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Environmental Studies


Historic Virginia Gardens

Margaret Page Bemiss. Photography by Roger Foley

For more than seventy-five years, The Garden Club of Virginia has undertaken garden research and preservation work at numerous historic sites across the Old Dominion, restoring and creating beautiful landscapes for the education and enjoyment of all, from backyard gardeners to design professionals... More


City Trees

Henry W. Lawrence

For those who have ever wondered why we have trees in cities or what makes the layout of cities like Paris and Amsterdam seem so memorable, City Trees: A Historical Geography from the Renaissance through the Nineteenth Century by Henry W. Lawrence provides a comprehensive and handsome guide to the... More


Darwin's Fox and My Coyote

Holly Menino (Bailey)*

A rare fox in the South American cordillera. A disappearing fox on an island off California. A common coyote in the Albany suburbs. How do these wild carnivores live? And what is it about the places they live that allows them to survive? Holly Menino joins up with three young scientists to find out... More


What's Bugging You?

Arthur V. Evans

We are told from the time we are children that insects and spiders are pests, when the truth is that most have little or no effect on us--although the few that do are often essential to our existence. Arthur Evans suggests we take a closer look at our slapped-at, stepped-on, and otherwise ignored... More


Lifeboat

John R. Stilgoe

The fire extinguisher; the airline safety card; the lifeboat. Until September 11, 2001, most Americans paid homage to these appurtenances of disaster with a sidelong glance, if at all. But John Stilgoe has been thinking about lifeboats ever since he listened with his father as the kitchen radio... More


The Fruits and Fruit Trees of Monticello

Peter J. Hatch

Lavishly illustrated, Peter Hatch's The Fruits and Fruit Trees of Monticello is not only a detailed history of Jefferson's gardens and their re-creation but a virtual encyclopedia of early American pomology.


A Useful Dog

Donald McCaig

Alternately comical, melancholic, pragmatic, and poetic, Donald McCaig’s collection AUseful Dog offers a delightful exploration of the simple yet rich relationship between dogs and humans. Having cast aside urban life in the 1970s in favor of working and living on a sheep farm in Virginia, McCaig... More


Millipedes and Moon Tigers

Steve Nash

Millipedes and Moon Tigers explores those uneasy places where scientific research meets public policy-making--and the resulting human effect on our natural and historical landscapes. Steve Nash’s eye gravitates toward those specific, contemporary stories whose relevance does not diminish with a... More


Gilbert White

Richard Mabey

With more than two hundred editions, Gilbert White’s The Natural History of Selborne is one of the most published books in the English language. An environmental study of the eighteenth-century Hampshire parish where White was born and later served as curate, the book is distinguished by the author... More


Literature of Place

Melanie Simo

In a world that is increasingly reliant on science, technology, and virtual relationships, our reciprocal and intimate connection to place has often been overlooked. This concern is now at the forefront of debate among environmental planners and designers, who are asking: What is distinctive and... More


Earth Repair

Marcus Hall

Just as the restoration of Michelangelo’s Last Judgment sparked enormous controversy in the art world, so are environmental restorationists intensely divided when it comes to finding ways to rehabilitate damaged ecosystems. Although environmental restoration is quickly becoming a widespread pursuit... More


The American Wilderness

Thomas R. Vale

Interpretations of wild nature and wilderness are particularly diverse in the American mind, given our history, our collective economic success, and our diverse social and cultural mix. Although the meanings we attribute to nature reflect our different views of the role humans should play in the... More


Design with Culture

Charles A. Birnbaum and Mary V. Hughes, eds.

Often viewed as nostalgic and inauthentic, the work of early preservationists has frequently been underrated by modern practitioners. Rather than considering early preservation within its historical context, many modern preservationists judge their predecessors’ work by contemporary standards,... More


An American Cutting Garden

Suzanne McIntire

In An American Cutting Garden Suzanne McIntire describes how to plan a cutting garden, choose suitable plants, keep the garden in good order, and harvest a bountiful crop—all with charm and humor. Using both common and botanical names, she discusses in depth a wide variety of herbaceous perennials... More


Place, Art, and Self

Yi-Fu Tuan. with photographs by Tammy Mercure, Jocelyn Nevel, John Willis, and Tom Young

"What do place, art, and self have in common? To what extent do place and art define who we are?" In Place, Art, and Self, the renowned humanistic geographer Yi-Fu Tuan tackles this large question in a small, accessible, beautifully illustrated book. Through memoir and the insights gained from a... More


Cumberland Island National Seashore

Lary M. Dilsaver

Located off the coast of Georgia, Cumberland Island was once the retreat of some of America’s wealthiest families, most notably the family of Thomas Carnegie, brother of steel magnate Andrew Carnegie, and his wife Lucy. The death in 1962 of their last child, Florence Carnegie Perkins, ended the... More


Skinny Dipping

Janet Lembke

The author of the acclaimed Dangerous Birds followed that success with a new collection of essays on the natural world, these connected by the theme of water: exploring issues as varied as the joy that water brings, the wistful rememberings it engenders, and its sacredness. As with all of Lembke’s... More


The Changing Scale of American Agriculture

John Fraser Hart

Few Americans know much about contemporary farming, which has evolved dramatically over the past few decades. In The Changing Scale of American Agriculture, the award-winning geographer and landscape historian John Fraser Hart describes the transformation of farming from the mid-twentieth century,... More


The History of Ornithology in Virginia

David W. Johnston

Host to a large and diverse bird population as well as a long human history, Virginia is arguably the birthplace of ornithology in North America. David W. Johnston’s History of Ornithology in Virginia,the result of over a decade of research, is the first book to address this fascinating element of... More


Shorewords

Susan A. C. Rosen

Emily Dickinson, Lucille Clifton, Rachel Carson, and Gretel Ehrlich: They hail from different regions, employ widely divergent writing styles, and are not known primarily as nature writers. Yet in Shorewords, Susan A. C. Rosen has compiled an imaginative and beautifully balanced anthology of... More


New Orleans

Peirce F. Lewis

In his now classic work of historical geography, published in 1976, Lewis traces the rise and expansion of New Orleans through four major historic periods. This second edition offers a revised and greatly expanded look at this unique community on the Mississippi Delta--"a fearsome place, difficult... More


Dreaming Gardens

Kenneth I. Helphand

[Book description not available]


The Pleasure Gardens of Virginia

Peter Martin

Using a rich assortment of illustrations and biographical sketches, Peter Martin relates the experiences of colonial gardeners who shaped the natural beauty of Virginia's wilderness into varied displays of elegance. He shows that ornamental gardening was a scientific, aesthetic, and cultural... More


His and Hers

Roger Horowitz and Arwen Mohun, eds.

The pathbreaking essays in this collection explore the history of consumption by synthesizing discrete historical literatures on consumer culture, gender, and the history of technology. Luxury hotels and the chocolate industry are among the diverse array of topics these authors use to demonstrate... More


Earth Works

Nancy Ross Hugo

In Earth Works, award-winning columnist Nancy R. Hugo presents a month-by-month, season-by-season exploration of the pleasures and pains of gardening in the mid-Atlantic. Readers familiar with her columns in the Richmond Times-Dispatch and Virginia Wildlife will welcome this collection of her most... More


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