You are here

Environmental Studies


Wild Dog Dreaming

Love and Extinction


Deborah Bird Rose

We are living in the midst of the Earth’s sixth great extinction event, the first one caused by a single species: our own. In Wild Dog Dreaming, Deborah Bird Rose explores what constitutes an ethical relationship with nonhuman others in this era of loss. She asks, Who are we, as a species? How do... More


World's Fair Gardens

Shaping American Landscapes


Cathy Jean Maloney

As showcases for dramatic changes in garden style and new technology, world’s fairs offered leading landscape designers and nurserymen the chance to tempt visitors to try new garden trends in backyards across the nation. From horticultural innovations to new landscape styles, the wonders displayed... More


The Golden-Bristled Boar

Last Ferocious Beast of the Forest


Jeffrey Greene

The wild boar appears to us as something straight out of a myth. But as Jeffrey Greene learned, these creatures are very real, living by night and, despite shrinking habitats and hordes of hunters, thriving on six continents. Greene purchased an eighteenth-century presbytery in a region of ponds... More


Pilgrimage to Vallombrosa

From Vermont to Italy in the Footsteps of George Perkins Marsh


John Elder

"Set aside your Bella Tuscanys and Year in Provences for a different kind of travel book. Pilgrimage to Vallombrosa puts a walking stick in your hand and Marsh’s Man and Nature in your knapsack, exploring how Italians have managed their natural and cultural heritage in ways that sustain both. John... More


Imagining Mount Athos

Visions of a Holy Place, from Homer to World War II


Veronica della Dora. Foreword by David Lowenthal

For more than one thousand years the monastic republic of Mount Athos has been one of the most chronicled and yet least accessible places in the Mediterranean. Difficult to reach until the last century and strictly restricted to male visitors only, the Holy Mountain of Orthodoxy has been known in... More


William Wordsworth and the Ecology of Authorship

The Roots of Environmentalism in Nineteenth-Century Culture


Scott Hess

In William Wordsworth and the Ecology of Authorship, Scott Hess explores Wordsworth’s defining role in establishing what he designates as "the ecology of authorship": a primarily middle-class, nineteenth-century conception of nature associated with aesthetics, high culture, individualism, and... More


The Maximum of Wilderness

The Jungle in the American Imagination


Kelly Enright

Danger in the Congo! The unexplored Amazon! Long perceived as a place of mystery and danger, and more recently as a fragile system requiring our protection, the tropical forest captivated America for over a century. In The Maximum of Wilderness, Kelly Enright traces the representation of tropical... More


Noble Cows and Hybrid Zebras

Essays on Animals and History


Harriet Ritvo

Over the past two decades, Harriet Ritvo has established herself as a leading scholar in animal studies and one of those most responsible for establishing this field of study as a crucial part of environmental and social history. Her two well-known books, The Platypus and the Mermaid and The Animal... More


Postcolonial Green

Environmental Politics and World Narratives


Edited by Bonnie Roos and Alex Hunt

Postcolonial Green brings together scholarship bridging ecocriticism and postcolonialism. Since its inception, ecocriticism has been accused of being inattentive to the complexities that colonialism poses for ideas of nature and environmentalism. Postcolonial discourse, on the other hand, has been... More


The Illusory Boundary

Environment and Technology in History


Edited by Martin Reuss and Stephen H. Cutcliffe

The view of nature and technology inhabiting totally different, even opposite, spheres persists across time and cultures. Most people would consider an English countryside or a Louisiana bayou to be "natural," though each is to an extent the product of technology. Pollution, widely thought to be a... More


Framing the World

Explorations in Ecocriticism and Film


Edited by Paula Willoquet-Maricondi

The essays in this collection make a contribution to the greening of film studies and expand the scope of ecocriticism as a discipline traditionally rooted in literary studies. In addition to highlighting particular films as productive tools for raising awareness and educating us about... More


Beastly Natures

Animals, Humans, and the Study of History


edited by Dorothee Brantz

Although the animal may be, as Nietzsche argued, ahistorical, living completely in the present, it nonetheless plays a crucial role in human history. The fascination with animals that leads not only to a desire to observe and even live alongside them, but to capture or kill them, is found in all... More


America's Wetland

An Environmental and Cultural History of Tidewater Virginia and North Carolina


Roy T. Sawyer

The geologically ancient Tidewater region of southeastern Virginia and northeastern North Carolina rests precariously atop millions of years of erosion from the nearby Appalachian Mountains. An immense wetland at near sea level, it is host to every conceivable body of fresh water, ranging from... More


A Many-Colored Glass

Reflections on the Place of Life in the Universe


Freeman J. Dyson

Freeman Dyson’s latest book does not attempt to bring together all of the celebrated physicist’s thoughts on science and technology into a unified theory. The emphasis is, instead, on the myriad ways in which the universe presents itself to us--and how, as observers and participants in its... More


Melodramatic Landscapes

Urban Parks in the Nineteenth Century


Heath Schenker

During the nineteenth century, large, naturalistic urban parks began to appear in cities around the world. These parks, as Melodramatic Landscapes engagingly demonstrates, offered the opportunity for visitors to assert their social status in performances suited to the theatrical age in which they... More


Shaping the American Landscape

New Profiles from the Pioneers of American Landscape Design Project


Charles A. Birnbaum and Stephanie Foell, eds.

Shaping the American Landscape explores the lives and work of 151 professionals who quite literally shaped both the land itself and our ideas of what the American landscape means. Although the contributors consider many important figures from the past, the book breaks new ground by including... More


Garbage In, Garbage Out

Solving the Problems with Long-Distance Trash Transport


Vivian E. Thomson

Your garbage is going places you’d never imagine. What used to be sent to the local dump now may move hundreds of miles by truck and barge to its final resting place. Virtually all forms of pollution migrate, subjected to natural forces such as wind and water currents. The movement of garbage,... More


The Barking Tree Frog and Other Curious Tales



Diane C. Tennant

Here’s something that doesn’t happen every millennium: Roughly 35 million years ago, a stray meteorite dropped out of the sky over Virginia and left an impact that helped shape one of the continent’s most distinctive coastlines. This scene of cataclysmic violence now lies beneath the calm waters of... More


Historic Virginia Gardens

Preservation Work of The Garden Club of Virginia, 1975–2007


Margaret Page Bemiss. Photography by Roger Foley

For more than seventy-five years, The Garden Club of Virginia has undertaken garden research and preservation work at numerous historic sites across the Old Dominion, restoring and creating beautiful landscapes for the education and enjoyment of all, from backyard gardeners to design professionals... More


City Trees

A Historical Geography from the Renaissance through the Nineteenth Century


Henry W. Lawrence

For those who have ever wondered why we have trees in cities or what makes the layout of cities like Paris and Amsterdam seem so memorable, City Trees: A Historical Geography from the Renaissance through the Nineteenth Century by Henry W. Lawrence provides a comprehensive and handsome guide to the... More


What's Bugging You?

A Fond Look at the Animals We Love to Hate


Arthur V. Evans

We are told from the time we are children that insects and spiders are pests, when the truth is that most have little or no effect on us--although the few that do are often essential to our existence. Arthur Evans suggests we take a closer look at our slapped-at, stepped-on, and otherwise ignored... More


Out of the Shadow

Ecopsychology, Story, and Encounters with the Land


Rinda West

In western culture, the separation of humans from nature has contributed to a schism between the conscious reason and the unconscious dreaming psyche, or internal human "nature." Our increasing lack of intimacy with the land has led to a decreased capacity to access parts of the psyche not normally... More


Lifeboat



John R. Stilgoe

The fire extinguisher; the airline safety card; the lifeboat. Until September 11, 2001, most Americans paid homage to these appurtenances of disaster with a sidelong glance, if at all. But John Stilgoe has been thinking about lifeboats ever since he listened with his father as the kitchen radio... More


Daybooks of Discovery

Nature Diaries in Britain, 1770–1870


Mary Ellen Bellanca

Rooted in a thriving culture of amateur natural history, the keeping of nature journals and diaries flourished in late-eighteenth-and early-nineteenth-century Britain. As prescientific worldviews ceded to a more materialist outlook informed by an explosion of factual knowledge, lovers of nature... More


The Fruits and Fruit Trees of Monticello



Peter J. Hatch

Lavishly illustrated, Peter Hatch's The Fruits and Fruit Trees of Monticello is not only a detailed history of Jefferson's gardens and their re-creation but a virtual encyclopedia of early American pomology.


Pages