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Architecture


SAH Archipedia

SAH Archipedia is an authoritative online encyclopedia of the built world published by the Society of Architectural Historians and the University of Virginia Press, and contains histories, photographs, and maps for more than 17,000 structures and places. These are mostly buildings, but as you... More


The Log Cabin

Alison K. Hoagland

For roughly a century, the log cabin occupied a central and indispensable role in the rapidly growing United States. Although it largely disappeared as a living space, it lived on as a symbol of the settling of the nation. In her thought-provoking and generously illustrated new book, Alison... More


Material Witnesses

Camille Wells

The Chesapeake region of eastern Virginia and Maryland offers a wealth of evidence for readers and researchers who want to discover what life was like in early America. In this eagerly anticipated volume, Camille Wells, one of the foremost experts on eighteenth-century Virginia architecture,... More


Buildings of Arkansas

Cyrus A. Sutherland. With Gregory Herman, Claudia Shannon, Jean Sizemore, and Jeannie M. Whayne

From Fayetteville, Little Rock, and Hot Springs to Jonesboro, El Dorado, Arkadelphia, Texarkana, and scores of places in between, the latest volume in the Buildings of the United States series provides the most comprehensive, authoritative, and up-to-date guide to the architecture of Arkansas. The... More


Slavery in the City

Edited by Clifton Ellis and Rebecca Ginsburg

Countering the widespread misconception that slavery existed only on plantations, and that urban areas were immune from its impacts, Slavery in the City is the first volume to deal exclusively with the impact of North American slavery on urban design and city life during the antebellum period. This... More


Skyscraper Gothic

Edited by Kevin D. Murphy and Lisa Reilly

Of all building types, the skyscraper strikes observers as the most modern, in terms not only of height but also of boldness, scale, ingenuity, and daring. As a phenomenon born in late nineteenth-century America, it quickly became emblematic of New York, Chicago, and other major cities. Previous... More


The Law School at the University of Virginia

Philip Mills Herrington

As a UNESCO World Heritage Site and a masterwork of Thomas Jefferson, the "Academical Village" at the heart of the University of Virginia has long attracted the attention of visitors and scholars alike. Yet today Jefferson’s original structures make up only a small fraction of a campus comprising... More


Biography of a Tenement House in New York City

Andrew S. Dolkart

"I trace my ancestry back to the Mayflower," writes Andrew S. Dolkart. "Not to the legendary ship that brought the Pilgrims to Plymouth, Massachusetts, in 1620, but to the more prosaic tenement on the southeast corner of East Broadway and Clinton Street named the Mayflower, where my father was born... More


Buildings of Wisconsin

Marsha Weisiger and contributors

From Milwaukee to Madison, Racine to Eau Claire, La Crosse to Sheboygan, and scores of places in between, tradition and progressivism have shaped Wisconsin's architectural landscape. This latest volume in the Society of Architectural Historians' Buildings of the United States series showcases... More


Intelligent Infrastructure

T. F. Tierney, ed.

While many of its traditional elements, such as roads and utilities, do not change, urban infrastructure is undergoing a fascinating and necessary transformation in the wake of new information and communication technologies. This volume brings together many of the most important new voices in the... More


First in the Homes of His Countrymen

Lydia Mattice Brandt

Over the past two hundred years, Americans have reproduced George Washington’s Mount Vernon plantation house more often, and in a greater variety of media, than any of their country’s other historic buildings. In this highly original new book, Lydia Mattice Brandt chronicles America’s obsession... More


Looking beyond the Icons

Richard Longstreth

Renowned for his extensive work in architectural history and historic preservation as an educator, scholar, activist, and public lecturer, Richard Longstreth is one of the most important architectural preservationists of the recent past. Looking beyond the Icons offers a generous and diverse... More


Dream House

Adele Tutter

Famous for its transparency, the Philip Johnson Glass House--the icon of modernism that Vincent Scully called "the most conceptually important house of the century"--has nonetheless proven vexingly opaque to interpretation. Its architect, Philip Cortelyou Johnson, has been equally elusive, a... More


Buildings of Savannah

Robin B. Williams. With David Gobel, Patrick Haughey, Daves Rossell, and Karl Schuler

While Savannah's famous urban plan is rightly renowned in many studies of urban history, what brings streams of tourists and architects to the city, and daily engages residents with its fascinating history, are not abstract principles of urban planning but a compelling fabric of buildings... More


Architecture in Play

Tamar Zinguer

Created for children but designed by adults with considerable ingenuity, architectural toys have long offered a window on a much larger world. In Architecture in Play, Tamar Zinguer explores the nearly two-hundred-year period over which such playthings have reflected changing attitudes toward form... More


Analogy and Design

Andrea Ponsi. Translated by Antony Shugaar

Analogical thought is fundamental to creativity. The use of analogy can help to solve problems, make connections between disciplines, and use those relations to form original solutions.In Analogy and Design, Andrea Ponsi considers the role of analogical thought in architectural design. Almost all... More


Detached America

James A. Jacobs

During the quarter century between 1945 and 1970, Americans crafted a new manner of living that shaped and reshaped how residential builders designed and marketed millions of detached single-family suburban houses. The modest two- and three-bedroom houses built immediately following the war gave... More


Buildings of North Dakota

Steve C. Martens and Ronald H. L. M. Ramsay

For many people outside the state, North Dakota conjures visions of a remote, sparse, and seemingly inhospitable landscape, replete with ghost towns, scattered farmsteads, and settings reminiscent of the movie Fargo. Yet beyond this facile image lies a spectacular array of high-style, vernacular,... More


The Oglethorpe Plan

Thomas D. Wilson

The statesman and reformer James Oglethorpe was a significant figure in the philosophical and political landscape of eighteenth-century British America. His social contributions—all informed by Enlightenment ideals—included prison reform, the founding of the Georgia Colony on behalf of the "worthy... More


San Francisco

Andrea Ponsi

San Francisco is a city designed for artists and wanderers. From North Beach, to Chinatown, to the cold, rough surf of Ocean Beach, to Marin, both visitors and lifelong residents have endless opportunities to explore new neighborhoods, buildings, environments, and cultures just by getting in the... More


Buildings of Virginia

Anne Carter Lee. With Contributors

Virginia is as much a state of mind as a set of geographical boundaries. Its western terrain encompasses dramatically beautiful mountaintops and scrubby lowlands, luxuriantly rich terrain, and rocky, almost untillable land. The green forests, rich loam, red clay, and sandy soil attracted waves of... More


Frank Lloyd Wright

Edited by Richard Longstreth

The buildings of Frank Lloyd Wright are not immune to the social and environmental forces that affect all architecture. Because of the popular recognition and historical significance of his work, however, the stakes are unusually high when his buildings are modified in any way. Any additions or... More


Frank Lloyd Wright's Pope-Leighey House

Steven M. Reiss

Frank Lloyd Wright designed and realized over 500 buildings between 1886 and 1959 for a wide range of clients. In Frank Lloyd Wright's Pope-Leighey House, architect Steven M. Reiss presents the updated and detailed story of one of Wright’s few Virginia commissions. Designed and built for Loren and... More


After the Deluge

Edited by Kim Tanzer

After the Deluge serves as a demonstration of the practical imagination applied to the ecology of water. Taking Leonardo da Vinci’s "deluge" drawings of catastrophic floods as its starting point, and inspired by his lifelong study of all aspects of water, the dialogues in this book gather together... More


Architecture as Medicine

Reuben M. Rainey and Alana K. Schrader

Rainey and Schrader explore an innovative University of Florida cancer hospital, focusing on its many patient-centered design features as well as the sophisticated planning process and construction management strategy involved in its realization. This generously illustrated volume will interest... More


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