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Caribbean and African Studies


One Love, Ghoema Beat
Inside the Cape Town Carnival

John Edwin Mason

One Love, Ghoema Beat: Inside the Cape Town Carnival takes readers behind the scenes of one of the world’s least known and most colorful carnivals. Similar in many ways to Mardi Gras in New Orleans and Carnival in Rio de Janeiro, the Cape Town Carnival is unique in its history, which is rooted in... More


The Rise and Fall of Apartheid


David Welsh

On his way into Parliament on February 2, 1990, F. W. de Klerk turned to his wife Marike and said, referring to his forthcoming speech: "South Africa will never be the same again after this." Did white South Africa crack, or did its leadership yield sufficiently and just in time to avert a... More


Beyond the Royal Gaze
Clanship and Public Healing in Buganda

Neil Kodesh

Winner of the 2011 African Studies Association Herskovits Award Beyond the Royal Gaze shifts the perspective from which we view early African politics by asking what Buganda, a kingdom located on the northwest shores of Lake Victoria in present-day Uganda, looked like to people who were not of the... More


The Afrikaners
Biography of a People

Hermann Giliomee

This book is a biography of the Afrikaner people. A historian and journalist who was one of the earliest and staunchest Afrikaner opponents of apartheid, Hermann Giliomee weaves together life stories and historical interpretation to create a narrative history of the Afrikaners from their beginnings... More


Aunt Résia and the Spirits and Other Stories


Yanick Lahens. Translated by Betty Wilson. Foreword by Edwidge Danticat. Introduction by Marie-Agnès Sourieau

The Haiti of Yanick Lahens's path-breaking short fiction is a country demanding our compassion as it reveals to us its horrors. For decades among the forefront of Haitian writers, Lahens has embarked on a renewal of the genre of short stories that she inherited from Caribbean—and especially Haitian... More


Caribbean Perspectives on Modernity
Returning Medusa's Gaze

Maria Cristina Fumagalli

Taking up the challenge of redefining modernity from a Caribbean perspective instead of assuming that the North Atlantic view of modernity is universal, Maria Cristina Fumagalli shows how the Caribbean's contributions to the modern world not only provide a more accurate account of the past but also... More


Exhibiting Slavery
The Caribbean Postmodern Novel as Museum

Vivian Nun Halloran

Exhibiting Slavery examines the ways in which Caribbean postmodern historical novels about slavery written in Spanish, English, and French function as virtual museums, simultaneously showcasing and curating a collection of "primary documents" within their pages. As Vivian Nun Halloran attests,... More


Friends for Life, Friends for Death
Cohorts and Consciousness among the Lunda-Ndembu

James A. Pritchett

Breaking away from traditional ethnographic accounts often limited by theoretical frameworks and rhetorical styles, Friends for Life, Friends for Death offers an insider’s view into the day-to-day lives of a self-selected group of male friends within the Lunda-Ndembu society in northwestern Zambia... More


Strategies for Survival
Recollections of Bondage in Antebellum Virginia

William Dusinberre

Strategies for Survival conveys the experience of bondage through the words of former slaves themselves. The interviews—conducted in Virginia in 1937 by WPA interviewers—are considered among the most valuable of the WPA interviews because in Virginia the interviewers were almost all African... More


Transatlantic Solidarities
Irish Nationalism and Caribbean Poetics

Michael G. Malouf

Despite their prominent place in twentieth-century literature in English, novelists and poets from Ireland and the anglophone Caribbean have long been separated by literary histories in which they are either representing a local, nationalist tradition or functioning within an international movement... More


I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem


Maryse Condé

This wild and entertaining novel expands on the true story of the West Indian slave Tituba, who was accused of witchcraft in Salem, Massachusetts, arrested in 1692, and forgotten in jail until the general amnesty for witches two years later. Maryse Condé brings Tituba out of historical silence and... More


Universal Emancipation
The Haitian Revolution and the Radical Enlightenment

Nick Nesbitt

Unlike the American and French Revolutions, the Haitian Revolution was the first in a modern state to implement human rights universally and unconditionally. Going well beyond the selective emancipation of white adult male property owners, the Haitian Revolution is of vital importance, Nick Nesbitt... More


Art and Revolution
The Life and Death of Thami Mnyele, South African Artist

Diana Wylie

Thami Mnyele's life spanned the era of apartheid. He was born the same year the National Party won office and came of age in a time (the 1960s) and a place (Johannesburg) that offered a sensitive young black artist little encouragement. In 1985, in the waning days of apartheid, he was killed by... More


Soon Come
Jamaican Spirituality, Jamaican Poetics

Hugh Hodges

Soon Come celebrates Jamaican poetry as an expression and extension of the island’s rich spiritual traditions, offering fresh insights into some of the late twentieth century’s most important and influential poetry. Drawing inspiration from the history of Myal, Kumina, Revivalism, and Rastafari,... More


Signs of Dissent
Maryse Condé and Postcolonial Criticism

Dawn Fulton

Maryse Condé is a Guadeloupean writer and critic whose work has challenged the categories of race, language, gender, and geography that inform contemporary literary and critical debates. In Signs of Dissent, the first full-length study in English on Condé, Dawn Fulton situates this award-winning... More


Tree of Liberty
Cultural Legacies of the Haitian Revolution in the Atlantic World

Doris L. Garraway, ed.

On January 1, 1804, Jean-Jacques Dessalines declared the independence of Haiti, thus bringing to an end the only successful slave revolution in history and transforming the colony of Saint-Domingue into the second independent state in the Western Hemisphere. The historical significance of the... More


The Abandoned Baobab
The Autobiography of a Senegalese Woman

Ken Bugul. Translated by Marjolijn de Jager. With an introduction by Jeanne Garane

The subject of intense admiration--and not a little shock, when it was first published--The Abandoned Baobab has consistently captivated readers ever since. The book has been translated into numerous languages and was chosen by QBR Black Book Review as one of Africa’s 100 best books of the... More


States of Violence
Politics, Youth, and Memory in Contemporary Africa

Edna G. Bay and Donald L. Donham, eds.

The essayists whose work is collected here -- historians, anthropologists, and political scientists -- bring their diverse disciplinary perspectives to bear on various forms of violence that have plagued recent African history. Exploring violence as part of political economy and rejecting... More


Second Arrivals
Landscape and Belonging in Contemporary Writing of the Americas

Sarah Phillips Casteel

Diaspora studies have tended to privilege urban landscapes over rural ones, wanting to avoid the racial homogeneity, conservatism, and xenophobia usually associated with the latter. In Second Arrivals: Landscape and Belonging in Contemporary Writing of the Americas, Sarah Phillips Casteel examines... More


Orphan Narratives
The Postplantation Literature of Faulkner, Glissant, Morrison, and Saint-John Perse

Valérie Loichot

In Orphan Narratives, Valérie Loichot investigates the fiction and poetry of four writers who emerged from the postslavery plantation world of the Americas—William Faulkner (USA), Édouard Glissant (Martinique), Toni Morrison (USA), and Saint-John Perse (Guadeloupe)—to show how these descendants... More


Just Below South
Intercultural Performance in the Caribbean and the U.S. South

Jessica Adams, Michael P. Bibler, and Cécile Accilien, eds.

Just Below South is the first book to examine the U.S. South and the Caribbean as a "regional interculture" shaped by performance--as a space defined not so much by a shared set of geographical boundaries or by a single, common culture as by the weave of performances and identities moving across... More


The Segregated Scholars
Black Social Scientists and the Creation of Black Labor Studies, 1890–1950

Francille Rusan Wilson

In Segregated Scholars Francille Rusan Wilson explores the lives and work of fifteen black labor historians and social scientists as seen through the prisms of gender, class, and time. This collective biography offers complex and vital portraits of these seminal figures, many of whom knew and... More


Writing Rumba
The Afrocubanista Movement in Poetry

Miguel Arnedo-Gómez

Arising in the heyday of the music recently made famous by the Buena Vista Social Club, afrocubanismo was an artistic and intellectual movement in Cuba in the 1920s and 1930s that tried to convey a national and racial identity. Through poetry, this movement was the first serious attempt on the part... More


Dog Days
An Animal Chronicle

Patrice Nganang. Translated by Amy Reid

"I am a dog," the narrator of Patrice Nganang's novel plainly informs us. As such, he has learned not to expect too much from life. He can, however, observe the life around him—in his case the impoverished but dynamic Cameroon of the early 1990s, a time known as les années de braise (the smoldering... More


Guarding Cultural Memory
Afro-Cuban Women in Literature and the Arts

Flora González Mandri

In Guarding Cultural Memory, Flora González Mandri examines the vibrant and uniquely illuminating post-Revolutionary creative endeavors of Afro-Cuban women. Taking on the question of how African diaspora cultures practice remembrance, she reveals the ways in which these artists restage the... More


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