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History and Political Science


Fashioning the New England Family



Kimberly S. Alexander

As America’s first historical society, the Massachusetts Historical Society has collected family materials since 1791, including long-cherished pieces of clothing that were acquired alongside papers such as letters and diaries. Because of the different storage requirements for textiles and... More


The Papers of Robert Treat Paine, 1787-1814



Robert Treat Paine. Edited by Edward W. Hanson

The fifth and final volume of this series encompasses Robert Treat Paine’s time as a justice on the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts and covers the final years of his life. Best known as a signer of the Declaration of Independence, Paine spent the remainder of his public career in state... More


Slavery and War in the Americas

Race, Citizenship, and State Building in the United States and Brazil, 1861-1870


Vitor Izecksohn

In this pathbreaking new work, Vitor Izecksohn attempts to shed new light on the American Civil War by comparing it to a strikingly similar campaign in South America--the War of the Triple Alliance of 1864–70, which galvanized four countries and became the longest large-scale international conflict... More


The Papers of George Washington
Revolutionary War Series, vol. 27
5 July-27 August 1780


George Washington and Benjamin L. Huggins

Three major themes dominate George Washington’s correspondence in volume 27 of the Revolutionary War Series: the arrival of a French expeditionary army and navy, the urgent need to prepare the Continental army for a joint Franco-American offensive to take New York City, and the cultivation of... More


The Correspondence of Thomas Hutchinson

1767-1769


Thomas Hutchinson, John W. Tyler, and Elizabeth Dubrulle

The second volume of Thomas Hutchinson’s correspondence covers the years 1767 through 1769. In 1767, Charles Townshend's new taxes, in addition to his ambitious plans to improve customs enforcement and render crown officials in the colonies more independent of local assemblies, caused increasing... More


The Records of Kings Chapel, Boston



Edited by James B. Bell and James E. Mooney

[Book description not available]


The Records of Kings Chapel, Boston



Edited by James B. Bell and James E. Mooney

The story of the origins of the first Anglican congregation established in Boston and New England, Kings Chapel, is significantly shaped by the gradually emerging imperial policies of the government of Charles II during the late seventeenth century. It is a transatlantic account influenced largely... More


Republican Populist

Spiro Agnew and the Origins of Donald Trump’s America


Charles J. Holden, Zach Messitte, and Jerald Podair

Typically a maligned figure in American political history, former vice president Spiro T. Agnew is often overlooked. Although he is largely remembered for his alliterative speeches, attacks on the media and East Coast intellectuals, and his resignation from office in 1973 in the wake of tax evasion... More


Yuletide in Dixie

Slavery, Christmas, and Southern Memory


Robert E. May

How did enslaved African Americans in the Old South really experience Christmas? Did Christmastime provide slaves with a lengthy and jubilant respite from labor and the whip, as is generally assumed, or is the story far more complex and troubling? In this provocative, revisionist, and sometimes... More


Gerrymanders

How Redistricting Has Protected Slavery, White Supremacy, and Partisan Minorities in Virginia


Brent Tarter

Many are aware that gerrymandering exists and suspect it plays a role in our elections, but its history goes far deeper, and its impacts are far greater, than most realize. In his latest book, Brent Tarter focuses on Virginia’s long history of gerrymandering to uncover its immense influence on the... More


Jeffersonians in Power

The Rhetoric of Opposition Meets the Realities of Governing


Edited by Joanne B. Freeman and Johann N. Neem

In the 1790s, the Jeffersonian Republicans were the party of "no." They opposed attempts to expand the government’s role in society, criticized the Washington administration’s national bank, railed against a standing army, and bemoaned the spirit of the Federalist regime, which, they claimed,... More


Reclaiming Patriotism



Amitai Etzioni

Amitai Etzioni has made his reputation by transcending unwieldy, and even dangerous, binaries such as left/right or globalism/nativism. In his new book, Etzioni calls for nothing less than a social transformation—led by a new social movement—to save our world’s democracies, currently under threat... More


The Founding of Thomas Jefferson's University



Edited by John A. Ragosta, Peter S. Onuf, and Andrew J. O’Shaughnessy

Established in 1819 by Thomas Jefferson, the University of Virginia was known as "The University" throughout the South for most of the nineteenth century, and today it stands as one of the premier universities in the world. This volume provides an in-depth look at the founding of the University and... More


Thomas Jefferson's Lives

Biographers and the Battle for History


Edited by Robert M. S. McDonald

Who was the "real" Thomas Jefferson? If this question has an answer, it will probably not be revealed reading the many accounts of his life. For two centuries biographers have provided divergent perspectives on him as a man and conflicting appraisals of his accomplishments. Jefferson was... More


Nelly Custis Lewis's Housekeeping Book



Edited by Patricia Brady Schmit

[Book description not available]


Establishing Religious Freedom

Jefferson's Statute in Virginia


Thomas E. Buckley

The significance of the Virginia Statute for Establishing Religious Freedom goes far beyond the borders of the Old Dominion. Its influence ultimately extended to the Supreme Court’s interpretation of the separation of church and state. In his latest book, Thomas Buckley tells the story of the... More


Educated in Tyranny

Slavery at Thomas Jefferson’s University


Edited by Maurie D. McInnis and Louis P. Nelson

From the University of Virginia’s very inception, slavery was deeply woven into its fabric. Enslaved people first helped to construct and then later lived in the Academical Village; they raised and prepared food, washed clothes, cleaned privies, and chopped wood. They maintained the buildings,... More


Summer of Hate

Charlottesville, USA


Hawes Spencer

In August 2017, violence erupted in Charlottesville, Virginia, during two days of demonstrations by white supremacists, neo-Nazis, and counterprotesters, including members of antifa and Black Lives Matter. Ostensibly motivated by the city’s plans to remove Confederate statues from two public parks... More


The Insurgent Delegate

Selected Letters and Other Writings of George Thatcher


Edited by William C. diGiacomantonio

George Thatcher served as a U.S. representative from Maine throughout the Federalist Era (1789-1801)—the most critical and formative period of American constitutional history. A moderate on most political issues, the Cape Cod native and Harvard-educated lawyer proved a maverick in matters relating... More


A Strife of Tongues

The Compromise of 1850 and the Ideological Foundations of the American Civil War


Stephen E. Maizlish

Near the end of a nine-month confrontation preceding the Compromise of 1850, Abraham Venable warned his fellow congressmen that "words become things." Indeed, in politics—then, as now—rhetoric makes reality. But while the legislative maneuvering, factional alignments, and specific measures of the... More


"The Only Unavoidable Subject of Regret"

George Washington, Slavery, and the Enslaved Community at Mount Vernon


Mary V. Thompson

George Washington’s life has been scrutinized by historians over the past three centuries, but the day-to-day lives of Mount Vernon’s enslaved workers, who left few written records but made up 90 percent of the estate’s population, have been largely left out of the story.In "The Only Unavoidable... More


A Little Child Shall Lead Them

A Documentary Account of the Struggle for School Desegregation in Prince Edward County, Virginia


Edited by Brian J. Daugherity and Brian Grogan

In the twentieth-century struggle for racial equality, there was perhaps no setting more fraught and contentious than the public schools of the American south. In Prince Edward County, Virginia, in 1951, a student strike for better school facilities became part of the NAACP legal campaign for... More


Women in the American Revolution

Gender, Politics, and the Domestic World


Edited by Barbara B. Oberg

Building on a quarter century of scholarship following the publication of the groundbreaking Women in the Age of the American Revolution, the engagingly written essays in this volume offer an updated answer to the question, What was life like for women in the era of the American Revolution? The... More


The Papers of James Madison
Presidential Series, vol. 10
13 October 1815-30 April 1816


James Madison. Edited by J. C. A. Stagg, Mary Parke Johnson, Katharine E. Harbury, and Anne Mandeville Colony

[Book description not available]


Eliza Fenwick

Early Modern Feminist


Lissa Paul

This captivating biography traces the life of Eliza Fenwick, an extraordinary woman who paved her own unique path throughout the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries as she made her way from country to country as writer, teacher, and school owner.Lissa Paul brings to light Fenwick’s letters for... More


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