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Art and Architecture


Buildings of Virginia

Anne Carter Lee. With Contributors

Virginia is as much a state of mind as a set of geographical boundaries. Its western terrain encompasses dramatically beautiful mountaintops and scrubby lowlands, luxuriantly rich terrain, and rocky, almost untillable land. The green forests, rich loam, red clay, and sandy soil attracted waves of... More


Frank Lloyd Wright

Edited by Richard Longstreth

The buildings of Frank Lloyd Wright are not immune to the social and environmental forces that affect all architecture. Because of the popular recognition and historical significance of his work, however, the stakes are unusually high when his buildings are modified in any way. Any additions or... More


Frank Lloyd Wright's Pope-Leighey House

Steven M. Reiss

Frank Lloyd Wright designed and realized over 500 buildings between 1886 and 1959 for a wide range of clients. In Frank Lloyd Wright's Pope-Leighey House, architect Steven M. Reiss presents the updated and detailed story of one of Wright’s few Virginia commissions. Designed and built for Loren and... More


After the Deluge

Edited by Kim Tanzer

After the Deluge serves as a demonstration of the practical imagination applied to the ecology of water. Taking Leonardo da Vinci’s "deluge" drawings of catastrophic floods as its starting point, and inspired by his lifelong study of all aspects of water, the dialogues in this book gather together... More


Architecture as Medicine

Reuben M. Rainey and Alana K. Schrader

Rainey and Schrader explore an innovative University of Florida cancer hospital, focusing on its many patient-centered design features as well as the sophisticated planning process and construction management strategy involved in its realization. This generously illustrated volume will interest... More


Drone Art

John Vigour

The wide-angle aerial photographs collected here display the Commonwealth’s beauty as never seen before. Shot using a camera on a bird-sized model helicopter, these panoramic views are remarkable mosaics that reveal new details and spatial relationships in the Grounds of the University of Virginia... More


Natural Virginia

Ben Greenberg

A century ago, legendary photographer Edward Curtis set about to capture the traditional world of Native Americans before that world vanished. Now, Ben Greenberg has done the same for the natural areas of Virginia. Devoted to preserving and celebrating Virginia’s diverse but sometimes threatened... More


Buildings of Vermont

Glenn M. Andres and Curtis B. Johnson

Most picture Vermont with handsome barns overlooking rolling pastures, white country churches punctuating hillsides of blazing maples, and small villages clustered around gracious greens. While not inaccurate, this image does little justice to the architectural richness of a state that retains so... More


Catching Sight

Mitchell Merling. With Malcolm Cormack and Corey Piper

This collection sheds new light on a common but often overlooked contribution of British art: the sporting print. Highly sought after during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, these prints endure today as vivid, direct, and even witty symbols of English culture. Catching Sight features more... More


The Cabinetmaker and the Carver

Gerald W. R. Ward

For centuries Boston has been one of the most important furniture-making centers in America. Soon after the town’s founding in 1630, Boston’s joiners and turners were the first craftsmen to make furniture in British North America, and the city’s cabinetmakers contributed to the art and craft of... More


"The Most Segregated City in America"

Charles E. Connerly

One of Planetizen’s Top Ten Books of 2006"But for Birmingham," Fred Shuttleworth recalled President John F. Kennedy saying in June 1963 when he invited black leaders to meet with him, "we would not be here today." Birmingham is well known for its civil rights history, particularly for the violent... More


Visuality for Architects

Branko Mitrovic

What is more important in architectural works—their form, shape, and color, or the meanings and symbolism that can be associated with them? Can aesthetic judgments of architecture be independent of the stories one can tell about buildings? Do non-architects perceive buildings in the same way as do... More


One Shot

Vanessa Thaxton-Ward

As one of the oldest historically black college campuses in America, Hampton University (formerly Hampton Institute) has hosted many of the most important African American intellectuals, statesmen, and artists of modern times. Witnessing it all has been Reuben Burrell, who has served as campus... More


In Death Lamented

Sarah Nehama. Foreword by Anne E. Bentley

In Death Lamented: The Tradition of Anglo-American Mourning Jewelry illustrates and explains prime examples of rings, bracelets, brooches, and other pieces of mourning jewelry from the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. Like the exhibition at the Massachusetts Historical Society,... More


Buildings of Michigan

Kathryn Bishop Eckert

This revised edition of Buildings of Michigan (first published in 1993) presents the architecture of the Upper and Lower peninsulas of Michigan, which are surrounded by four of the Great Lakes. From the Greek, Gothic, Italianate, Queen Anne, and Richardsonian Romanesque structures of the nineteenth... More


Sustainable, Affordable, Prefab

John D. Quale

Sustainable Affordable Prefab combines architectural theory and practice in a beautifully illustrated account of ecoMOD, the innovative design/build program pioneered by John Quale. Unlike most manifestos of green design, Quale's book describes a collaborative process that has produced, to date,... More


Monticello in Measured Drawings

William L. Beiswanger. Foreword by Leslie Greene Bowman

Each year approximately 500,000 people journey up the winding, narrow road from Charlottesville, Virginia, to visit Monticello, the home of Thomas Jefferson. In 1990 a team of architects from the Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS) made this same journey to record Jefferson's residence inside... More


Thomas Jefferson's Architectural Drawings

Frederick Doveton Nichols

[Book description not available]


Essays in Early American Architectural History

Carl R. Lounsbury

The essays in this collection represent the type of research that has reshaped our understanding of early American architecture over the past thirty years. Carl R. Lounsbury, three-time winner of the prestigious Abbott Lowell Cummings Award offered by the Vernacular Architecture Forum, traces the... More


Xu Bing

John B. Ravenal, Wu Hung, Lydia Liu, and Edward Melillo. Edited by Reiko Tomii

Born in Chongqing, China, in 1955, Xu Bing is considered one of the most important artists of his generation. Between 1977 and 1987, he studied and taught at the Central Academy of Fine Arts, Beijing. He moved to the United States in 1990 and in 1999 received a MacArthur Fellowship, the celebrated... More


Florence

Andrea Ponsi

Many years have passed since architect Andrea Ponsi settled in Florence, and still he feels he does not fully comprehend this mysterious city. The way Florence eludes understanding, however, can be an opportunity--to keep seeking, to keep exploring. Ponsi’s Florence is endlessly suggestive. His... More


At Home with Apartheid

Rebecca Ginsburg

Despite their peaceful, bucolic appearance, the tree-lined streets of South African suburbia were no refuge from the racial tensions and indignities of apartheid’s most repressive years. In At Home with Apartheid, Rebecca Ginsburg provides an intimate examination of the cultural landscapes of... More


The Sight of Silence

Ray Kass

Best known as an experimental composer and performer, John Cage (1912–1992) was also an active visual artist who created an extensive body of prints, drawings, and watercolors over the last twenty years of his life. The Sight of Silence: John Cage’s Complete Watercolors provides the first... More


Buildings of Hawaii

Don J. Hibbard

With elegance and authority, Buildings of Hawaii presents the architecture of the six major islands in the Hawaii chain. Don J. Hibbard delves into the development of the state’s distinct blending of the building traditions of the East and West within a subtropical island context. The first in-... More


Buildings of Pennsylvania

George E. Thomas. with Patricia Ricci, J. Bruce Thomas, Robert Janosov, Larry Newman, and Richard J. Webster

This latest volume in the Society of Architectural Historians’ Buildings of the United States series follows the Pennsylvania migration narrative in broad swathes: Philadelphia and its surrounding counties of the original Quaker settlement zone, the Piedmont and the German agricultural zone, the... More


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