Algiers in Their Apartment, we can testify to the never-flagging fascination with this pioneering artist.


From a Cottage to a College

To celebrate Black History Month, we are turning to an under-reported but historically and aesthetically rich story—the African American architectural heritage in Virginia. Some sites are notable for being designed by African Americans; others for the roles they played in black history, from Booker T. Washington's birthplace to Moton High School, scene of a student strike that led to Brown v. Board of Education. Following are entries from the just-published Buildings of Virginia: Valley, Piedmont, Southside, and Southwest by Anne Carter Lee and a team of coauthors.


The Page 99 Test

Ford Madox Ford said, "Open the book to page ninety-nine and read, and the quality of the whole will be revealed to you." Tom Chaffin, author of Giant's Causeway: Frederick Douglass's Irish Oddysey and the Making of an American Visionary, was invited to put his book to the test.


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