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Geography


Genealogies of Environmentalism

Clarence Glacken. Edited by S. Ravi Rajan. With Adam Romero and Michael Watts

Clarence Glacken wrote one of the most important books on environmental issues published in the twentieth century. His magnum opus, Traces on the Rhodian Shore, first published in 1967, details the ways in which perceptions of the natural environment have profoundly influenced human enterprise over... More


Easy On, Easy Off

Jack Williams

Life outside our nation’s big cities comprises a remarkably rich aspect of America—culturally, historically, and physically. Because of the way we move through the country, however—on roads built for maximum expediency—most of us are rarely if ever exposed to these small communities, a trend that... More


The Significance of Territory

Jean Gottman

Over her thirty-year study of the concept of territory, Jean Gottmann has seen its significance evolve in a wide variety of ways throughout the world. Factors that influence the attitude of people toward their territory involve studies of geography, politics, and economics of a region. The... More


The Last Launch

Yi-Fu Tuan

Yi-Fu Tuan, one of the world’s most honored scholars and the founder of humanist geography, has spent a lifetime exploring the relationship between the places and spaces that surround us and the inner self. In particular, his writings have focused on what it means to achieve human dignity within... More


To Pass On a Good Earth

Michael Williams. With David Lowenthal and William M. Denevan

To Pass On a Good Earth is the candid and compelling new biography of one of the twentieth century’s most distinctive and influential scholars. The legendary "Great God beyond the Sierras," Carl Ortwin Sauer is America’s most famed geographer, an inspiration to both academics and poets, yet no... More


Imagining Mount Athos

Veronica della Dora. Foreword by David Lowenthal

For more than one thousand years the monastic republic of Mount Athos has been one of the most chronicled and yet least accessible places in the Mediterranean. Difficult to reach until the last century and strictly restricted to male visitors only, the Holy Mountain of Orthodoxy has been known in... More


City Trees

Henry W. Lawrence

For those who have ever wondered why we have trees in cities or what makes the layout of cities like Paris and Amsterdam seem so memorable, City Trees: A Historical Geography from the Renaissance through the Nineteenth Century by Henry W. Lawrence provides a comprehensive and handsome guide to the... More


The American Wilderness

Thomas R. Vale

Interpretations of wild nature and wilderness are particularly diverse in the American mind, given our history, our collective economic success, and our diverse social and cultural mix. Although the meanings we attribute to nature reflect our different views of the role humans should play in the... More


Cumberland Island National Seashore

Lary M. Dilsaver

Located off the coast of Georgia, Cumberland Island was once the retreat of some of America’s wealthiest families, most notably the family of Thomas Carnegie, brother of steel magnate Andrew Carnegie, and his wife Lucy. The death in 1962 of their last child, Florence Carnegie Perkins, ended the... More


The Changing Scale of American Agriculture

John Fraser Hart

Few Americans know much about contemporary farming, which has evolved dramatically over the past few decades. In The Changing Scale of American Agriculture, the award-winning geographer and landscape historian John Fraser Hart describes the transformation of farming from the mid-twentieth century,... More


New Orleans

Peirce F. Lewis

In his now classic work of historical geography, published in 1976, Lewis traces the rise and expansion of New Orleans through four major historic periods. This second edition offers a revised and greatly expanded look at this unique community on the Mississippi Delta--"a fearsome place, difficult... More