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Environmental Studies


Magnificent Decay
Melville and Ecology Tom Nurmi

What is Melville beyond the whale? Long celebrated for his stories of the sea, Melville was also fascinated by the interrelations between living species and planetary systems, a perspective informing his work in ways we now term "ecological." By reading Melville in the context of nineteenth-century... More


Black Landscapes Matter
Edited by Walter Hood and Grace Mitchell Tada.

The question "Do black landscapes matter?" cuts deep to the core of American history. From the plantations of slavery to contemporary segregated cities, from freedman villages to northern migrations for freedom, the nation’s landscape bears the detritus of diverse origins. Black landscapes matter... More


The Delaware Naturalist Handbook
Edited by McKay Jenkins and Susan Barton

The Delaware Naturalist Handbook is the primary public face of a major university-led public educational outreach and community engagement initiative. This statewide master naturalist certification program is designed to train hundreds of citizen scientists, K–12 environmental educators,... More


Traces of J. B. Jackson
The Man Who Taught Us to See Everyday America Helen L. Horowitz

J. B. Jackson transformed forever how Americans understand their landscape, a concept he defined as land shaped by human presence. In the first major biography of the greatest pioneer in landscape studies, Helen Horowitz shares with us a man who focused on what he regarded as the essential American... More


New Woman Ecologies
From Arts and Crafts to the Great War and Beyond Alicia Carroll

A transatlantic phenomenon of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the "New Woman" broke away from many of the constraints of the Victorian era to enjoy a greater freedom of movement in the social, physical, and intellectual realms. As Alicia Carroll reveals, the New Woman also played... More


Of Land, Bones, and Money
Toward a South African Ecopoetics Emily McGiffin

The South African literature of iimbongi, the oral poets of the amaXhosa people, has long shaped understandings of landscape and history and offered a forum for grappling with change. Of Land, Bones, and Money examines the shifting role of these poets in South African society and the ways in which... More


Quantitative Methods in the Humanities
An Introduction Claire Lemercier and Claire Zalc. Translated by Arthur Goldhammer

This timely and lucid guide is intended for students and scholars working on all historical periods and topics in the humanities and social sciences--especially for those who do not think of themselves as experts in quantification, "big data," or "digital humanities."The authors reveal... More


Evergreen Ash
Ecology and Catastrophe in Old Norse Myth and Literature Christopher Abram

Norse mythology is obsessed with the idea of an onrushing and unstoppable apocalypse: Ragnarok, when the whole of creation will perish in fire, smoke, and darkness and the earth will no longer support the life it once nurtured. Most of the Old Norse texts that preserve the myths of Ragnarok... More


Greening the City
Urban Landscapes in the Twentieth Century Edited by Dorothee Brantz and Sonja Duempelmann

The modern city is not only pavement and concrete. Parks, gardens, trees, and other plants are an integral part of the urban environment. Often the focal points of social movements and political interests, green spaces represent far more than simply an effort to balance the man-made with the... More


Darwin's Fox and My Coyote
Holly Menino

A rare fox in the South American cordillera. A disappearing fox on an island off California. A common coyote in the Albany suburbs. How do these wild carnivores live? And what is it about the places they live that allows them to survive? Holly Menino joins up with three young scientists to find out... More


Shaping the Postwar Landscape
New Profiles from the Pioneers of American Landscape Design Project Edited by Charles A. Birnbaum and Scott Craver

Shaping the Postwar Landscape is the latest contribution to the Cultural Landscape Foundation’s well-known reference project, Pioneers of American Landscape Design, the first volume of which appeared nearly a quarter of a century ago. The present collection features profiles of seventy-two... More


Earth Repair
A Transatlantic History of Environmental Restoration Marcus Hall

Just as the restoration of Michelangelo’s Last Judgment sparked enormous controversy in the art world, so are environmental restorationists intensely divided when it comes to finding ways to rehabilitate damaged ecosystems. Although environmental restoration is quickly becoming a widespread pursuit... More


Italy and the Environmental Humanities
Landscapes, Natures, Ecologies Edited by Serenella Iovino, Enrico Cesaretti, and Elena Past

Bringing together new writing by some of the field’s most compelling voices from the United States and Europe, this is the first book to examine Italy--as a territory of both matter and imagination--through the lens of the environmental humanities. The contributors offer a wide spectrum of... More


The Wild Within
Histories of a Landmark British Zoo Andrew Flack

Established in 1836, the Bristol Zoo is the world’s oldest surviving zoo outside of a capital city and has frequently been at the vanguard of zoo innovation. In The Wild Within, Andrew Flack uses the experiences of the Bristol Zoo to explore the complex and ever-changing relationship between human... More


Recomposing Ecopoetics
North American Poetry of the Self-Conscious Anthropocene Lynn Keller

In the first book devoted exclusively to the ecopoetics of the twenty-first century, Lynn Keller examines poetry of what she terms the "self-conscious Anthropocene," a period in which there is widespread awareness of the scale and severity of human effects on the planet. Recomposing Ecopoetics... More


Building Natures
Modern American Poetry, Landscape Architecture, and City Planning Julia Daniel

In Building Natures, Julia Daniel establishes the influence of landscape architecture, city planning, and parks management on American poetry to show how modernists engaged with the green worlds and social playgrounds created by these new professions in the early twentieth century. The modern poets... More


In Pursuit of Wild Edibles
A Forager's Tour Jeffrey Greene

Today we care about the source of our food as much as the preparation, so it is no surprise that foodies have discovered wild edibles. From the most upscale restaurants in New York to humble farm stays in Europe, chefs and restaurant-goers alike are seeking pleasure in food found in the wild. In... More


Genealogies of Environmentalism
The Lost Works of Clarence Glacken Clarence Glacken. Edited by S. Ravi Rajan. With Adam Romero and Michael Watts

Clarence Glacken wrote one of the most important books on environmental issues published in the twentieth century. His magnum opus, Traces on the Rhodian Shore, first published in 1967, details the ways in which perceptions of the natural environment have profoundly influenced human enterprise over... More


The Camaro in the Pasture
Speculations on the Cultural Landscape of America Robert B. Riley

Robert Riley has been a renowned figure in landscape studies for over fifty years, valued for his perceptive, learned, and highly entertaining articles, reviews, and essays. Much of Riley’s work originally ran in Landscape, the pioneering magazine at which Riley succeeded the great geographer J. B... More


Virginia Climate Fever
How Global Warming Will Transform Our Cities, Shorelines, and Forests Stephen Nash

Climate disruption is often discussed on a global scale, affording many a degree of detachment from what is happening in their own backyards. Yet the consequences of global warming are of an increasingly acute and serious nature.In Virginia Climate Fever, environmental journalist Stephen Nash... More


Challenge of the Big Trees
The Updated History of Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks William C. Tweed and Lary M. Dilsaver

Beginning in 1872 with the establishment of Yellowstone, national parks were set aside to preserve for future generations the most spectacular and inspirational features of the country. The best representative examples were sought out of major ecosystems, such as Yosemite, geologic forms, such as... More


Preserving the Desert
A History of Joshua Tree National Park Lary M. Dilsaver

National parks are different from other federal lands in the United States. Beginning in 1872 with the establishment of Yellowstone, they were largely set aside to preserve for future generations the most spectacular and inspirational features of the country, seeking the best representative... More


Foreign Trends in American Gardens
A History of Exchange, Adaptation, and Reception Raffaella Fabiani Giannetto

Foreign Trends in American Gardens addresses the influence of foreign, designed landscapes on the development of their American counterparts. Including essays from an array of significant scholars in landscape studies, this collection examines topics ranging from the importation of Western and... More


"The Best Read Naturalist"
Nature Writings of Ralph Waldo Emerson Ralph Waldo Emerson. Edited by Michael P. Branch and Clinton Mohs

Ralph Waldo Emerson is one of the most important figures in American nature writing, yet until now readers have had no book devoted to this central theme in his work. "The Best Read Naturalist" fills this lacuna, placing several of Emerson’s lesser-known pieces of nature writing in conversation... More


Easy On, Easy Off
The Urban Pathology of America's Small Towns Jack Williams

Life outside our nation’s big cities comprises a remarkably rich aspect of America—culturally, historically, and physically. Because of the way we move through the country, however—on roads built for maximum expediency—most of us are rarely if ever exposed to these small communities, a trend that... More


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