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Environmental Studies


Challenge of the Big Trees

The Updated History of Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks William C. Tweed and Lary M. Dilsaver

Beginning in 1872 with the establishment of Yellowstone, national parks were set aside to preserve for future generations the most spectacular and inspirational features of the country. The best representative examples were sought out of major ecosystems, such as Yosemite, geologic forms, such as... More


Preserving the Desert

A History of Joshua Tree National Park Lary M. Dilsaver

National parks are different from other federal lands in the United States. Beginning in 1872 with the establishment of Yellowstone, they were largely set aside to preserve for future generations the most spectacular and inspirational features of the country, seeking the best representative... More


Foreign Trends in American Gardens

A History of Exchange, Adaptation, and Reception Raffaella Fabiani Giannetto

Foreign Trends in American Gardens addresses the influence of foreign, designed landscapes on the development of their American counterparts. Including essays from an array of significant scholars in landscape studies, this collection examines topics ranging from the importation of Western and... More


"The Best Read Naturalist"

Nature Writings of Ralph Waldo Emerson Ralph Waldo Emerson. Edited by Michael P. Branch and Clinton Mohs

Ralph Waldo Emerson is one of the most important figures in American nature writing, yet until now readers have had no book devoted to this central theme in his work. "The Best Read Naturalist" fills this lacuna, placing several of Emerson’s lesser-known pieces of nature writing in conversation... More


Easy On, Easy Off

The Urban Pathology of America's Small Towns Jack Williams

Life outside our nation’s big cities comprises a remarkably rich aspect of America—culturally, historically, and physically. Because of the way we move through the country, however—on roads built for maximum expediency—most of us are rarely if ever exposed to these small communities, a trend that... More


Garden Legacy

Mary Louise Mossy Cristovich

[Book description not available]


Cartooning the Landscape

Chip Sullivan

One of the singular talents in landscape design, Chip Sullivan has shared his expertise through a seemingly unusual medium that, at second glance, makes perfect sense--the comic strip. For years Sullivan entertained readers of Landscape Architecture Magazine with comic strips that ingeniously... More


National Park Roads

A Legacy in the American Landscape Timothy Davis

From Acadia and Great Smoky Mountains to Zion and Mount Rainier, millions of visitors tour America’s national parks. While park roads determine what most visitors see and how they see it, however, few pause to consider when, why, or how the roads they travel on were built. In this extensively... More


The Sky of Our Manufacture

The London Fog in British Fiction from Dickens to Woolf Jesse Oak Taylor

The smoke-laden fog of London is one of the most vivid elements in English literature, richly suggestive and blurring boundaries between nature and society in compelling ways. In The Sky of Our Manufacture, Jesse Oak Taylor uses the many depictions of the London fog in the late nineteenth- and... More


Community-Based Collaboration

Bridging Socio-Ecological Research and Practice edited by E. Franklin Dukes, Karen E. Firehock, and Juliana E. Birkhoff

The debate over the value of community-based environmental collaboration is one that dominates current discussions of the management of public lands and other resources. In Community-Based Collaboration: Bridging Socio-Ecological Research and Practice, the volume’s contributors offer an in-depth... More


Drawn to Landscape

The Pioneering Work of J. B. Jackson Edited by Janet Mendelsohn and Christopher Wilson

From 1951 to 1969, John Brinckerhoff (J. B.) Jackson founded, edited, and published Landscape, a magazine that changed the way scholars, writers, teachers, designers, planners, and artists came to understand the everyday places that surround us and influence us in fundamental ways. Then, as a... More


Cornelia Hahn Oberlander

Making the Modern Landscape Susan Herrington. Foreword by Marc Treib

Cornelia Hahn Oberlander is one of the most important landscape architects of the twentieth century, yet despite her lasting influence, few outside the field know her name. Her work has been instrumental in the development of the late-twentieth-century design ethic, and her early years working with... More


Primates in the Real World

Escaping Primate Folklore and Creating Primate Science Georgina M. Montgomery

The opening of this vital new book centers on a series of graves memorializing baboons killed near Amboseli National Park in Kenya in 2009--a stark image that emphasizes both the close emotional connection between primate researchers and their subjects and the intensely human qualities of the... More


The Significance of Territory

Jean Gottman

Over her thirty-year study of the concept of territory, Jean Gottmann has seen its significance evolve in a wide variety of ways throughout the world. Factors that influence the attitude of people toward their territory involve studies of geography, politics, and economics of a region. The... More


The General in the Garden

George Washington's Landscape at Mount Vernon Edited by Susan P. Schoelwer

The General in the Garden provides an engaging, informative, and richly illustrated introduction to George Washington’s landscape at Mount Vernon—arguably the best-documented, best-preserved complex of gardens and grounds to survive from eighteenth-century America.The book’s three essays, by Adam... More


Anthropocene Fictions

The Novel in a Time of Climate Change Adam Trexler

Since the Industrial Revolution, humans have transformed the Earth’s atmosphere, committing our planet to more extreme weather, rising sea levels, melting polar ice caps, and mass extinction. This period of observable human impact on the Earth’s ecosystems has been called the Anthropocene Age. The... More


The Last Launch

Messages in the Bottle Yi-Fu Tuan

Yi-Fu Tuan, one of the world’s most honored scholars and the founder of humanist geography, has spent a lifetime exploring the relationship between the places and spaces that surround us and the inner self. In particular, his writings have focused on what it means to achieve human dignity within... More


At Home and Astray

The Domestic Dog in Victorian Britain Philip Howell

Although the British consider themselves a nation of dog lovers, what we have come to know as the modern dog came into existence only after a profound, and relatively recent, transformation in that country’s social attitudes and practices. In At Home and Astray, Philip Howell focuses on Victorian... More


The Most Defiant Devil

William Temple Hornaday and His Controversial Crusade to Save American Wildlife Gregory J. Dehler

The late nineteenth and early twentieth century were a brutal time for American wildlife, with many species pushed to the brink of extinction. (Some are endangered to this day.) And yet these decades also saw the dawn of the conservationist movement. Into this contradictory era came William Temple... More


Dancing with Disaster

Environmental Histories, Narratives, and Ethics for Perilous Times Kate Rigby

The calamitous impacts of climate change that are beginning to be felt around the world today expose the inextricability of human and natural histories. Arguing for a more complex account of such calamities, Kate Rigby examines a variety of past disasters, from the Black Death of the Middle Ages to... More


Landscape and Images

John R. Stilgoe

John Stilgoe is just looking around. This is more difficult than it sounds, particularly in our mediated age, when advances in both theory and technology too often seek to replace the visual evidence before our own eyes rather than complement it. We are surrounded by landscapes charged with our... More


A Year in Rock Creek Park

The Wild, Wooded Heart of Washington, DC Melanie Choukas-Bradley. Photographs by Susan Austin Roth

2015 IPPY Silver Medalist, Best Mid-Atlantic NonfictionTwice the size of Central Park, Rock Creek Park is the wild, wooded heart of Washington, DC, offering refuge from a frantic city pace to millions of visitors each year. Rock Creek Valley, which serves as the spine of the national park, has a... More


Flights of Imagination

Aviation, Landscape, Design Sonja Dümpelmann

In much the same way that views of the earth from the Apollo missions in the late 1960s and early 1970s led indirectly to the inauguration of Earth Day and the modern environmental movement, the dawn of aviation ushered in a radically new way for architects, landscape designers, urban planners,... More


Different Shades of Green

African Literature, Environmental Justice, and Political Ecology Byron Caminero-Santangelo

Engaging important discussions about social conflict, environmental change, and imperialism in Africa, Different Shades of Green points to legacies of African environmental writing, often neglected as a result of critical perspectives shaped by dominant Western conceptions of nature and... More


To Pass On a Good Earth

The Life and Work of Carl O. Sauer Michael Williams. With David Lowenthal and William M. Denevan

To Pass On a Good Earth is the candid and compelling new biography of one of the twentieth century’s most distinctive and influential scholars. The legendary "Great God beyond the Sierras," Carl Ortwin Sauer is America’s most famed geographer, an inspiration to both academics and poets, yet no... More


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