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Political Science


Governing the Commonwealth

Robert Dudley

Governing the Commonwealth provides middle-school students with an introduction to Virginia’s government: its structure, processes, powers, and scope. The middle-school civics curriculum requires teachers to cover Virginia’s government, and there has not been a useful text to do this until now.... More


Almanac of Virginia Politics 2010

Toni-Michelle C. Travis

Published since 1977 and updated every two years, the Almanac of Virginia Politics is the leading source of information on the legislative process and key players in Virginia government. The 2010 volume covers the 2009 elections and is invaluable for those tracking the changing demographics that... More


Portrait of a Patriot

Josiah Quincy, Jr.. Edited by Daniel R. Coquillette and Neil Longley York

The most unique and important of all early American law reports are those of Josiah Quincy Jr. (1744–1775). These are the first reports of continental America’s oldest court, the Superior Court of Judicature of the Province of Massachusetts Bay, direct ancestor to today’s Massachusetts Supreme... More


Portrait of a Patriot

Josiah Quincy, Jr.. Edited by Daniel R. Coquillette and Neil Longley York

The most unique and important of all early American law reports are those of Josiah Quincy Jr. (1744–1775). These are the first reports of continental America’s oldest court, the Superior Court of Judicature of the Province of Massachusetts Bay, direct ancestor to today’s Massachusetts Supreme... More


Law, Politics, and Perception

Eileen Braman

Are judges' decisions more likely to be based on personal inclinations or legal authority? The answer, Eileen Braman argues, is both. Law, Politics, and Perception brings cognitive psychology to bear on the question of the relative importance of norms of legal reasoning versus decision markers'... More


Fixing College Education

Charles Muscatine

Since his early days at the University of California, Berkeley, when he was fired for refusing to sign a loyalty oath during the Red Scare, Charles Muscatine has been a dedicated teacher and higher education reformer. Upon his reinstatement at Berkeley, he founded "Strawberry Creek College," a six-... More


The View of the Courts from the Hill

Mark C. Miller

The View of the Courts from the Hill explores the current interactions and relationship between the U.S. Congress and federal courts using a "governance as dialogue" approach, which argues that constitutional interpretation in the United States is a continuous and complex conversation among all... More


Almanac of Virginia Politics 2008

Toni-Michelle C. Travis

Published since 1977 and updated every two years, the Almanac of Virginia Politics is the leading source of information on the legislative process and key players in Virginia government. The 2008 volume is invaluable for those tracking the changing demographics that are bringing about historical... More


Answering the Call of the Court

Vanessa A. Baird

The U.S. Supreme Court is the quintessential example of a court that expanded its agenda into policy areas that were once reserved for legislatures. Yet scholars know very little about what causes attention to various policy areas to ebb and flow on the Supreme Court’s agenda. Vanessa A. Baird’s... More


Latino Politics

Rodolfo Espino, David L. Leal, and Kenneth J. Meier, eds.

Due to the dramatic growth of the Latino population in America, in combination with the relative decline of the Anglo (non-Hispanic white) share, Latino Studies is increasingly at the forefront of political concern. With Latino Politics: Identity, Mobilization, and Representation, editors Rodolfo... More


Strategic Selection

Christine L. Nemacheck

The process by which presidents decide whom to nominate to fill Supreme Court vacancies is obviously of far-ranging importance, particularly because the vast majority of nominees are eventually confirmed. But why is one individual selected from among a pool of presumably qualified candidates? In... More


Lessons in Integration

Erica Frankenberg and Gary Orfield, eds.

Segregation is deepening in American schools as courts terminate desegregation plans, residential segregation spreads, the proportion of whites in the population falls, and successful efforts to use choice for desegregation, such as magnet schools, are replaced by choice plans with no civil rights... More


The Making of a Civil Rights Lawyer

Michael Meltsner

"It was not until I arrived at the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund that I learned my profession, how to work with colleagues and clients, and how it might feel to grow up in the law." So begins Michael Meltsner’s vivid account of how as a lawyer for Muhammad Ali, for the doctors who ended... More


Judging on a Collegial Court

Virginia A. Hettinger, Stefanie A. Lindquist, and Wendy L. Martinek

in the professional world as a starting point for collaboration; rather than leaving decisions to just one person, dissent offers the opportunity to rethink or reinvent an idea, leading, one hopes, to a better result. When dissensus occurs in a federal court, however, it raises the question of... More


Diversity in Democracy

Gary M. Segura and Shaun Bowler, eds.

As the racial and ethnic minority populations of the United States grow past 30 percent, candidates cannot afford to ignore the minority vote. The studies collected in Diversity and Democracy show that political scientists, too, must fully recognize the significance of minority-representation... More


The Struggle of Democracy against Terrorism

Emanuel Gross

Radically different from other struggles covered by the international laws of war, the war on terrorism continues to create new legal challenges and grave moral dilemmas for the free world. Democracies are increasingly faced with balancing security against civil liberties, human rights, and the... More


Equity and Excellence in American Higher Education

William G. Bowen, Martin A. Kurzweil, and Eugene M. Tobin. in collaboration with Susanne C. Pichler

Thomas Jefferson once stated that the foremost goal of American education must be to nurture the "natural aristocracy of talent and virtue." Although in many ways American higher education has fulfilled Jefferson’s vision by achieving a widespread level of excellence, it has not achieved the... More


Creating Constitutional Change

Gregg Ivers and Kevin T. McGuire, eds.

Because the justices of the U.S. Supreme Court tell us what the Constitution means, they can create constitutional change. For quite some time, general readers who have been interested in understanding those changes have not had a concise volume that explores major decisions in which those changes... More


The Bill of Rights, The Courts, and the Law

David Bearinger, ed.

The Bill of Rights, perhaps the single most important document in American history, has provided a strong and remarkably durable framework in which the limits of government, the scope of individual liberty, and the nature of our democratic system have been defined for more than two hundred years.... More


Judicial Independence in the Age of Democracy

Peter H. Russell and David M. O'Brien, eds.

This collection of essays by leading scholars of constitutional law looks at a critical component of constitutional democracy--judicial independence--from an international comparative perspective. Peter H. Russell's introduction outlines a general theory of judicial independence, while the... More


Legacies of the 1964 Civil Rights Act

Bernard Grofman, ed.

The 1964 Civil Rights Act, in conjunction with the Voting Rights Act of the following year, totally transformed the shape of American race relations. Supporters of the Civil Rights Act sought, at minimum, the elimination of racial segregation in publicly supported schools, hospitals, public... More


The State against the Peasantry

Merle L. Bowen

In 1975, the Front for the Liberation of Mozambique (Frelimo) led the country to independence after a ten-year guerilla war against Portuguese colonial rule. Peasants were essential to the victory, but once in power Frelimo evolved from a popular liberation movement into a bureaucratic one-party... More


Power versus Liberty

James H. Read

Does every increase in the power of government entail a loss of liberty for the people? James H. Read examines how four key Founders--James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, James Wilson, and Thomas Jefferson--wrestled with this question during the first two decades of the American Republic.Power versus... More


Counting on the Latino Vote

Louis DeSipio

Latinos, along with other new immigrants, are not being incorporated into U.S. politics as rapidly as their predecessors, raising concerns about political fragmentation along ethnic lines. In Counting on the Latino Vote, Louis DeSipio uses the first national studies of Latinos to investigate... More


The Modernity of Witchcraft

Peter Geschiere. Translated by Janet Roitman and Peter Geschiere

To many Westerners, the disappearance of African traditions of witchcraft might seem inevitable wuth continued modernization. In The Modernity of Witchcraft, Peter Geschieres uses his own experiences among the Maka and in other parts of eastern and southern Cameroon, as well as other... More


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