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Most writing on Abraham Lincoln focuses on his presidency and the Civil War, a time of intense, sustained tension. In his major new biography Becoming Lincoln, however, William Freehling has chosen to explore Lincoln's life before the war—to show Lincoln's early experiences came together uncannily to form the person who would one day lead the country through its most bitter chapter.

Remember the sense of discovery as a young person, reading one book after another? Do you ever wish books could affect you in that way again? So now let's say you're a prominent English professor and author of several books of your own. You have spent much of your life illuminating literaure for others. One could say you have reading down. Then you are struck by an illness that robs you of most of the things you enjoyed in a very active life. Is it any wonder that Jane Tompkins—to whom this very chain of events happened—found herself turning to books?

If you consume biographies, chances are you have read something by Jeffrey Meyers. In his latest book, Resurrections: Authors, Heroes—and a Spy, Meyers presents chapter-long biographies of some of the personages who have fascinated him the most. He agreed to answer a few questions about his latest book and its extraordinary cast of characters

Lee will be making appearances in support of his new book Virginia Beer: A Guide from Colonial Days to Craft's Golden Age at a number of breweries over the coming weeks and months. The schedule, which you can find below, constitutes a great statewide beer crawl. Please join Lee at one of his many stops for a beer and a book.

The front line of the racial violence last year in Charlottesville is not where anyone wanted to be. Placed in that position, however, journalist Hawes Spencer provided an invaluable service to his community, and indeed the whole country, by filing an urgent series of reports for the New York Times. We felt Spencer, a national voice who is also part of this community, was the right—and only—choice to author Summer of Hate: Charlottesville USA.

The University of Virginia Press is pleased to announce that it has formed a new partnership with the University of Delaware Press, effective July 1, 2018. The UD Press will retain its independent editorial office. UVA Press will provide manuscript editorial, design, and production services using highly skilled staff and leading-edge tools.

Mark Twain, Henry Adams, Zora Neale Hurston, Walt Whitman, Ambrose Bierce, Sinclair Lewis, Langston Hughes... Sounds like a literary dream team if ever there was one. What they all have in common is that they lived and worked in Washington DC. Not widely know as a city of authors, our nation's capital actually has an enormously rich, diverse literary tradition.

To mark the fiftieth anniversary of the loss of Martin Luther King, the Presidential Recordings site will be open to the public though April 10. Links to some of the most relevant recordings.

In the newly published SAH/BUS City Guide, Buildings of New Orleans, Karen Kingsley and Lake Douglas offer countless possibilities, from a quiet stroll through the Vieux Carré to an afternoon’s drive upriver.

Although so many central themes in the American saga converge in Richard Potter's life, there has never been a biography of this elusive man. John Hodgson has finally presented his life in a biography, Richard Potter: America's First Black Celebrity, which Kirkus Reviews calls a "definitive life history that gives voice to a pioneering and little-known entertainment legacy." Following is an interview with Hodgson on the fascinating story he has uncovered.

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