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Modern American History


The President and His Biographer

Merrill D. Peterson

As his presidency drew to a close, Woodrow Wilson came to realize the claim history would soon have on the documentary record of his life and work, of which he had been a rather inattentive keeper. While some of his more important manuscripts had been kept at his home on S Street in Washington, D.C... More


Revolution in Virginia, with a new Foreword

John E. Selby

Unsurpassed as a single-volume history, John E. Selby’s masterpiece analyzes the political, administrative, and military history of Virginia during the American Revolution. Stressing the contributions, in both men and material, that the state made to the new nation’s war effort, Shelby shows how... More


Brushing Back Jim Crow

Bruce Adelson

While Jackie Robinson is justly famous for breaking the color line in major league baseball in 1947, other young African American players, among them Hank Aaron, continued to struggle for acceptance on southern farm teams well into the 1960s. As Bruce Adelson writes, their presence in the South... More


Black, White, and Olive Drab

Andrew H. Myers

One of the first Army bases to implement on a large scale President Truman’s call for racial integration of the armed forces, Fort Jackson, South Carolina, quickly took its place in the Defense Department’s official history of the process. What reporters, and later on, historians, overlooked was... More


The Curry School of Education at the University of Virginia, 1905-2005

Eleanor Vernon Wilson

In 1905, as the University of Virginia inaugurated him as its first president, the revered southern educator Edwin Anderson Alderman proposed an education school, despite the thriving existence of normal teachers’ colleges, primarily female, throughout the state. John D. Rockefeller Sr. donated $... More


Faces of Community

Conrad E. Wright and Reed Ueda

For hundreds of thousands of immigrants, coming to Massachusetts has meant exchanging one community for another in multiple ways that are often overlooked. Whether home was originally an Irish tenant farm or the slave quarters of a Southern plantation or an Eastern European ghetto, whether its... More


"Starving Armenians"

Merrill D. Peterson

The persecution and suffering of the Armenian people, a religious and cultural minority in the Ottoman Empire, reached a peak in the era of World War I at the hands of the Turks. Between 1915 and 1925 as many as 1.5 million Armenian men, women, and children died in Ottoman Turkey, victims of... More


At the Picture Show

Kathryn H. Fuller

The motion picture industry in its earliest days seemed as ephemeral as the flickering images it produced. Considered an amusement fad even by their exhibitors, movies nevertheless spread quickly from big-city vaudeville houses to towns and rural communities across the nation. Small-town audiences... More


The Southern Agrarians and the New Deal

Emily S. Bingham and Thomas A. Underwood, eds.

Scholars frequently assume that the Southern Agrarian movement was limited to the philosophy laid out in the landmark 1930 book I'll Take My Stand. Yet that work consisted mainly of a philosophical critique of a nation that valued "progress" above spirituality. Were it not for the Agrarians' angry... More


The Moral Architecture of World Peace

Helena Cobban

In November 1998, eight visionary recipients of the Nobel Peace Prize gathered on the grounds of the University of Virginia for two days of extraordinary dialogue. From the words of His Holiness the Dalai Lama to Archbishop Desmond Tutu's riveting description of chairing South Africa's Truth and... More


Encounters

Ewa Domanska. Introduction by Allan Megill, Afterword by Lynn Hunt

Frustrated with the usual methods of scholarly inquiry, Ewa Domanska hit upon the idea of interviewing some of the world's most original and important theorists and philosophers of history to get at the heart of contemporary understandings of "history." The result is Encounters, an exciting... More


Interracialism and Christian Community in the Postwar South

Tracy Elaine K'meyer

Now available in paperback, Tracy K'Meyer's book is a thoughtful and engaging portrait of Koinonia Farm, an interracial Christian cooperative founded in 1942 by two white Baptist ministers in southwest Georgia. The farm was begun as an expression of radical southern Protestantism, and its... More


William Edward Dodd

Fred Arthur Bailey

William Edward Dodd rose from an impoverished background to become one of the early twentieth century's more distinguished southern historians. While many southern intellectuals of his time denied the existence of class conflict, Dodd made it his life's theme and was unique in using history as a... More


Dignity

Jean-Bertrand Aristide. Translated by Carrol F. Coates. Afterword by Carrol F. Coates. Introduction by Christophe Wargny

Dignity is Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide's compelling story of his three years of exile, from the coup that deposed him (September 30, 1991) to the U.N. Security Council vote in favor of military intervention (July 31, 1994). He offers an intensely personal journal of events, one that... More


Harry Byrd of Virginia

Ronald L. Heinemann

This is the first full-scale biography of Harry Byrd Sr., one of the most influential politicians of this century. His fascinating career as Virginia governor, U.S. senator, and leader of the Virginia Democratic Party enabled him to touch every important event and meet every significant political... More


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