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Race, Ethnicity, and Politics

This series explores the implications of the increasingly multiracial, multiethnic, and multicultural composition of American cities and of American society more generally. Books in the series look at intergroup competition and conflict; at ambiguities of increased minority representation resulting from white out-migration and the application of the Voting Rights Act; at daunting urban crises in which race and ethnicity play a central part; and at a range of theoretical issues tied to racial and ethnic diversity.

Series Editors: Luis Ricardo Fraga and Paula D. McClain

Editorial Advisory Board: Bruce Cain, Louis DeSipio, Steven P. Erie, F. Chris Garcia, Bernard Grofman, Don T. Nakanishi, Gary Orfield, Dianne Pinderhughes, Michael Preston, Joseph Stewart Jr. , Katherine Tate


Partners or Rivals?

Betina Cutaia Wilkinson

The emerging demographic and political presence of Latinos in the United States has moved the discussion of race relations beyond the terms of black and white. Using a variety of theoretical approaches, Betina Cutaia Wilkinson assesses Latinos', blacks', and whites' perceptions of commonality and... More


Bringing Race Back In

Christopher T. Stout

Bringing Race Back In empirically investigates whether "post-racial" campaign strategies, which are becoming increasingly common, improve black candidates’ ability to mobilize and attract voters of all races and ethnicities. In contrast to existing studies, this analysis demonstrates that black... More


Mobilizing Opportunities

Ricardo Ramírez

The growth of the Latino population is the most significant demographic shift in the United States today. Yet growth alone cannot explain this population’s increasing impact on the electorate; nor can a parsing of its subethnicities. In the most significant analysis to date on the growing political... More


Ambivalent Miracles

Nancy D. Wadsworth

Over the past three decades, American evangelical Christians have undergone unexpected, progressive shifts in the area of race relations, culminating in a national movement that advocates racial integration and equality in evangelical communities. The movement, which seeks to build cross-racial... More


Transforming Politics, Transforming America

Taeku Lee, S. Karthick Ramakrishnan, and Ricardo Ramírez, eds.

Over the past four decades, the foreign-born population in the United States has nearly tripled, from about 10 million in 1965 to more than 30 million today. This wave of new Americans comes in disproportionately large numbers from Latin America and Asia, a pattern that is likely to continue in... More


The Color of Power

Frédérick Douzet. Translated by George Holoch

The Color of Power is a fascinating examination of the changing politics of race in Oakland, California. Oakland has been at the forefront of California’s multicultural changes for decades. Since the 1960s, the city has been a shining example of a fruitful liberal black-and-white political... More


Faith and Race in American Political Life

Edited by Robin Dale Jacobson and Nancy D. Wadsworth

Drawing on scholarship from an array of disciplines, this volume provides a deep and timely look at the intertwining of race and religion in American politics. The contributors apply the methods of intersectionality, but where this approach has typically considered race, class, and gender, the... More


Latino Politics

Rodolfo Espino, David L. Leal, and Kenneth J. Meier, eds.

Due to the dramatic growth of the Latino population in America, in combination with the relative decline of the Anglo (non-Hispanic white) share, Latino Studies is increasingly at the forefront of political concern. With Latino Politics: Identity, Mobilization, and Representation, editors Rodolfo... More


Lessons in Integration

Erica Frankenberg and Gary Orfield, eds.

Segregation is deepening in American schools as courts terminate desegregation plans, residential segregation spreads, the proportion of whites in the population falls, and successful efforts to use choice for desegregation, such as magnet schools, are replaced by choice plans with no civil rights... More


Diversity in Democracy

Gary M. Segura and Shaun Bowler, eds.

As the racial and ethnic minority populations of the United States grow past 30 percent, candidates cannot afford to ignore the minority vote. The studies collected in Diversity and Democracy show that political scientists, too, must fully recognize the significance of minority-representation... More


Legacies of the 1964 Civil Rights Act

Bernard Grofman, ed.

The 1964 Civil Rights Act, in conjunction with the Voting Rights Act of the following year, totally transformed the shape of American race relations. Supporters of the Civil Rights Act sought, at minimum, the elimination of racial segregation in publicly supported schools, hospitals, public... More


Counting on the Latino Vote

Louis DeSipio

Latinos, along with other new immigrants, are not being incorporated into U.S. politics as rapidly as their predecessors, raising concerns about political fragmentation along ethnic lines. In Counting on the Latino Vote, Louis DeSipio uses the first national studies of Latinos to investigate... More


Imagining Miami

Sheila L. Croucher

Miami has long captured the world's attention in provocative ways. During the 1980s, a series of violent racial disturbances focused national and international attention there as analysts and observers scrambled to explain the demise of the "Magic City." What has emerged is a popular image of Miami... More