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History and Political Science


My Work among the Freedmen
The Civil War and Reconstruction Letters of Harriet M. Buss Harriet M. Buss. Edited by Jonathan W. White and Lydia J. Davis

Between 1863 and 1871, Harriet M. Buss of Sterling, Massachusetts, taught former slaves in three different regions of the South, in coastal South Carolina, Norfolk, Virginia, and Raleigh, North Carolina. A white, educated Baptist woman, she initially saw herself as on a mission to the freedpeople... More


Music and Urban Life in Baroque Germany
Tanya Kevorkian

Music and Urban Life in Baroque Germany offers a new narrative of Baroque music, accessible to non–music specialists, in which Tanya Kevorkian defines the era in terms of social dynamics rather than style and genre development. Towns were crucial sites of music-making. Kevorkian explores how... More


Lame Captains and Left-Handed Admirals
Amputee Officers in Nelson's Navy Teresa Michals

Throughout the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, the Royal Navy had a peculiar problem: it had too many talented and ambitious officers, all competing for a limited number of command positions. Given this surplus, we might expect that a major physical impairment would automatically disqualify an... More


Averting Doomsday
Arms Control during the Nixon Presidency Patrick J. Garrity and Erin R. Mahan

In the controversial legacy of the Nixon presidency, the administration’s effort to curb and control the spread of the world’s weapons of mass destruction is often overlooked. And yet by the time President Nixon left office under the cloud of the Watergate scandal, his actions on this front had... More


Strange Brethren
Refugees, Religious Bonds, and Reformation in Frankfurt, 1554–1608 Maximilian Miguel Scholz

In the sixteenth century, German cities and territories welcomed thousands of refugees fleeing the religious persecution sparked by the Reformation. As Strange Brethren reveals, these Reformation refugees had a profound impact on the societies they entered. Exploring one major destination for... More


The Cacophony of Politics
Northern Democrats and the American Civil War J. Matthew Gallman

The Cacophony of Politics charts the trajectory of the Democratic Party as the party of opposition in the North during the Civil War. A comprehensive overview, this book reveals the myriad complications and contingencies of political life in the Northern states and explains the objectives of the... More


Fashioning the New England Family
Kimberly S. Alexander

As America’s first historical society, the Massachusetts Historical Society has collected family materials since 1791, including long-cherished pieces of clothing that were acquired alongside papers such as letters and diaries. Because of the different storage requirements for textiles and... More


The Papers of Robert Treat Paine, 1787-1814
Robert Treat Paine. Edited by Edward W. Hanson

The fifth and final volume of this series encompasses Robert Treat Paine’s time as a justice on the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts and covers the final years of his life. Best known as a signer of the Declaration of Independence, Paine spent the remainder of his public career in state... More


The Senate
From White Supremacy to Governmental Gridlock Daniel Wirls

In this lively analysis, Daniel Wirls examines the Senate in relation to our other institutions of government and the constitutional system as a whole, exposing the role of the "world’s greatest deliberative body" in maintaining white supremacy in America and undermining effective government.As... More


George Washington's Hair
How Early Americans Remembered the Founders Keith Beutler

Mostly hidden from public view, like an embarrassing family secret, scores of putative locks of George Washington’s hair are held, more than two centuries after his death, in the collections of America’s historical societies, public and academic archives, and museums. In surveying these bodily... More


The Selected Papers of John Jay
1799–1829 John Jay. Edited by Elizabeth M. Nuxoll

Volume 7 of The Selected Papers of John Jay opens in 1799 with John Jay well into his second term as governor of New York. After overseeing the passage of the law for gradually abolishing slavery in March 1799, Jay’s administration faltered in its final months due to an ascendant Republican Party... More


Spanish New Orleans and the Caribbean / La Nueva Orleans y la Caribe españoles
Alfred E. Lemmon

New Orleans thrived under Spanish rule (1762–1803), linked through trade and empire to the nerve centers of the circum-Caribbean. This book explores the far-reaching ways in which the Spanish influence is evident in the city to this day, in architecture, agriculture, science, and the arts. The... More


Fighting Political Gridlock
How States Shape Our Nation and Our Lives David J. Toscano. Foreword by Senator Mark R. Warner

In this profoundly polarized era, the nation has been transfixed on the politics of Washington and its seemingly impenetrable gridlock. Many of the decisions that truly affect people’s lives, however, are being made not on the federal level but in the states. Faced with Washington’s political... More


High Courts in Global Perspective
Evidence, Methodologies, and Findings Edited by Nuno Garoupa, Rebecca D. Gill, and Lydia B. Tiede

High courts around the world hold a revered place in the legal hierarchy. These courts are the presumed impartial final arbiters as individuals, institutions, and nations resolve their legal differences. But they also buttress and mitigate the influence of other political actors, protect minority... More


Washington's Government
Charting the Origins of the Federal Administration Edited by Max M. Edling and Peter J. Kastor

Washington’s Government shows how George Washington’s administration—the subject of remarkably little previous study—was both more dynamic and more uncertain than previously thought. Rather than simply following a blueprint laid out by the Constitution, Washington and his advisors constructed over... More


Ireland and America
Empire, Revolution, and Sovereignty Edited by Patrick Griffin and Francis D. Cogliano

Looking at America through the Irish prism and employing a comparative approach, leading and emerging scholars of early American and Atlantic history interrogate anew the relationship between imperial reform and revolution in Ireland and America, offering fascinating insights into the imperial... More


The Papers of Francis Bernard
Governor of Colonial Massachusetts, 1760-1769 Francis Bernard. Edited by Colin Nicolson

The sixth and final volume of the Bernard Papers presents the official and private correspondence of Massachusetts royal governor Sir Francis Bernard upon his return to England in 1769 until his death in 1779, documenting his attempts to influence British colonial policy. Bernard’s letters on... More


The Elections of 2020
Edited by Michael Nelson

The Elections of 2020 is a timely, comprehensive, scholarly, and engagingly written account of the 2020 elections. It features essays by an all-star team of political scientists in the immediate aftermath of the 2020 general election, chronicling every stage of the presidential race as well as the... More


The Papers of James Madison
Secretary of State Series, vol. 121 June 1806-31 October 1806 James Madison. Edited by Angela Kreider, J. C. A. Stagg, Mary Parke Johnson, Anne Mandeville Colony, and Katharine E. Harbury

Volume 12 of the Secretary of State Series covers June through October 1806, during which Madison waited in vain for his diplomatic initiatives with Great Britain, Spain, and France to yield results, and received mounting evidence of Aaron Burr’s suspicious activities in the West. Tensions with... More


The Natural, Moral, and Political History of Jamaica, and the Territories thereon Depending
From the First Discovery of the Island by Christopher Columbus to the Year 1746 James Knight. Edited by Jack P. Greene

Between 1737 and 1746, James Knight—a merchant, planter, and sometime Crown official and legislator in Jamaica—wrote a massive two-volume history of the island. The first volume provided a narrative of the colony’s development up to the mid-1740s, while the second offered a broad survey of most... More


Making the World Over
Confronting Racism, Misogyny, and Xenophobia in U.S. History R. Marie Griffith

Political polarization and unrest are not exclusive to our era, but in the twenty-first century, we are living with seemingly unresolvable disagreements that threaten to tear our country apart. Discrimination, racism, tyranny, religious fundamentalism, political schisms, misogyny, "fake news,"... More


The Presidency
Facing Constitutional Crossroads

Following the election of Donald Trump, the office of the U.S. president has come under scrutiny like never before. Featuring penetrating insights from high-profile presidential scholars, The Presidency provides the deep historical and constitutional context needed to put the Trump era into its... More


The Correspondence of Thomas Hutchinson
January-October, 1770 Thomas Hutchinson. Edited by John W. Tyler and Margaret A. Hogan

The Boston Massacre occasioned a flurry of letter writing for Thomas Hutchinson, the royal governor of Massachusetts. So frequent was the correspondence to and from Hutchinson that this volume covers only the first ten months of 1770, beginning with the rising tide of violence in January and... More


Collateral Damage
Women Write about War Edited by Bárbara Mujica

From Homer to Tim O’Brien, war literature remains largely the domain of male writers, and traditional narratives imply that the burdens of war are carried by men. But women and children disproportionately suffer the consequences of conflict: famine, disease, sexual abuse, and emotional trauma... More


Statute Law in Colonial Virginia
Governors, Assemblymen, and the Revisals That Forged the Old Dominion Warren M. Billings

Between 1632 and 1748, Virginia’s General Assembly revised the colony’s statutes seven times. These revisals provide an invaluable opportunity to gauge how governors, councilors, and burgesses created a hybrid body of colonial statute law that would become the longest strand in the American legal... More


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