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History and Political Science


Ireland and America

Empire, Revolution, and Sovereignty Edited by Patrick Griffin and Francis D. Cogliano

Looking at America through the Irish prism and employing a comparative approach, leading and emerging scholars of early American and Atlantic history interrogate anew the relationship between imperial reform and revolution in Ireland and America, offering fascinating insights into the imperial... More


Washington's Government

Charting the Origins of the Federal Administration Edited by Max M. Edling and Peter J. Kastor

Washington’s Government shows how George Washington’s administration—the subject of remarkably little previous study—was both more dynamic and more uncertain than previously thought. Rather than simply following a blueprint laid out by the Constitution, Washington and his advisors constructed over... More


Masked Raiders

Irish Banditry in Southern Africa, 1880–1899 Charles van Onselen

Before the railway system linked South Africa’s major cities in the mid-1890s, the country was largely dependent on a horse-drawn economy. Diamonds from Griqualand West and gold from the Witwatersrand were transported by coach and horses to distant ports for export. For some Irish soldiers based at... More


The Papers of James Madison
Secretary of State Series, Volume 12
1 June 1806-31 October 1806 James Madison. Edited by Angela Kreider, J. C. A. Stagg, Mary Parke Johnson, Anne Mandeville Colony, and Katharine E. Harbury

Volume 12 of the Secretary of State Series covers June through October 1806, during which Madison waited in vain for his diplomatic initiatives with Great Britain, Spain, and France to yield results, and received mounting evidence of Aaron Burr’s suspicious activities in the West. Tensions with... More


The Elections of 2020

Edited by Michael Nelson

The Elections of 2020 is a timely, comprehensive, scholarly, and engagingly written account of the 2020 elections. It features essays by an all-star team of political scientists in the immediate aftermath of the 2020 general election, chronicling every stage of the presidential race as well as the... More


The Natural, Moral, and Political History of Jamaica, and the Territories thereon Depending

From the First Discovery of the Island by Christopher Columbus to the Year 1746 James Knight. Edited by Jack P. Greene

Between 1737 and 1746, James Knight—a merchant, planter, and sometime Crown official and legislator in Jamaica—wrote a massive two-volume history of the island. The first volume provided a narrative of the colony’s development up to the mid-1740s, while the second offered a broad survey of most... More


Making the World Over

Confronting Racism, Misogyny, and Xenophobia in U.S. History R. Marie Griffith

Political polarization and unrest are not exclusive to our era, but in the twenty-first century, we are living with seemingly unresolvable disagreements that threaten to tear our country apart. Discrimination, racism, tyranny, religious fundamentalism, political schisms, misogyny, "fake news,"... More


The Presidency

Facing Constitutional Crossroads Edited by Michael Nelson and Barbara A. Perry

Following the election of Donald Trump, the office of the U.S. president has come under scrutiny like never before. Featuring penetrating insights from high-profile presidential scholars, The Presidency provides the deep historical and constitutional context needed to put the Trump era into its... More


The Correspondence of Thomas Hutchinson

January-October, 1770 Thomas Hutchinson. Edited by John W. Tyler and Margaret A. Hogan

The Boston Massacre occasioned a flurry of letter writing for Thomas Hutchinson, the royal governor of Massachusetts. So frequent was the correspondence to and from Hutchinson that this volume covers only the first ten months of 1770, beginning with the rising tide of violence in January and... More


Collateral Damage

Women Write about War Edited by Bárbara Mujica

From Homer to Tim O’Brien, war literature remains largely the domain of male writers, and traditional narratives imply that the burdens of war are carried by men. But women and children disproportionately suffer the consequences of conflict: famine, disease, sexual abuse, and emotional trauma... More


Statute Law in Colonial Virginia

Governors, Assemblymen, and the Revisals That Forged the Old Dominion Warren M. Billings

Between 1632 and 1748, Virginia’s General Assembly revised the colony’s statutes seven times. These revisals provide an invaluable opportunity to gauge how governors, councilors, and burgesses created a hybrid body of colonial statute law that would become the longest strand in the American legal... More


Monacan Millennium

A Collaborative Archaeology and History of a Virginia Indian People Jeffrey L. Hantman

While Jamestown and colonial settlements dominate narratives of Virginia’s earliest days, the land’s oldest history belongs to its native people. Monacan Millennium tells the story of the Monacan Indian people of Virginia, stretching from 1000 A.D. through the moment of colonial contact in 1607 and... More


Racism in American Public Life

A Call to Action Johnnetta Betsch Cole

For some in our society, diversity is a threat. Others feel society should be more inclusive, if only out of fairness. But as Johnnetta Cole argues in her new book, embracing diversity and inclusiveness is more than a virtuous ideal; it is essential to a healthy, productive society. Focusing on... More


Revolutionary Prophecies

The Founders and America’s Future Edited by Robert M. S. McDonald and Peter S. Onuf. Afterword by Joanne B. Freeman

The America of the early republic was built on an experiment, a hopeful prophecy that would only be fulfilled if an enlightened people could find its way through its past and into a future. Americans recognized that its promises would only be fully redeemed at a future date. In Revolutionary... More


Rival Visions

How Jefferson and His Contemporaries Defined the Early American Republic Edited by Dustin Gish and Andrew Bibby

The emergence of the early American republic as a new nation on the world stage conjured rival visions in the eyes of leading statesmen at home and attentive observers abroad. Thomas Jefferson envisioned the newly independent states as a federation of republics united by common experience, mutual... More


The Papers of George Washington
Revolutionary War Series, Volume 28
28 August–27 October 1780 George Washington

In late August 1780, Gen. George Washington was buoyed by expectations that French reinforcements would participate in an attack on New York City and that a southern army was poised to advance through South Carolina and possibly regain Charleston. News soon reached him that a key division was... More


Of Courtiers and Princes

Stories of Lower Court Clerks and Their Judges Edited by Todd C. Peppers

Praise for In Chambers: "This new collection of essays, including some by former clerks, takes readers inside justices’ chambers for a look at clerkship life.... [T]he best parts of the book are the behind-the-scenes descriptions of life at the court."— Associated Press"An excellent book... It’s... More


Patriots, Prostitutes, and Spies

Women and the Mexican-American War John M. Belohlavek

In Patriots, Prostitutes, and Spies, John M. Belohlavek tells the story of women on both sides of the Mexican-American War (1846-48) as they were propelled by the bloody conflict to adopt new roles and expand traditional ones.American women "back home" functioned as anti-war activists, pro-war... More


Marketing Analytics

Essential Tools for Data-Driven Decisions Rajkumar Venkatesan, Paul W. Farris, and Ronald T. Wilcox

The authors of the pioneering Cutting-Edge Marketing Analytics return to the vital conversation of leveraging big data with Marketing Analytics: Essential Tools for Data-Driven Decisions, which updates and expands on the earlier book as we enter the 2020s. As they illustrate, big data analytics is... More


Against Popery

Britain, Empire, and Anti-Catholicism Edited by Evan Haefeli

Although commonly regarded as a prejudice against Roman Catholics and their religion, anti-popery is both more complex and far more historically significant than this common conception would suggest. As the essays collected in this volume demonstrate, anti-popery is a powerful lens through which to... More


A German Barber-Surgeon in the Atlantic Slave Trade

The Seventeenth-Century Journal of Johann Peter Oettinger Johann Peter Oettinger. Edited and translated by Craig Koslofsky and Roberto Zaugg

As he traveled across Germany and the Netherlands and sailed on Dutch and Brandenburg slave ships to the Caribbean and Africa from 1682 to 1696, the young German barber-surgeon Johann Peter Oettinger (1666–1746) recorded his experiences in a detailed journal, discovered by Roberto Zaugg and Craig... More


Slavery, Freedom, and Expansion in the Early American West

John Craig Hammond

Most treatments of slavery, politics, and expansion in the early American republic focus narrowly on congressional debates and the inaction of elite "founding fathers" such as Thomas Jefferson and James Madison. In Slavery, Freedom, and Expansion in the Early American West, John Craig Hammond looks... More


Backlash

Libel, Impeachment, and Populism in the Reign of Queen Anne Rachel Carnell

A country bitterly divided between two political parties. Populist mobs rising in support of a reactionary rabble-rouser. Foreign interference in the political process. Strained relations between Britain and Europe. These are not recent headlines—they are from the year 1710, when Queen Anne ruled... More


The Selected Papers of John Jay

1794–1798 John Jay. Edited by Elizabeth M. Nuxoll

Volume 6 opens with John Jay aboard the Ohio, bound for London in May 1794, to begin what will prove to be the most controversial mission of his career: the negotiation of the treaty that now bears his name. The volume documents the series of proposals and drafts that culminated in the treaty, as... More


Colonial Williamsburg: The Story

From the Colonial Era to the Restoration Edward G. Lengel

It was in Williamsburg, Virginia, that American independence—and democracy—took root. And it is in the Historic Area of Colonial Williamsburg that millions have learned about the continuing relevance of America’s founding ideas. Spanning nearly five centuries, Williamsburg: The Story chronicles the... More


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