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WATCH: Trailer for Chasing Shadows

This summer marks the forty-year anniversary of Richard Nixon's resignation as president. This singular event is now far enough away from us to feel like a finished chapter in our history. After all this time, however, there is still much about Nixon's downfall that is not widely understood. If anything, the story continues to deepen.

On July 29, we will release Ken Hughes's new book, Chasing Shadows: The Nixon Tapes, the Chennault Affair, and the Origins of Watergate. Bob Woodward calls Hughes "one of American's foremost experts on secret presidential recordings," and in Chasing Shadows Hughes draws from his unprecedented access to the tapes of both Nixon and Lyndon Johnson to show how the Watergate break-in was part of a larger pattern of behavior, stretching back to the 1968 presidential campaign. The trailer for the book is online now.


Buildings of Michigan Honored

Congratulations to Kathryn Eckert, whose revised edition of Buildings of Michigan was selected by the Michigan Architectural Foundation as part of Rae Dumke Collection of 100 Essential Architecture Books.


Living Wright

To commemorate Frank Lloyd Wright's 147th birthday, we are happy to highlight two forthcoming volumes: Frank Lloyd Wright's Pope-Leighey House by Steven M. Reiss and Frank Lloyd Wright: Preservation, Design, and Adding to Iconic Buildings edited by Richard Longstreth.

The first volume, which recounts the history of one of Wright's early Usonian houses, is at heart a tale of four people: Loren and Charlotte Pope, who approached Wright about designing a home for their family, and Marjorie and Robert Leighey, who purchased the house from the Popes and deeded the property to the National Trust to save it from demolition.

Loren Pope described the house with these words in his article "The Love Affair of a Man and His House," published by House Beautiful in August 1948: "Ours is a big small house for a small family. It is L-shaped, one-story on two levels because the lot slopes, with living room eleven-and-a-half feet high, and a red-colored concrete floor. For light, ventilation, and decoration this house has a patterned ribbon of clerestory windows between the top of the wall and the ceiling. The only support for the roof where they ran was a strut the size of your wrist placed every four feet, the width of a window unit. You can sit by the fireplace at night and see the stars. It has rows of plate glass doors from floor to ceiling where an ordinary house has a single window. Where these doors meet a corner, there is no corner post, the room just opens into the outdoors.


Nash in Washington Post

Stephen Nash, author of the forthcoming Virginia Climate Fever: How Global Warming Will Transform our Cities, Shorelines and Forests, has an op-ed piece in today's Washington Post. Nash provides the facts about climate change as it relates to Virginia to emphasize the urgent need for the state legislature's GOP majority to change its mindset.


Greens Crazy in Italy

It had been a few months since we heard from Jeffrey Greene, an American scholar living in France and author of the much-loved Golden-Bristled Boar. As he researches his next book, on wild edibles, Jeff has contributed several superb pieces to our blog (like this...or this), and now he is back with a story posted from Liguria and its surprisingly edible countryside.


A Storied Building

To commemorate the 60th anniversary of the landmark Brown v. Board of Education decision, we're pleased to present one of the many entries focusing on civil rights from the forthcoming Buildings of Virginia: Valley, Piedmont, Southside, and Southwest volume, the Robert Rossa Moton Museum, originally Moton High School, in Prince Edward County.


Spring in Virginia

Winter took a long time this year to loosen its grip—only five or six weeks ago we were shoveling snow—but we are currently enjoying a spectacular spring in Virginia. While this perfection lasts, we wanted to get some thoughts on spring in the Commonwealth from Ben Greenberg, photographer and author of Natural Virginia, a collection of his stunning panoramic photography.


Ritvo on Counting Sheep

Readers who enjoyed Nobel Cows and Hybrid Zebras by Harret Ritvo, the pioneering scholar in animals studies, will want to watch the video interview just posted on the Faculti web site. In it, Ritvo discusses the creation of this book and goes into fascinating detail about one of the essays collected in the book, "Counting Sheep in the English Lake District."


Preservation Award to Buildings of Vermont

Glenn Andres and Curtis Johnson have received a Preservation Award from the Preservation Trust of Vermont for their work on the recently published Buildings of Vermont volume.


Dolley Madison: The Fame Years

Rotunda's Dolley Madison Digital Edition, edited by Holly C. Shulman, has been updated with 158 new documents, 543 new and revised identifications of people, places, and terms, and two new editorial essays.


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