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Philosophy and Religion


Mourning Religion

Edited by William B. Parsons, Diane Jonte-Pace, and Susan E. Henking

Late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century theorists such as Freud, Durkheim, Weber, and Marx built their intellectual edifices on what they thought would be the remains or ruins of religion in the wake of modernization. But today the decline and disappearance of religion can no longer be simply... More


Praise of the Secular

Gabriel Vahanian

Conservative religious figures routinely warn against the dangers of secularization, just as proponents of the modern secular state decry the theocratic tendencies of religion. Both sides assume that the sacred and the secular are diametrically opposed. Gabriel Vahanian rightly calls such... More


Sacred Claims

Greg Johnson

The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) of 1990 provides a legal framework within which Native Americans can seek the repatriation of human remains and certain categories of cultural objects--including "sacred objects"--from federally funded institutions. Although the... More


The Making of Modern Cynicism

David Mazella

Once describing a life of exile, self-denial, physical rigor, and mastery of one’s desires, cynicism now describes a life of political quietism, passivity, and moral indifference, representing not a weakening of ancient philosophic norms but rather their inversion. In The Making of Modern Cynicism... More


The Conversation of Humanity

Stephen Mulhall

Based on the author’s Page-Barbour lectures, delivered at the University of Virginia in 2005, The Conversation of Humanity critically examines the idea that the nature of language can best be understood in terms of the model or figure of conversation. According to this idea, language has an... More


John Ruskin and the Ethics of Consumption

David M. Craig

The first book on the Victorian critic and public intellectual John Ruskin by a scholar of religion and ethics, this work recovers both Ruskin's engaged critique of economic life and his public practice of moral imagination. With its reading of Ruskin as an innovative contributor to a tradition of... More


Socrates and the Irrational

James S. Hans

Traditionally, Socrates has been linked to the view of reason as the most important element in human behavior, the means through which our irrational capacities are tamed. Yet, one might ask, if his legacy were solely derived from his having been a master reasoner, why would he have been able to... More


Religion in a Secular World

Clayton Crockett, ed.

How are we to think about religion and violence in the contemporary world, especially in the wake of the events of September 11, 2001? In this collection of essays, nearly a dozen scholars, including some of the leading voices in the field of academic religious thought, offer a theoretical and... More


Pontius Pilate

Roger Caillois. Translated by Charles Lam Markmann, with an introduction by Ivan Strenski

If you thought you knew all there is to know about Pontius Pilate and Jesus, this little book has some surprises for you. In this "greatest story never told," Pontius Pilate finally gets a chance to tell his side of the story, filling in what the Bible left out. For someone who made one of the most... More


Paranoia and Contentment

John C. Hampsey

A hybrid in both content and style, Paranoia and Contentment is a bold and original investigation into Western intellectual history. John Hampsey approaches paranoia not as a clinical term for an irrational sense of persecution but from a uniquely positive perspective, as a cultural truth—a way of... More


The Book of Common Prayer, 1559

Booty, John E., ed.. Foreword by Judith Maltby

John E. Booty’s edition of The Book of Common Prayer, 1559, first published by the University Press of Virginia for the Folger Shakespeare Library in 1976 and long out of print, is now being reissued in the same handsome format as the original edition. In her foreword to the 2005 reissue, Judith... More


Nietzsche on Gender

Frances Nesbitt Oppel

Although Nietzsche has been considered by some critics to be a misogynist for his treatment of woman, women, and the feminine, Frances Nesbitt Oppel offers a radical reinterpretation of the philosopher's ideas on sex, gender, and sexuality. In Nietzsche on Gender: Beyond Man and Woman, she argues... More


Northrop Frye

Robert D. Denham

Even the casual reader will notice a strong preoccupation with religion in the work of Northrop Frye. In his latest book, however, the esteemed Frye scholar Robert Denham shows that it played a far greater role than has been assumed—religion was in fact central to practically everything Frye wrote... More


The Value of Solitude

John D. Barbour

Most people feel ambivalent about solitude, both loving and fearing it depending on how they experience being alone at certain points in their lives. In The Value of Solitude, John Barbour explores some of the ways in which experiences of solitude, both positive and negative, have been interpreted... More


Meditation and the Martial Arts

Michael L. Raposa

The relationship between meditation and the martial arts is a multifaceted one: meditation is one of the practices in which martial artists engage in order to prepare for combat, while the physical exercises constituting much of the discipline of the martial arts might well be considered meditative... More


Between Faith and Thought

Jeffrey W. Robbins

The ontotheological problem is perhaps the defining issue of contemporary philosophical theology, as it reveals that dimension of thought where reason and faith are indivisible and indissoluble—where philosophy recognizes its faith in reason and theology realizes its responsibility to thought. In... More


Exhibiting Religion

John P. Burris

World’s fairs contributed mightily to defining a relationship between religion and the wider world of human culture. Even at the base level of popular culture found on the midways of the earliest international expositions—where Victorian ladies gawked at displays of non-Western, "primitive" life—... More


Taking Responsibility

Winston Davis, ed.

Responsibility has become the "queen of modern virtues," Winston Davis argues, even if there is no consensus as to what responsibility means. This illuminating collection of essays encompasses conceptions of responsibility around the globe, as discussed by leading scholars in the fields of... More


Symbolic Loss

Peter Homans

Historically, many world cultures have linked three disparate phenomena: collective loss; mourning; and the construction of monuments and cultural symbols to represent the loss over time and render it memorable, meaningful,and thereby bearable. In a century of great loss, observers of western... More


Modernity and Subjectivity

Harvie Ferguson

Few concepts have come to dominate the human sciences as much as modernity, yet there is very little agreement over what the term actually means. Every aspect of contemporary human reality—modern society, modern life, modern times, modern art, modern science, modern music, the modern world—has been... More


Boredom and the Religious Imagination

Michael L. Raposa

Boredom matters, writes Michael Raposa, because it represents a threat to spiritual life. Boredom can undermine prayer and meditation and signal the failure of religious imagination. If you engage it seriously, however, it can also be the starting point for philosophical reflection and spiritual... More


The Otherness of God

Orrin F. Summerell, ed.

This volume offers essays on the nature of God and the fundamental tasks of philosophy and theology written by internationally recognized thinkers in the distinct fields of philosophy, religious studies, and theology. The Otherness of God traces the lineage of its theme from Plato and Aristotle... More


Myth and Method

Laurie L. Patton and Wendy Doniger, eds.

In the wake of the elegant master theories of Joseph Campbell, Mircea Eliade, Georges Dumezil, and Claude Levi-Strauss, how are mythology and the comparative study of religion to be understood? In Myth and Method, a leading team of scholars assesses the current state of the study of myth and... More


Savage Systems

David Chidester

Savage Systems examines the emergence of the concepts of "religion"and "religions" on colonial frontiers. The book offers a detailed analysis of the ways in which European travelers, missionaries, settlers, and government agents, as well as indigenous Africans, engaged in the comparison of... More


Captured by Texts

Gary L. Ebersole

How has the American Indian captivity narrative been used to explain the human condition? How does it serve to interpret the meaning of pain and suffering, gender, and the primitive-civilized dichotomy? In Captured by Texts, Gary L. Ebersole explores these questions, showing that our fictional... More


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