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Environmental Studies


A Useful Dog



Donald McCaig

Alternately comical, melancholic, pragmatic, and poetic, Donald McCaig’s collection AUseful Dog offers a delightful exploration of the simple yet rich relationship between dogs and humans. Having cast aside urban life in the 1970s in favor of working and living on a sheep farm in Virginia, McCaig... More


Millipedes and Moon Tigers

Science and Policy in an Age of Extinction


Steve Nash

Millipedes and Moon Tigers explores those uneasy places where scientific research meets public policy-making--and the resulting human effect on our natural and historical landscapes. Steve Nash’s eye gravitates toward those specific, contemporary stories whose relevance does not diminish with a... More


Gilbert White

A Biography of the Author of The Natural History of Selborne


Richard Mabey

With more than two hundred editions, Gilbert White’s The Natural History of Selborne is one of the most published books in the English language. An environmental study of the eighteenth-century Hampshire parish where White was born and later served as curate, the book is distinguished by the author... More


Literature of Place

Dwelling on the Land before Earth Day, 1970


Melanie Simo

In a world that is increasingly reliant on science, technology, and virtual relationships, our reciprocal and intimate connection to place has often been overlooked. This concern is now at the forefront of debate among environmental planners and designers, who are asking: What is distinctive and... More


The American Wilderness

Reflections on Nature Protection in the United States


Thomas R. Vale

Interpretations of wild nature and wilderness are particularly diverse in the American mind, given our history, our collective economic success, and our diverse social and cultural mix. Although the meanings we attribute to nature reflect our different views of the role humans should play in the... More


Design with Culture

Claiming America's Landscape Heritage


Charles A. Birnbaum and Mary V. Hughes, eds.

Often viewed as nostalgic and inauthentic, the work of early preservationists has frequently been underrated by modern practitioners. Rather than considering early preservation within its historical context, many modern preservationists judge their predecessors’ work by contemporary standards,... More


An American Cutting Garden

A Primer for Growing Cut Flowers Where Summers Are Hot and Winters Are Cold


Suzanne McIntire

In An American Cutting Garden Suzanne McIntire describes how to plan a cutting garden, choose suitable plants, keep the garden in good order, and harvest a bountiful crop—all with charm and humor. Using both common and botanical names, she discusses in depth a wide variety of herbaceous perennials... More


Topographies of the Sacred

The Poetics of Place in European Romanticism


Kate Rigby

Although the British romantic poets—notably, Blake, Wordsworth, and Byron—have been the subjects of previous ecocritical examinations, Kate Rigby’s Topographies of the Sacred is the first book to compare English and German literary models of romanticism. Rigby treats not only canonical British... More


Topographies of the Sacred

The Poetics of Place in European Romanticism


Kate Rigby

Although the British romantic poets—notably, Blake, Wordsworth, and Byron—have been the subjects of previous ecocritical examinations, Kate Rigby’s Topographies of the Sacred is the first book to compare English and German literary models of romanticism. Rigby treats not only canonical British... More


Eco-Man

New Perspectives on Masculinity and Nature


Mark Allister, ed.

The paradoxical role nature plays in American myth and history grows in part from the male’s reverent fascination with the wilderness and his equally strong impulse to dominate it. Many canonical literary works—think of Thoreau, Melville, Hemingway, Faulkner—look to the wild as the site for... More


Mary Austin's Regionalism

Reflections on Gender, Genre, and Geography


Heike Schaefer

Best known for The Land of Little Rain, a collection of natural-history essays about the California deserts, the Western writer Mary Austin (1868–1934) was a prolific literary figure in the first few decades of the twentieth century. In addition to her essays and short stories, Austin produced... More


Cumberland Island National Seashore

A History of Conservation Conflict


Lary M. Dilsaver

Located off the coast of Georgia, Cumberland Island was once the retreat of some of America’s wealthiest families, most notably the family of Thomas Carnegie, brother of steel magnate Andrew Carnegie, and his wife Lucy. The death in 1962 of their last child, Florence Carnegie Perkins, ended the... More


Skinny Dipping

And Other Immersions in Water, Myth, and Being Human


Janet Lembke

The author of the acclaimed Dangerous Birds followed that success with a new collection of essays on the natural world, these connected by the theme of water: exploring issues as varied as the joy that water brings, the wistful rememberings it engenders, and its sacredness. As with all of Lembke’s... More


Lines on the Land

Writers, Art, and the National Parks


Scott Herring

The nineteenth-century photographer William Henry Jackson once complained of the skepticism with which early descriptions of Yellowstone were met: the place was too wondrous to be believed. The public demanded proof, and a host of artists and writers obliged. These early explorers possessed a... More


The Changing Scale of American Agriculture



John Fraser Hart

Few Americans know much about contemporary farming, which has evolved dramatically over the past few decades. In The Changing Scale of American Agriculture, the award-winning geographer and landscape historian John Fraser Hart describes the transformation of farming from the mid-twentieth century,... More


Practical Ecocriticism

Literature, Biology, and the Environment


Glen A. Love

Practical Ecocriticismis the first book to ground environmental literature firmly in the life sciences, particularly evolutionary biology, and to attempt to bridge the ever-widening gulf between the "Two Cultures." Glen Love—himself one of the founders of ecocriticism—argues that literary studies... More


The History of Ornithology in Virginia



David W. Johnston

Host to a large and diverse bird population as well as a long human history, Virginia is arguably the birthplace of ornithology in North America. David W. Johnston’s History of Ornithology in Virginia,the result of over a decade of research, is the first book to address this fascinating element of... More


Shorewords

A Collection of American Women's Coastal Writings


Susan A. C. Rosen

Emily Dickinson, Lucille Clifton, Rachel Carson, and Gretel Ehrlich: They hail from different regions, employ widely divergent writing styles, and are not known primarily as nature writers. Yet in Shorewords, Susan A. C. Rosen has compiled an imaginative and beautifully balanced anthology of... More


New Orleans

The Making of an Urban Landscape


Peirce F. Lewis

In his now classic work of historical geography, published in 1976, Lewis traces the rise and expansion of New Orleans through four major historic periods. This second edition offers a revised and greatly expanded look at this unique community on the Mississippi Delta--"a fearsome place, difficult... More


Peak Experiences

Walking Meditations on Literature, Nature, and Need


Ian Marshall

Nature’s ability to satisfy deep human needs is familiar to anyone who has hiked up a mountain, canoed a river, or hung a bird feeder outside the kitchen window. In Story Line, his groundbreaking work of narrative ecocriticism, Ian Marshall explores how natural surroundings inspired works of... More


Visions of the Land

Science, Literature, and the American Environment from the Era of Exploration to the Age of Ecology


Michael A. Bryson

The work of John Charles Fremont, Richard Byrd, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, John Wesley Powell, Susan Cooper, Rachel Carson, and Loren Eiseley represents a widely divergent body of writing. Yet despite their range of genres—including exploration narratives, technical reports, natural histories,... More


The Pleasure Gardens of Virginia

From Jamestown to Jefferson


Peter Martin

Using a rich assortment of illustrations and biographical sketches, Peter Martin relates the experiences of colonial gardeners who shaped the natural beauty of Virginia's wilderness into varied displays of elegance. He shows that ornamental gardening was a scientific, aesthetic, and cultural... More


Refiguring the Map of Sorrow

Nature Writing and Autobiography


Mark Allister

Recent decades have witnessed an explosion of interest in both autobiography and environmental literature. In Refiguring the Map of Sorrow, Mark Allister brings these two genres together by examining a distinct form of grief narrative, in which the writers deal with mourning by standing explicitly... More


Beyond Nature Writing

Expanding the Boundaries of Ecocriticism


Karla M. Armbruster and Kathleen R. Wallace, eds.

Ecocriticism, a field of study that has expanded dramatically over the past decade, has nevertheless remained—until recently—closely focused on critical analyses of nature writing and literature of wilderness. Karla Armbruster and Kathleen R. Wallace push well beyond that established framework with... More


His and Hers

Gender, Consumption, and Technology


Roger Horowitz and Arwen Mohun, eds.

The pathbreaking essays in this collection explore the history of consumption by synthesizing discrete historical literatures on consumer culture, gender, and the history of technology. Luxury hotels and the chocolate industry are among the diverse array of topics these authors use to demonstrate... More


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