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MidCentury: Architecture, Landscape, Urbanism, and Design

Encompassing architectural, landscape, urban, interior, and other forms of design, Midcentury Modernism was an international movement that had its inception in the era immediately preceding World War II and extended well into the 1960s. It was expressed not only in important High Modernist works by Frank Lloyd Wright and Walter Gropius, and the daring futuristic constructions of Buckminster Fuller, but also, more modestly, in the new vernacular landscapes, architecture, and cityscapes of suburbia. Today we have enough distance on the quotidian works of the era to consider them of historical and cultural significance. In fact, stylistic aspects of both high-style and mass-market design of the time are frequently reiterated in contemporary architecture, and period buildings have escalated substantially in value. 

MIDCENTURY: A Series on Architecture, Landscape, Urbanism, and Design will consider manuscripts in architecturally related disciplines within the distinctive cultural context of their time. Its temporal parameters will be 1945-1970; though primarily American in focus, it will be open to transnational and comparative projects as well. 

Format for Proposals: Approximately 80,000 to 85,000 words with a maximum of 60 black-and-white illustrations (e.g., halftones, line drawings, maps, site plans). Only under very unusual circumstances will color illustrations be considered for inclusion. 

For more information, please contact : 

Boyd Zenner
Acquiring Editor, Architecture and Environment
434-924-1373 bz2v@virginia.edu


Detached America

James A. Jacobs

During the quarter century between 1945 and 1970, Americans crafted a new manner of living that shaped and reshaped how residential builders designed and marketed millions of detached single-family suburban houses. The modest two- and three-bedroom houses built immediately following the war gave... More