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We are remembering Bernard Mayes, who passed away on October 23 at the age of 85 after one of the most engaged lives imaginable.

One hundred and fifty years ago, on October 19, 1864, a band of Confederate raiders attacked the small Vermont town of St. Albans in Franklin County. To mark the anniversary, we're pleased to post the historic overview of the city and its architecture, together with one of the associated building entries, drawn from the award-winning Buildings of Vermont volume by Glenn Andres and Curtis Johnson and from SAH Archipedia.

James Salter, one of the last men standing from the grand postwar era of American novelists, is the first Kapnick Distinguished Writer-in-Residence at the University of Virginia. What this means for fiction fans in the Charlottesville area is three opportunities in October to see Salter speak on the craft of writing. The first lecture will be Thursday, October 9.

The 75th anniversary of Frank Lloyd Wright's Pope-Leighy House, one of the famed architect's few works in Virginia, will be celebrated at Woodlawn Mansion in Alexandria on Sunday, September 28. Steven Reiss, author of the new Frank Lloyd Wright's Pope-Leighy House, will read from the book and answer questions.

President Lincoln had to move deftly even within his own party to formulate, and finally push through, his Emancipation Proclamation. Salon is featuring an excerpt from Paul Escott's new book, Lincoln's Dilemma, that provides an inside look at the fascinating political maneuverings

Lynn Rainville, author of Hidden History: African American Cemeteries in Central Virginia, has upcoming talks at the Nelson County Heritage Center (September 21, details here) and at the Scottsville Historical Society and Museum (September 27, details TBA). An entire schedule of events may be found at her web site.

In a decade often accused of being anticlimactic, Watergate was the Seventies' uncontested contribution to milestone history. There is nothing small, ephemeral, or, heaven knows, anticlimactic about the scandal that brought down President Nixon—and, with him, a whole post-war era of politics. This was high tragedy.

On this, the fortieth anniversary of the historic resignation, there is much chatter about those days. Some commentators attempt to place Nixon's entire administration into a broad (you might say massive) historical context; others seek to titillate by exposing Nixon's seemingly endless moments of pettiness and paranoia. With Chasing Shadows: The Nixon Tapes, the Chennault Affair, and the Origins of Watergate, Ken Hughes, whom Bob Woodward calls "one of America's foremost experts on secret presidential recordings," turns to the White House tapes to offer a clear narrative about the pattern of covert activity that not only brought Nixon down but which reveals something essential about his character and why his acts still resonate so strongly.

strong>Ken Hughes, author of Chasing Shadows: The Nixon Tapes, the Chennault Affair, and the Origins of Watergate, took part in a special event last night, hosted by the Washington Post, which included Elizabeth Drew and reunited Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein. With the  fortieth anniversary of the Nixon resignation rolling around this week, the panel revisited the heady days of the Watergate break-in and its following cover-up and also attempted to place those events in a contemporary context.

The Globe and Mail has run a fascinating profile of pioneering landscape architect Cornelia Hahn Oberlander. She and her family fled Nazi Germany in 1931; Oberlander went on to graduate from Harvard and during a long, remarkable career advocated for a landscape architecture that worked with its environment.

On a June afternoon in 1971, President Nixon and three of  his top aides—H.R. Haldeman, Henry Kissinger, and John Erlichman—discussed the possibility of exposing Lyndon Johnson's bombing halt of 1968 as a political ploy to help his own party's candidate, Vice President Hubert Humphrey. It's one thing to accuse someone of something; what's required is proof. The idea is floated that a file documenting this alleged abuse of power might exist at the Brookings Institute. Nixon promptly orders a break-in to retrieve the file. "Blow the safe and get it," he says—not your typical Oval Office talk. As Ken Hughes shows in Chasing Shadows: The Nixon Tapes, the Chennault Affair, and the Origins of Watergate, this conversation is fascinating in almost too many ways to count.

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