You are here

Art and Architecture


Buildings of Mississippi
Jennifer V. O. Baughn and Michael W. Fazio. With Mary Warren Miller

As Eudora Welty observed, "One place understood helps us know all places better." Nowhere is this more apropos than in her home state of Mississippi. Although accounts of its architecture have long conjured visions of white-columned antebellum mansions, its towns, buildings, and landscapes are... More


Portraiture and Friendship in Enlightenment France
Jessica L. Fripp

Portraiture and Friendship in Enlightenment France examines how new and often contradictory ideas about friendship were enacted in the lives of artists in the eighteenth century. It demonstrates that portraits resulted from and generated new ideas about friendship by analyzing the creation,... More


Enrique Alférez
Sculptor Katie Bowler Young

Enrique Alférez was born in Zacatecas, Mexico, but for almost seventy years, he worked in New Orleans, where he left a lasting imprint through his figurative sculptures, monuments, and fountains. Katie Bowler Young has gained unprecedented access to Alférez’s personal and family holdings and has... More


Realism and Role-Play
The Human Figure in French Art from Callot to the Brothers Le Nain Marika Knowles

After the heroic nudes of the Renaissance and depictions of the tortured bodies of Christian saints, early seventeenth-century French artists turned their attention to their fellow humans, to nobles and beggars seen on the streets of Paris, to courtesans standing at their windows, to vendors... More


Louis Kahn
A Life in Architecture Carter Wiseman

The man who envisioned and realized such landmark buildings as the Salk Institute, the Kimbell Art Museum, and the National Assembly complex in Bangladesh, Louis Kahn was born in what is now Estonia, immigrated to America, and became one of the towering figures in his adopted country’s built world... More


Cajun Document
Acadiana, 1973-74 Douglas Baz and Charles H. Traub

For six months in 1974, two young photographers, fresh out of art school in Chicago, traveled through Cajun country, documenting the people, festivals, material culture, and haunting landscapes of Acadiana and its coastal outposts. Never before published or exhibited as a group, the 163 black-and-... More


Monumental Jesus
Landscapes of Faith and Doubt in Modern America Margaret M. Grubiak

The American landscape is host to numerous works of religious architecture, sometimes questionable in taste and large, if not titanic, in scale. In her lively study of satire and religious architecture, Margaret Grubiak challenges how we typically view such sites by shifting the focus from... More


Grant Wood's Secrets
Sue Taylor

Incorporating copious archival research and original close readings of American artist Grant Wood’s iconic as well as lesser-known works, Grant Wood’s Secrets reveals how his sometimes anguished psychology was shaped by his close relationship with his mother and how he channeled his lifelong... More


Epic Landscapes
Benjamin Henry Latrobe and the Art of Watercolor Julia A. Sienkewicz

Winner of College Art Association’s Wyeth Foundation for American Art Publication Grant Epic Landscapes is the first study devoted to architect Benjamin Henry Latrobe’s substantial artistic oeuvre from 1795, when he set sail from Britain to Virginia, to late 1798, when he relocated to Pennsylvania... More


American Autopia
An Intellectual History of the American Roadside at Midcentury Gabrielle Esperdy

Early to mid-twentieth-century America was the heyday of a car culture that has been called an "automobile utopia." In American Autopia, Gabrielle Esperdy examines how the automobile influenced architectural and urban discourse in the United States from the earliest days of the auto industry to the... More


Enigmatic Stream
Industrial Landscapes of the Lower Mississippi River Richard Sexton

As it churns toward its terminus in southeastern Louisiana, the Mississippi River becomes a wide, muddy superhighway of activity, matched in might only by the megastructures of heavy industry that line its banks. The section of the river from Baton Rouge to New Orleans doubles as one of the most... More


In the Spirit
The Photography of Michael P. Smith from the Historic New Orleans Collection The Historic New Orleans Collection

[Book description not available]


Perique
Photographs by Charles Martin Charles Martin

[Book description not available]


Buildings of Texas
East, North Central, Panhandle and South Plains, and West Gerald Moorhead. With James W. Steely, Willis C. Winters, Mark Gunderson, Jay C. Henry, and Joel Warren Barna

From Dallas–Fort Worth to El Paso, Goodnight to Marfa to Langtry, and scores of places in between, the second of two towering volumes assembled by Gerald Moorhead and a team of dedicated authors offers readers a definitive guide to the architecture of the Lone Star State. Canvassing Spanish and... More


Inhabiting the Sacred in Everyday Life
How to Design a Place That Touches Your Heart, Stirs You to Consecrate and Cultivate It as Home, Dwell Intentionally within It, Slay Monsters for It, and Let It Loose in Your Democracy Randolph T. Hester, Jr., and Amber D. Nelson

Human beings in the 21st century hunger, often unconsciously, for places to live that are more than efficient, economical machines. Inhabiting the Sacred offers sound and innovative guidance to both citizens and planning professionals who seek to transform public spaces into sites that answer not... More


The Log Cabin
An American Icon Alison K. Hoagland

For roughly a century, the log cabin occupied a central and indispensable role in the rapidly growing United States. Although it largely disappeared as a living space, it lived on as a symbol of the settling of the nation. In her thought-provoking and generously illustrated new book, Alison... More


Indoor America
The Interior Landscape of Postwar Suburbia Andrea Vesentini

Cars, single-family houses, fallout shelters, air-conditioned malls—these are only some of the many interiors making up the landscape of American suburbia. Indoor America explores the history of suburbanization through the emergence of such spaces in the postwar years, examining their design, use,... More


Stewards of Memory
The Past, Present, and Future of Historic Preservation at George Washington's Mount Vernon Edited by Carol Borchert Cadou. With Luke J. Pecoraro and Thomas A. Reinhart

Mount Vernon, despite its importance as the estate of George Washington, is subject to the same threats of time as any property and has required considerable resources and organization to endure as a historic site and house. This book provides a window into the broad scope of preservation work... More


Mountain Lake Symposium and Workshop
Art in Locale Edited by Howard Risatti and Ray Kass

Contemporary art, interdisciplinary research, traditional Appalachian culture, and advanced technology converge in The Mountain Lake Symposium and Workshop: Artists in Locale. Published to coincide with the exhibition of the same name, the book showcases the collaborative creative works that... More


Fish Town
Down the Road to Louisiana's Vanishing Fishing Communities J. T. Blatty

Fish Town is an inspired documentary project focused on preserving, through photography and oral history recordings, the cultural and environmental remains of southeastern Louisiana’s fishing communities. Owing to a dying wild-caught seafood industry and a rapidly vanishing coastline, the places... More


Environmental Design
Architecture, Politics, and Science in Postwar America Avigail Sachs

Much of twentieth-century design was animated by the creative tension of its essential duality: is design an art or a science? In the postwar era, American architects sought to calibrate architectural practice to evolving scientific knowledge about humans and environments, thus elevating the... More


Listening In
Echoes and Artifacts from Maryland's Mother County Merideth M. Taylor. Foreword by Jeffrey Hammond

St. Mary’s County is where colonial Maryland began, with the establishment of St. Mary’s City on the site of an ancient Yaocomico village as Maryland’s first capital in 1634. Southern Maryland has been home to human occupation for at least 12,000 years, and since 1634 the area has seen myriad... More


Healthy Environments, Healing Spaces
Practices and Directions in Health, Planning, and Design Edited by Timothy Beatley, Carla Jones, and Reuben Rainey

This collection of essays by leading scholars and practitioners addresses a timely and essential question: How can we design, plan, and sustain built environments that will foster health and healing? With a salutogenic (health-promoting) focus, Healthy Environments, Healing Spaces addresses a range... More


Buildings of New Orleans
Karen Kingsley and Lake Douglas

Winner of Best Guidebook Award 2019 from the Southeast Chapter of the Society of Architectural Historians"New Orleans isn’t like other cities," Stella tells her sister Blanche DuBois in Tennessee Williams’s A Streetcar Named Desire. Cradled in the crescent of the Mississippi River and surrounded by... More


Material Witnesses
Domestic Architecture and Plantation Landscapes in Early Virginia Camille Wells

The Chesapeake region of eastern Virginia and Maryland offers a wealth of evidence for readers and researchers who want to discover what life was like in early America. In this eagerly anticipated volume, Camille Wells, one of the foremost experts on eighteenth-century Virginia architecture,... More


Pages