You are here

Caribbean and African Studies


The Collected Essays of Josephine J. Turpin Washington
A Black Reformer in the Post-Reconstruction South

Josephine Turpin Washington. Edited by Rita B. Dandridge

Newspaper journalist, teacher, and social reformer, Josephine J. Turpin Washington led a life of intense engagement with the issues facing African American society in the post-Reconstruction era. This volume recovers numerous essays, many of them unavailable to the general public until now, and... More


We Face the Dawn
Oliver Hill, Spottswood Robinson, and the Legal Team That Dismantled Jim Crow

Margaret Edds

The decisive victories in the fight for racial equality in America were not easily won, much less inevitable; they were achieved through carefully conceived strategy and the work of tireless individuals dedicated to this most urgent struggle. In We Face the Dawn, Margaret Edds tells the gripping... More


Edwidge Danticat
The Haitian Diasporic Imaginary

Nadège T. Clitandre

Haitian-American writer Edwidge Danticat is one of the most recognized writers today. Her debut novel, Breath, Eyes, Memory, was an Oprah Book Club selection, and works such as Krik? Krak! and Brother, I’m Dying have earned her a MacArthur "genius" grant and National Book Award nominations. Yet... More


Dézafi


Frankétienne. Translated by Asselin Charles. Afterword by Jean Jonassaint

Dézafi is no ordinary zombie novel. In the hands of the great Haitian author known simply as Frankétienne, zombification takes on a symbolic dimension that stands as a potent commentary on a country haunted by a history of slavery. Now this dynamic new translation brings this touchstone in Haitian... More


Idle Talk, Deadly Talk
The Uses of Gossip in Caribbean Literature

Ana Rodríguez Navas

Chaucer called it "spiritual manslaughter"; Barthes and Benjamin deemed it dangerous linguistic nihilism. But gossip-long derided and dismissed by writers and intellectuals-is far from frivolous. In Idle Talk, Deadly Talk, Ana Rodríguez Navas reveals gossip to be an urgent, utilitarian, and deeply... More


Bound for Work
Labor, Mobility, and Colonial Rule in Central Mozambique, 1940-1965

Zachary Kagan Guthrie

Diverging from the studies of southern African migrant labor that focus on particular workplaces and points of origin, Bound for Work looks at the multitude of forms and locales of migrant labor that individuals—under more or less coercive circumstances—engaged in over the course of their lives.... More


Do You Hear in the Mountains... and Other Stories


Maïssa Bey. Translated by Erin Lamm. Afterword by Alison Rice

This new translation brings together two of Algerian author Maïssa Bey’s important works for the first time in English. "Do You Hear in the Mountains..." is a compelling piece of autofiction in which three destinies meet dramatically on a train moving through France. We meet an Algerian refugee,... More


Charlottesville 2017
The Legacy of Race and Inequity

Louis P. Nelson and Claudrena N. Harold.

When hate groups descended on Charlottesville, Virginia, triggering an eruption of racist violence, the tragic conflict reverberated throughout the world. It also had a profound effect on the University of Virginia’s expansive community, many of whose members are involved in teaching issues of... More


The Finger of God
Enoch Mgijima, the Israelites, and the Bulhoek Massacre in South Africa

Robert R. Edgar

On the morning of May 24, 1921, a force of eight hundred white policemen and soldiers confronted an African prophet, Enoch Mgijima, and some three thousand of his followers. Called the Israelites, they refused to leave their holy village of Ntabelanga, where they had been gathering since early 1919... More


The Cowboy Capitalist
John Hays Hammond, the American West, and the Jameson Raid in South Africa

Charles van Onselen

The Jameson Raid was a pivotal moment in the history of South Africa, linking events from the Anglo-Boer War to the declaration of the Union of South Africa in 1910. For more than a century, the failed revolution has been interpreted through the lens of British imperialism, with responsibility laid... More


I Die by This Country


Fawzia Zouari. Translated by Skyler Artes

The first novel available to English readers by Fawzia Zouari, one of the most important North African authors writing today, begins with an emergency crew’s arrival at a Parisian apartment. Two emaciated young women, sisters, are brought out on stretchers. To the crowd of onlookers the women’s... More


Richard Potter
America's First Black Celebrity

John A. Hodgson

Apart from a handful of exotic--and almost completely unreliable--tales surrounding his life, Richard Potter is almost unknown today. Two hundred years ago, however, he was the most popular entertainer in America--the first showman, in fact, to win truly nationwide fame. Working as a magician and... More


Trans-Atlantic Sojourners
The Story of an Americo-Liberian Family

M. Neely Young

Unique in its formation and in a citizenry made up largely of repatriated ex-slaves, Liberia has been the scene of a fascinating intercontinental history. Trans-Atlantic Sojourners enters this history through the experiences of one Americo-Liberian family. M. Neely Young introduces us to two... More


Historian
An Autobiography

Hermann Giliomee

In this eloquent memoir, already widely read and praised in the author’s native South Africa, Hermann Giliomee weaves together the story of his own life with that of his country--a nation that continues to absorb and inspire him, both despite and because of its tortuous history.An internationally... More


Cradock
How Segregation and Apartheid Came to a South African Town

Jeffrey Butler. Edited by Richard Elphick and Jeannette Hopkins

Cradock, the product of more than twenty years of research by Jeffrey Butler, is a vivid history of a middle-sized South African town in the years when segregation gradually emerged, preceding the rapid and rigorous implementation of apartheid. Although Butler was born and raised in Cradock, he... More


Facing Freedom
An African American Community in Virginia from Reconstruction to Jim Crow

Daniel B. Thorp

The history of African Americans in southern Appalachia after the Civil War has largely escaped the attention of scholars of both African Americans and the region. In Facing Freedom, Daniel Thorp relates the complex experience of an African American community in southern Appalachia as it negotiated... More


Black Aesthetics and the Interior Life


Christopher Freeburg

Christopher Freeburg’s  Black Aesthetics and the Interior Life offers a crucial new reading of a neglected aspect of African American literature and art across the long twentieth century. Rejecting the idea that the most dehumanizing of black experiences, such as lynching or other racial violence,... More


Crossing the Line
Early Creole Novels and Anglophone Caribbean Culture in the Age of Emancipation

Candace Ward

Crossing the Line examines a group of early nineteenth-century novels by white creoles, writers whose identities and perspectives were shaped by their experiences in Britain’s Caribbean colonies. Colonial subjects residing in the West Indian colonies "beyond the line," these writers were perceived... More


Staging Creolization
Women's Theater and Performance from the French Caribbean

Emily Sahakian

In Staging Creolization, Emily Sahakian examines seven plays by Ina Césaire, Maryse Condé, Gerty Dambury, and Simone Schwarz-Bart that premiered in the French Caribbean or in France in the 1980s and 1990s and soon thereafter traveled to the United States. Sahakian argues that these late-twentieth-... More


The Key to the Door
Experiences of Early African American Students at the University of Virginia

Edited by Maurice Apprey and Shelli M. Poe

The Key to the Door frames and highlights the stories of some of the first black students at the University of Virginia. This inspiring account of resilience and transformation offers a diversity of experiences and perspectives through first-person narratives of black students during the... More


Trustbuilding
An Honest Conversation on Race, Reconciliation, and Responsibility

Rob Corcoran. foreword by Tim Kaine

"Trustbuilding, using personal narrative and exhaustive reporting by Rob Corcoran, chronicles how Hope in the Cities has moved what looked like an immoveable barricade. The job is not done, but Hope in the Cities has provided a map for the future."—from the foreword by Governor Tim KaineThe... More


A Cultural History of Underdevelopment
Latin America in the U.S. Imagination

John Patrick Leary

A Cultural History of Underdevelopment explores the changing place of Latin America in U.S. culture from the mid-nineteenth century to the recent U.S.-Cuba détente. In doing so, it uncovers the complex ways in which Americans have imagined the global geography of poverty and progress, as the... More


American Imperialism's Undead
The Occupation of Haiti and the Rise of Caribbean Anticolonialism

Raphael Dalleo

As modern Caribbean politics and literature emerged in the first half of the twentieth century, Haiti, as the region's first independent state, stood as a source of inspiration for imagining decolonization and rooting regional identity in Africanness. Yet at precisely the same moment that... More


The Civilizations of Africa
A History to 1800

Christopher Ehret

Since its initial publication, The Civilizationsof Africa has established itself as the most authoritative text available on early African history. Addressing the glaring lack of works concentrating on earlier African eras, Christopher Ehret’s trailblazing book has been paired with histories of... More


The Risen Phoenix
Black Politics in the Post–Civil War South

Luis-Alejandro Dinnella-Borrego

The Risen Phoenix charts the changing landscape of black politics and political culture in the postwar South by focusing on the careers of six black congressmen who served between the Civil War and the turn of the nineteenth century: John Mercer Langston of Virginia, James Thomas Rapier of Alabama... More


Pages