You are here

History and Political Science


Essays from the Edge

Martin Jay

Over his distinguished career as a European intellectual historian and cultural critic, Martin Jay has explored a variety of major themes: the Frankfurt School, the exile of German intellectuals in America during the Nazi era, Western Marxism, the denigration of vision in twentieth-century French... More


The Enemy Within

Michael Thomas Smith

Stoked by a series of major scandals, popular fears of corruption in the Civil War North provide a unique window into Northern culture in the Civil War era. In The Enemy Within, Michael Thomas Smith relates these scandals—including those involving John C. Frémont’s administration in Missouri,... More


Shaping the Body Politic

edited by Maurie D. McInnis and Louis P. Nelson

Traditional narratives imply that art in early America was severely limited in scope. By contrast, these essays collectively argue that visual arts played a critical role in shaping an early American understanding of the body politic. American artists in the late colonial and early national periods... More


The Papers of James Madison
Secretary of State Series, vol. 9
James Madison. Edited by Mary A. Hackett, J. C. A. Stagg, Anne Mandeville Colony, Mary Parke Johnson, and Katharine E. Harbury

During the five months covered in this volume, James Madison attended Jefferson’s second inauguration, continued staffing territorial governments for the Orleans and Louisiana Territories, and observed growing factionalism among Republicans as Federalism waned. Abroad, the shifting of alliances... More


The Diaries of Gouverneur Morris

Gouverneur Morris. Edited by Melanie Randolph Miller

In October 1794, Gouverneur Morris, Jefferson’s successor as American minister to France, left Paris forever. A friend of George Washington and a major contributor to the American Constitution, Morris had witnessed the igniting of the French Revolution, the fall of the old regime, and the plunge... More


The Papers of George Washington
Presidential Series, vol. 16
George Washington. Edited by David R. Hoth and Carol S. Ebel

During the spring and summer of 1794, Washington and his cabinet faced concerns that arose from the ongoing war in Europe. Embargo evasions, activities of French and British privateers, and the formation of a league of armed neutrality by Denmark and Sweden required appropriate administrative... More


Remaking Custom

Ellen Holmes Pearson

History has largely forgotten the writings, both public and private, of early nineteenth-century America’s legal scholars. However, Ellen Holmes Pearson argues that the observers from this era had a unique perspective on the young nation and the directions in which its legal culture might go.... More


The Madisons at Montpelier

Ralph Ketcham

Restored to its original splendor, Montpelier is now a national shrine, but before Montpelier became a place of study and tribute, it was a home. Often kept from it by the business of the young nation, James and Dolley Madison could finally take up permanent residence when they retired from... More


From Jamestown to Jefferson

Edited by Paul Rasor and Richard E. Bond

From Jamestown to Jefferson sheds new light on the contexts surrounding Thomas Jefferson’s Statute for Religious Freedom—and on the emergence of the American understanding of religious freedom—by examining its deep roots in colonial Virginia’s remarkable religious diversity. Challenging... More


Civil War Sites in Virginia

James I. Robertson, Jr., and Brian Steel Wills

Since 1982, the renowned Civil War historian James I. "Bud" Robertson’s Civil War Sites in Virginia: A Tour Guide has enlightened and informed Civil War enthusiasts and scholars alike. The book expertly explores the commonwealth’s Civil War sites for those hoping to gain greater insight and... More


Alexis de Tocqueville and Gustave de Beaumont in America

Alexis de Tocqueville. Edited by Olivier Zunz. Translated by Arthur Goldhammer

Alexis de Tocqueville, a young aristocrat of twenty-five, worried deeply about the future of France as well as his own fate in his native country, which had just experienced its second revolution in less than fifty years. Along with Gustave de Beaumont, a fellow magistrate, Tocqueville conceived... More


Transient and Permanent

Edited by Charles Capper and Conrad Edick Wright

Comprising twenty essays by leading scholars, this insightful collection provides the best recent writing on the Transcendentalists, the New England religious reformers and intellectuals who challenged both spiritual and secular orthodoxies between the 1830s and the 1850s. The volume addresses... More


Radical Reform

Deborah Beckel

Radical Reform describes a remarkable chapter in the American pro-democracy movement. It portrays the largely unknown leaders of the interracial Republican Party who struggled for political, civil, and labor rights in North Carolina after the Civil War. In so doing, they paved the way for the... More


Merely Judgment

Martin J. Sweet

Merely Judgment uses affirmative action in government contracting, legislative vetoes, flag burning, hate speech, and school prayer as windows for understanding how Supreme Court decisions send signals regarding the Court’s policy preferences to institutions and actors (such as lower courts,... More


The Big House after Slavery

Amy Feely Morsman

The Big House after Slavery examines the economic, social, and political challenges that Virginia planter families faced following Confederate defeat and emancipation. Amy Feely Morsman addresses how men and women of the planter class responded to postwar problems and how their adaptations to life... More


A Young Virginia Boatman Navigates the Civil War

George Randolph Wood. Edited by Will Molineux. Introduction by Scott Nelson

George Randolph Wood filled several journal books with personal remembrances of life in nineteenth-century Hampton, Virginia; particularly of his experiences aboard river and canal boats transporting supplies for Confederate troops along the James River during the Civil War. Wood wrote about his... More


Jefferson, Lincoln, and Wilson

Edited by John Milton Cooper, Jr., and Thomas J. Knock

Jefferson, Lincoln, and Wilson: The American Dilemma of Race and Democracy seeks to explore how the collision of races shaped American democracy in the lives, thought, and actions of three of the nation’s most important presidents. Each of them led the nation in a different epoch, during times... More


Seeing Jefferson Anew

edited by John B. Boles and Randal L. Hall

Thomas Jefferson’s ideas have been so important in shaping the character and aspirations of the United States that it has proven impossible to think about the state of the nation at almost any moment without implicit or explicit reference to his words and actions. In similar fashion, each... More


This Glorious Struggle

edited by Edward G. Lengel

George Washington wrote an astonishing number of letters, both personal and professional. The majority—about 140,000 documents—are from his years as commander in chief during the Revolutionary War, from 1775 to 1783. This Glorious Struggle presents a selection of Washington’s most important and... More


Battle over the Bench

Amy Steigerwalt

Who gets seated on the lower federal courts and why? Why are some nominees confirmed easily while others travel a long, hard road to confirmation? What role do senators and interest groups play in determining who will become a federal judge? The lower federal courts have increasingly become the... More


A Passion for the Past

Ivor Noël Hume

Ivor Noël Hume has devoted his life to uncovering countless lives that came before him. In A Passion for the Past the world-renowned archaeologist turns to his own life, sharing with the reader a story that begins amid the bombed-out rubble of post–World War II London and ends on North Carolina’s... More


The Papers of George Washington
Revolutionary War Series, vol. 20
George Washington. Edited by Edward G. Lengel

Volume 20 of the Revolutionary War Series covers 8 April to 31 May 1779. As it begins, Washington is gathering intelligence in preparation for a summer expedition against the Iroquois Confederacy. After considering various intelligence reports compiled with the help of scouts and spies, he issued... More


Governing the Commonwealth

Robert Dudley

Governing the Commonwealth provides middle-school students with an introduction to Virginia’s government: its structure, processes, powers, and scope. The middle-school civics curriculum requires teachers to cover Virginia’s government, and there has not been a useful text to do this until now.... More


Henry Hulton and the American Revolution

Neil Longley York

Henry Hulton was an Englishman who moved to Boston in 1767 as a member of the new American Board of Customs Commissioners. The board was supposed to curtail smuggling and bring greater efficiency to the administration of empire. It failed, and Hulton fled Massachusetts in 1776, joining an exodus of... More


Almanac of Virginia Politics 2010

Toni-Michelle C. Travis

Published since 1977 and updated every two years, the Almanac of Virginia Politics is the leading source of information on the legislative process and key players in Virginia government. The 2010 volume covers the 2009 elections and is invaluable for those tracking the changing demographics that... More


Pages