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Caribbean and African Studies


The Key to the Door
Experiences of Early African American Students at the University of Virginia

Edited by Maurice Apprey and Shelli M. Poe

The Key to the Door frames and highlights the stories of some of the first black students at the University of Virginia. This inspiring account of resilience and transformation offers a diversity of experiences and perspectives through first-person narratives of black students during the... More


Trustbuilding
An Honest Conversation on Race, Reconciliation, and Responsibility

Rob Corcoran. foreword by Tim Kaine

"Trustbuilding, using personal narrative and exhaustive reporting by Rob Corcoran, chronicles how Hope in the Cities has moved what looked like an immoveable barricade. The job is not done, but Hope in the Cities has provided a map for the future."—from the foreword by Governor Tim KaineThe... More


A Cultural History of Underdevelopment
Latin America in the U.S. Imagination

John Patrick Leary

A Cultural History of Underdevelopment explores the changing place of Latin America in U.S. culture from the mid-nineteenth century to the recent U.S.-Cuba détente. In doing so, it uncovers the complex ways in which Americans have imagined the global geography of poverty and progress, as the... More


American Imperialism's Undead
The Occupation of Haiti and the Rise of Caribbean Anticolonialism

Raphael Dalleo

As modern Caribbean politics and literature emerged in the first half of the twentieth century, Haiti, as the region's first independent state, stood as a source of inspiration for imagining decolonization and rooting regional identity in Africanness. Yet at precisely the same moment that... More


The Civilizations of Africa
A History to 1800

Christopher Ehret

Since its initial publication, The Civilizationsof Africa has established itself as the most authoritative text available on early African history. Addressing the glaring lack of works concentrating on earlier African eras, Christopher Ehret’s trailblazing book has been paired with histories of... More


The Risen Phoenix
Black Politics in the Post–Civil War South

Luis-Alejandro Dinnella-Borrego

The Risen Phoenix charts the changing landscape of black politics and political culture in the postwar South by focusing on the careers of six black congressmen who served between the Civil War and the turn of the nineteenth century: John Mercer Langston of Virginia, James Thomas Rapier of Alabama... More


In Search of Annie Drew
Jamaica Kincaid's Mother and Muse

Daryl Cumber Dance

There is perhaps no other person who has been so often and obsessively featured in any writer’s canon as Jamaica Kincaid’s mother, Annie Drew. In this provocative new book, Daryl Dance argues that everything Kincaid has written, regardless of its apparent theme, actually relates to Kincaid’s... More


The Specter of Races
Latin American Anthropology and Literature between the Wars

Anke Birkenmaier

Arguing that race has been the specter that has haunted many of the discussions about Latin American regional and national cultures today, Anke Birkenmaier shows how theories of race and culture in Latin America evolved dramatically in the period between the two world wars. In response to the rise... More


A House Divided
Slavery and Emancipation in Delaware, 1638–1865

Patience Essah

Delaware stood outside the primary streams of New World emancipation. Despite slavery's virtual demise in that state during the antebellum years and Delaware's staunch Unionism during the Civil War itself, the state failed to ratify the Thirteenth Amendment, which prohibits slavery, until 1901.... More


Performance and Personhood in Caribbean Literature
From Alexis to the Digital Age

Jeannine Murray-Román

Focusing on the literary representation of performance practices in anglophone, francophone, and hispanophone Caribbean literature, Jeannine Murray-Román shows how a shared regional aesthetic emerges from the descriptions of music, dance, and oral storytelling events. Because the historical... More


The Leopard Boy


Daniel Picouly. Translated by Jeanne Garane. Afterword by Jeanne M. Garane

October 15, 1793: the eve of Marie-Antoinette’s execution. The Reign of Terror has descended upon revolutionary France, and thousands are beheaded daily under the guillotine. Edmond Coffin and Jonathan Gravedigger, two former soldiers now employed in disposing of the dead, are hired to search the... More


Memory at Bay


Evelyne Trouillot. Translated by Paul Curtis Daw. Afterword by Jason Herbeck

Winner of the prestigious Prix Carbet--an award won by such distinguished authors as Maryse Condé, Jamaica Kincaid, and Raphaël Confiant-- Memory at Bay is now available in an English translation that brings to life this powerful novel by one of Haiti’s most vital authors, Évelyne Trouillot.... More


Tropical Apocalypse
Haiti and the Caribbean End Times

Martin Munro

In Tropical Apocalypse, Martin Munro argues that since the earliest days of European colonization, Caribbean—and especially Haitian—history has been shaped by apocalyptic events so that the region has, in effect, been living for centuries in an end time without end. By engaging with the... More


Arabic as a Secret Song


Leïla Sebbar. Translated by Skyler Artes. Afterword by Mildred Mortimer

The celebrated and highly versatile writer Leïla Sebbar was born in French colonial Algeria but has lived nearly her entire adult life in France, where she is recognized as a major voice on the penetrating effects of colonialism in contemporary society. The dramatic contrast between her past and... More


Market Aesthetics
The Purchase of the Past in Caribbean Diasporic Fiction

Elena Machado Sáez

In Market Aesthetics, Elena Machado Sáez explores the popularity of Caribbean diasporic writing within an interdisciplinary, comparative, and pan-ethnic framework. She contests established readings of authors such as Junot Díaz, Julia Alvarez, Edwidge Danticat, and Robert Antoni while showcasing... More


Eric Williams and the Anticolonial Tradition
The Making of a Diasporan Intellectual

Maurice St. Pierre

A leader in the social movement that achieved Trinidad and Tobago’s independence from Britain in 1962, Eric Williams (1911–1981) served as its first prime minister. Although much has been written about Williams as a historian and a politician, Maurice St. Pierre is the first to offer a full-length... More


The Pan American Imagination
Contested Visions of the Hemisphere in Twentieth-Century Literature

Stephen M. Park

In the history of the early twentieth-century Americas, visions of hemispheric unity flourished, and the notion of a transnational American identity was embraced by artists, intellectuals, and government institutions. In The Pan American Imagination, Stephen Park explores the work of several Pan... More


Journeys of the Slave Narrative in the Early Americas


Edited by Nicole N. Aljoe and Ian Finseth

Focusing on slave narratives from the Atlantic world of the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, this interdisciplinary collection of essays suggests the importance—even the necessity—of looking beyond the iconic and ubiquitous works of Olaudah Equiano, Frederick Douglass, and Harriet Jacobs... More


The Other Side of the Sea


Louis-Philippe Dalembert. Translated by Robert H. McCormick Jr. Foreword by Edwidge Danticat

The Other Side of the Sea, the first novel by this major Haitian author to be translated into English, is riveted on the other shore--whether it is the ancestral Africa that still haunts Haitians, the America to which so many have emigrated, or even that final shore, the uncertain afterlife... More


Locating the Destitute
Space and Identity in Caribbean Fiction

Stanka Radović

While postcolonial discourse in the Caribbean has drawn attention to colonialism’s impact on space and spatial hierarchy, Stanka Radović asks both how ordinary people as "users" of space have been excluded from active and autonomous participation in shaping their daily spatial reality and how they... More


The Fury and Cries of Women


Angèle Rawiri. Translated by Sara Hanaburgh. Afterword by Cheryl Toman

Gabon’s first female novelist, Angèle Rawiri probed deeper into the issues that writers a generation before her—Mariama Bâ and Aminata Sow Fall—had begun to address. Translated by Sara Hanaburgh, this third novel of the three Rawiri published is considered the richest of her fictional prose. It... More


A World of Their Own
A History of South African Women’s Education

Meghan Healy-Clancy

The politics of black education has long been a key issue in southern African studies, but despite rich debates on the racial and class dimensions of schooling, historians have neglected their distinctive gendered dynamics. A World of Their Own is the first book to explore the meanings of black... More


Bodies and Bones
Feminist Rehearsal and Imagining Caribbean Belonging

Tanya L. Shields

In Bodies and Bones, Tanya Shields argues that a repeated engagement with the Caribbean’s iconic and historic touchstones offers a new sense of (inter)national belonging that brings an alternative and dynamic vision to the gendered legacy of brutality against black bodies, flesh, and bone. Using a... More


Far from My Father


Véronique Tadjo. Translated by Amy Baram Reid. Afterword by Amy Baram Reid

"To attain some sort of universal value," Véronique Tadjo has said, "a piece of work has to go deep into the particular in order to reveal our shared humanity." In Far from My Father, the latest novel from this internationally acclaimed author, a woman returns to the Côte d'Ivoire after her father’... More


Sounding the Break
African American and Caribbean Routes of World Literature

Jason Frydman

The idea of "world literature" has served as a crucial though underappreciated interlocutor for African diasporic writers, informing their involvement in processes of circulation, translation, and revision that have been identified as the hallmarks of the contemporary era of world literature. Yet... More


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