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History and Political Science


Colossal Ambitions

Confederate Planning for a Post–Civil War World


Adrian Brettle

Leading politicians, diplomats, clerics, planters, farmers, manufacturers, and merchants preached a transformative, world-historical role for the Confederacy, persuading many of their compatriots to fight not merely to retain what they had but to gain their future empire. Impervious to reality,... More


The Devil's Art

Divination and Discipline in Early Modern Germany


Jason Philip Coy

In early modern Germany, soothsayers known as wise women and men roamed the countryside. Fixtures of village life, they identified thieves and witches, read palms, and cast horoscopes. German villagers regularly consulted these fortune-tellers and practiced divination in their everyday lives. Jason... More


Suicide

The Social Causes of Self-Destruction


Jason Manning

[Book description not available]


The Papers of James Madison
Presidential Series, vol. 11
1 May 1816-3 March 1817, with a supplement, 1809-1815


James Madison. Edited by J. C. A. Stagg, Mary Parke Johnson, Katharine E. Harbury, and Anne Mandeville Colony

The final volume of the Presidential Series covers Madison’s last ten months in office, during which he maintained a busy schedule despite taking the longest summer vacation in all his time in Washington. Foreign policy was dominated by crises with Spain and Algiers. Negotiations with Great Britain... More


Newest Born of Nations

European Nationalist Movements and the Making of the Confederacy


Ann L. Tucker

From the earliest stirrings of southern nationalism to the defeat of the Confederacy, analysis of European nationalist movements played a critical role in how southerners thought about their new southern nation. Southerners argued that because the Confederate nation was cast in the same mold as its... More


The Worst Passions of Human Nature

White Supremacy in the Civil War North


Paul D. Escott

The American North’s commitment to preventing a southern secession rooted in slaveholding suggests a society united in its opposition to slavery and racial inequality. The reality, however, was far more complex and troubling. In his latest book, Paul Escott lays bare the contrast between progress... More


Fashioning the New England Family



Kimberly S. Alexander

As America’s first historical society, the Massachusetts Historical Society has collected family materials since 1791, including long-cherished pieces of clothing that were acquired alongside papers such as letters and diaries. Because of the different storage requirements for textiles and... More


The Papers of Robert Treat Paine, 1787-1814



Robert Treat Paine. Edited by Edward W. Hanson

The fifth and final volume of this series encompasses Robert Treat Paine’s time as a justice on the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts and covers the final years of his life. Best known as a signer of the Declaration of Independence, Paine spent the remainder of his public career in state... More


Lighting the Way

Federal Courts, Civil Rights, and Public Policy


Douglas Rice

Do our federal courts, including the Supreme Court, lead or merely implement public policy? This is a critical question in the study and practice of law, with a long history of continued dispute and contradictory evidence. In Lighting the Way, Douglas Rice systematically examines both sides of this... More


After Virginia Tech

Guns, Safety, and Healing in the Era of Mass Shootings


Thomas P. Kapsidelis

In what has become the era of the mass shooting, we are routinely taken to scenes of terrible violence. Often neglected, however, is the long aftermath, including the efforts to effect change in the wake of such tragedies. On April 16, 2007, thirty-two Virginia Tech students and professors were... More


The False Cause

Fraud, Fabrication, and White Supremacy in Confederate Memory


Adam H. Domby

The Lost Cause ideology that emerged after the Civil War and flourished in the early twentieth century in essence sought to recast a struggle to perpetuate slavery as a heroic defense of the South. As Adam Domby reveals here, this was not only an insidious goal; it was founded on falsehoods. The... More


Redemption from Tyranny

Herman Husband's American Revolution


Bruce E. Stewart

[Book description not available]


The Silent Prologue

How Judicial Philosophies Shape Our Constitutional Rights


Ofer Raban

The U. S. Federal Constitution contains a series of rights and liberties operating as restrictions on the powers of government, and courts have the final authority to determine what these often nebulous restrictions require. But judges are deeply divided over the correct methodology to follow in... More


Slavery and War in the Americas

Race, Citizenship, and State Building in the United States and Brazil, 1861-1870


Vitor Izecksohn

In this pathbreaking new work, Vitor Izecksohn attempts to shed new light on the American Civil War by comparing it to a strikingly similar campaign in South America--the War of the Triple Alliance of 1864–70, which galvanized four countries and became the longest large-scale international conflict... More


The Papers of George Washington
Revolutionary War Series, vol. 27
5 July-27 August 1780


George Washington and Benjamin L. Huggins

Three major themes dominate George Washington’s correspondence in volume 27 of the Revolutionary War Series: the arrival of a French expeditionary army and navy, the urgent need to prepare the Continental army for a joint Franco-American offensive to take New York City, and the cultivation of... More


The Correspondence of Thomas Hutchinson

1767-1769


Thomas Hutchinson, John W. Tyler, and Elizabeth Dubrulle

The second volume of Thomas Hutchinson’s correspondence covers the years 1767 through 1769. In 1767, Charles Townshend's new taxes, in addition to his ambitious plans to improve customs enforcement and render crown officials in the colonies more independent of local assemblies, caused increasing... More


The Papers of George Washington
Presidential Series, vol. 20
1 April-21 September 1796


George Washington. Edited by David R. Hoth and William M. Ferraro

Throughout volume 20 of the Presidential Series, George Washington looked forward to retirement from public life, preparing a farewell address to announce his intention and leave behind guiding principles for the nation. Relations with Great Britain and France dominated foreign policy, as the House... More


The Records of Kings Chapel, Boston



Edited by James B. Bell and James E. Mooney

The story of the origins of the first Anglican congregation established in Boston and New England, Kings Chapel, is significantly shaped by the gradually emerging imperial policies of the government of Charles II during the late seventeenth century. It is a transatlantic account influenced largely... More


The Records of Kings Chapel, Boston



Edited by James B. Bell and James E. Mooney

[Book description not available]


Republican Populist

Spiro Agnew and the Origins of Donald Trump’s America


Charles J. Holden, Zach Messitte, and Jerald Podair

Typically a maligned figure in American political history, former vice president Spiro T. Agnew is often overlooked. Although he is largely remembered for his alliterative speeches, attacks on the media and East Coast intellectuals, and his resignation from office in 1973 in the wake of tax evasion... More


Yuletide in Dixie

Slavery, Christmas, and Southern Memory


Robert E. May

How did enslaved African Americans in the Old South really experience Christmas? Did Christmastime provide slaves with a lengthy and jubilant respite from labor and the whip, as is generally assumed, or is the story far more complex and troubling? In this provocative, revisionist, and sometimes... More


Gerrymanders

How Redistricting Has Protected Slavery, White Supremacy, and Partisan Minorities in Virginia


Brent Tarter

Many are aware that gerrymandering exists and suspect it plays a role in our elections, but its history goes far deeper, and its impacts are far greater, than most realize. In his latest book, Brent Tarter focuses on Virginia’s long history of gerrymandering to uncover its immense influence on the... More


Jeffersonians in Power

The Rhetoric of Opposition Meets the Realities of Governing


Edited by Joanne B. Freeman and Johann N. Neem

In the 1790s, the Jeffersonian Republicans were the party of "no." They opposed attempts to expand the government’s role in society, criticized the Washington administration’s national bank, railed against a standing army, and bemoaned the spirit of the Federalist regime, which, they claimed,... More


Reclaiming Patriotism



Amitai Etzioni

Amitai Etzioni has made his reputation by transcending unwieldy, and even dangerous, binaries such as left/right or globalism/nativism. In his new book, Etzioni calls for nothing less than a social transformation—led by a new social movement—to save our world’s democracies, currently under threat... More


The Founding of Thomas Jefferson's University



Edited by John A. Ragosta, Peter S. Onuf, and Andrew J. O’Shaughnessy

Established in 1819 by Thomas Jefferson, the University of Virginia was known as "The University" throughout the South for most of the nineteenth century, and today it stands as one of the premier universities in the world. This volume provides an in-depth look at the founding of the University and... More


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