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History and Political Science


Spanish New Orleans and the Caribbean / La Nueva Orleans y la Caribe españoles
Alfred E. Lemmon

New Orleans thrived under Spanish rule (1762–1803), linked through trade and empire to the nerve centers of the circum-Caribbean. This book explores the far-reaching ways in which the Spanish influence is evident in the city to this day, in architecture, agriculture, science, and the arts. The... More


Of Courtiers and Princes
Stories of Lower Court Clerks and Their Judges Edited by Todd C. Peppers

Praise for In Chambers: "This new collection of essays, including some by former clerks, takes readers inside justices’ chambers for a look at clerkship life.... [T]he best parts of the book are the behind-the-scenes descriptions of life at the court."— Associated Press"An excellent book... It’s... More


Rival Visions
How Jefferson and His Contemporaries Defined the Early American Republic Edited by Dustin Gish and Andrew Bibby.

The emergence of the early American republic as a new nation on the world stage conjured rival visions in the eyes of leading statesmen at home and attentive observers abroad. Thomas Jefferson envisioned the newly independent states as a federation of republics united by common experience, mutual... More


The Papers of George Washington
Revolutionary War Series, vol. 2828 August–27 October 1780 George Washington

In late August 1780, Gen. George Washington was buoyed by expectations that French reinforcements would participate in an attack on New York City and that a southern army was poised to advance through South Carolina and possibly regain Charleston. News soon reached him that a key division was... More


Revolutionary Prophecies
The Founders and America’s Future Edited by Robert M. S. McDonald and Peter S. Onuf

The America of the early republic was built on an experiment, a hopeful prophecy that would only be fulfilled if an enlightened people could find its way through its past and into a future. Americans recognized that its promises would only be fully redeemed at a future date. In Revolutionary... More


A German Barber-Surgeon in the Atlantic Slave Trade
The Seventeenth-Century Journal of Johann Peter Oettinger Johann Peter Oettinger. Edited and translated by Craig Koslofsky and Roberto Zaugg

As he traveled across Germany and the Netherlands and sailed on Dutch and Brandenburg slave ships to the Caribbean and Africa from 1682 to 1696, the young German barber-surgeon Johann Peter Oettinger (1666–1746) recorded his experiences in a detailed journal, discovered by Roberto Zaugg and Craig... More


Against Popery
Britain, Empire, and Anti-Catholicism Edited by Evan Haefeli

Although commonly regarded as a prejudice against Roman Catholics and their religion, anti-popery is both more complex and far more historically significant than this common conception would suggest. As the essays collected in this volume demonstrate, anti-popery is a powerful lens through which to... More


Backlash
Libel, Impeachment, and Populism in the Reign of Queen Anne Rachel Carnell

A country bitterly divided between two political parties. Populist mobs rising in support of a reactionary rabble-rouser. Foreign interference in the political process. Strained relations between Britain and Europe. These are not recent headlines—they are from the year 1710, when Queen Anne ruled... More


Fashioning the New England Family
Kimberly S. Alexander

As America’s first historical society, the Massachusetts Historical Society has collected family materials since 1791, including long-cherished pieces of clothing that were acquired alongside papers such as letters and diaries. Because of the different storage requirements for textiles and... More


The Papers of Robert Treat Paine, 1787-1814
Robert Treat Paine. Edited by Edward W. Hanson

The fifth and final volume of this series encompasses Robert Treat Paine’s time as a justice on the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts and covers the final years of his life. Best known as a signer of the Declaration of Independence, Paine spent the remainder of his public career in state... More


The Selected Papers of John Jay
1794–1798 John Jay. Edited by Elizabeth M. Nuxoll

Volume 6 opens with John Jay aboard the Ohio, bound for London in May 1794, to begin what will prove to be the most controversial mission of his career: the negotiation of the treaty that now bears his name. The volume documents the series of proposals and drafts that culminated in the treaty, as... More


The Case for Identity Politics
Polarization, Demographic Change, and Racial Appeals Christopher T. Stout

Following the defeat of Hillary Clinton in the presidential election of 2016, many prominent scholars and political pundits argued that a successful Democratic Party in the future must abandon identity politics. While these calls for Democrats to distance themselves from such strategies have... More


First and Always
A New Portrait of George Washington Peter R. Henriques

George Washington may be the most famous American who ever lived, and certainly is one of the most admired. While surrounded by myths, it is no myth that the man who led Americans’ fight for independence and whose two terms in office largely defined the presidency was the most highly respected... More


Armed Citizens
The Road from Ancient Rome to the Second Amendment Noah Shusterman

Although much has changed in the United States since the eighteenth century, our framework for gun laws still largely relies on the Second Amendment and the patterns that emerged in the colonial era. America has long been a heavily armed, and racially divided, society, yet few citizens understand... More


Belzoni
The Giant Archaeologists Love to Hate Ivor Noël Hume

The Italian son of a barber. A failed hydraulic engineer. A giant who performed feats of strength and agility in the circus. Giovanni Belzoni (1778–1824) was all of these before going on to become one of the most controversial figures in the history of Egyptian archaeology. A man of exceptional... More


Colonial Williamsburg: The Story
From the Colonial Era to the Restoration Edward G. Lengel

It was in Williamsburg, Virginia, that American independence—and democracy—took root. And it is in the Historic Area of Colonial Williamsburg that millions have learned about the continuing relevance of America’s founding ideas. Spanning nearly five centuries, Williamsburg: The Story chronicles the... More


Yuletide in Dixie
Slavery, Christmas, and Southern Memory Robert E. May

How did enslaved African Americans in the Old South really experience Christmas? Did Christmastime provide slaves with a lengthy and jubilant respite from labor and the whip, as is generally assumed, or is the story far more complex and troubling? In this provocative, revisionist, and sometimes... More


Conceived in Crisis
The Revolutionary Creation of an American State Christopher R. Pearl

Conceived in Crisis argues that the American Revolution was not just the product of the Imperial Crisis, brought on by Parliament’s attempt to impose a new idea of empire on the American colonies. To an equal or greater degree, it was a response to the inability of individual colonial governments... More


Colossal Ambitions
Confederate Planning for a Post–Civil War World Adrian Brettle

Leading politicians, diplomats, clerics, planters, farmers, manufacturers, and merchants preached a transformative, world-historical role for the Confederacy, persuading many of their compatriots to fight not merely to retain what they had but to gain their future empire. Impervious to reality,... More


Newest Born of Nations
European Nationalist Movements and the Making of the Confederacy Ann L. Tucker

From the earliest stirrings of southern nationalism to the defeat of the Confederacy, analysis of European nationalist movements played a critical role in how southerners thought about their new southern nation. Southerners argued that because the Confederate nation was cast in the same mold as its... More


The Papers of George Washington
22 September 1796-3 March 1797 George Washington. Edited by Adrina Garbooshian-Huggins

The concluding volume of the Presidential Series begins following the publication of Washington’s Farewell Address, which was circulated widely in newspapers and drew reactions from citizens across the nation. With his approaching retirement from the presidency, Washington tended to a number of... More


The Papers of James Madison
1 May 1816-3 March 1817, with a supplement, 1809-1815 James Madison. Edited by J. C. A. Stagg, Mary Parke Johnson, Katharine E. Harbury, and Anne Mandeville Colony

The final volume of the Presidential Series covers Madison’s last ten months in office, during which he maintained a busy schedule despite taking the longest summer vacation in all his time in Washington. Foreign policy was dominated by crises with Spain and Algiers. Negotiations with Great Britain... More


Suicide
The Social Causes of Self-Destruction Jason Manning

The conventional approach to suicide is psychiatric: ask the average person why people kill themselves, and they will likely cite depression. But this approach fails to recognize suicide’s social causes. People kill themselves because of breakups and divorces, because of lost jobs and ruined... More


The Complete Writings and Selected Correspondence of John Dickinson
John Dickinson. Edited by Jane E. Calvert

The Complete Writings and Selected Correspondence of John Dickinson, vol. 1 inaugurates a multivolume documentary edition that will, for the first time ever, provide the complete collection of everything Dickinson published on public affairs over the course of his life. The documents include... More


The Devil's Art
Divination and Discipline in Early Modern Germany Jason Philip Coy

In early modern Germany, soothsayers known as wise women and men roamed the countryside. Fixtures of village life, they identified thieves and witches, read palms, and cast horoscopes. German villagers regularly consulted these fortune-tellers and practiced divination in their everyday lives. Jason... More


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