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History and Political Science


Transient and Permanent

The Transcendentalist Movement and Its Contexts


Edited by Charles Capper and Conrad Edick Wright

Comprising twenty essays by leading scholars, this insightful collection provides the best recent writing on the Transcendentalists, the New England religious reformers and intellectuals who challenged both spiritual and secular orthodoxies between the 1830s and the 1850s. The volume addresses... More


The Tactics of Toleration

A Refugee Community in the Age of Religious War


Jesse A. Spohnholz

[Book description not available]


Women as Translators in Early Modern England



Deborah Uman

[Book description not available]


Radical Reform

Interracial Politics in Post-Emancipation North Carolina


Deborah Beckel

Radical Reform describes a remarkable chapter in the American pro-democracy movement. It portrays the largely unknown leaders of the interracial Republican Party who struggled for political, civil, and labor rights in North Carolina after the Civil War. In so doing, they paved the way for the... More


Merely Judgment

Ignoring, Evading, and Trumping the Supreme Court


Martin J. Sweet

Merely Judgment uses affirmative action in government contracting, legislative vetoes, flag burning, hate speech, and school prayer as windows for understanding how Supreme Court decisions send signals regarding the Court’s policy preferences to institutions and actors (such as lower courts,... More


The Big House after Slavery

Virginia Plantation Families and Their Postbellum Domestic Experiment


Amy Feely Morsman

The Big House after Slavery examines the economic, social, and political challenges that Virginia planter families faced following Confederate defeat and emancipation. Amy Feely Morsman addresses how men and women of the planter class responded to postwar problems and how their adaptations to life... More


A Young Virginia Boatman Navigates the Civil War

The Journals of George Randolph Wood


George Randolph Wood. Edited by Will Molineux. Introduction by Scott Nelson

George Randolph Wood filled several journal books with personal remembrances of life in nineteenth-century Hampton, Virginia; particularly of his experiences aboard river and canal boats transporting supplies for Confederate troops along the James River during the Civil War. Wood wrote about his... More


Jefferson, Lincoln, and Wilson

The American Dilemma of Race and Democracy


Edited by John Milton Cooper, Jr., and Thomas J. Knock

Jefferson, Lincoln, and Wilson: The American Dilemma of Race and Democracy seeks to explore how the collision of races shaped American democracy in the lives, thought, and actions of three of the nation’s most important presidents. Each of them led the nation in a different epoch, during times... More


Seeing Jefferson Anew

In His Time and Ours


edited by John B. Boles and Randal L. Hall

Thomas Jefferson’s ideas have been so important in shaping the character and aspirations of the United States that it has proven impossible to think about the state of the nation at almost any moment without implicit or explicit reference to his words and actions. In similar fashion, each... More


This Glorious Struggle

George Washington's Revolutionary War Letters


edited by Edward G. Lengel

George Washington wrote an astonishing number of letters, both personal and professional. The majority—about 140,000 documents—are from his years as commander in chief during the Revolutionary War, from 1775 to 1783. This Glorious Struggle presents a selection of Washington’s most important and... More


Battle over the Bench

Senators, Interest Groups, and Lower Court Confirmations


Amy Steigerwalt

Who gets seated on the lower federal courts and why? Why are some nominees confirmed easily while others travel a long, hard road to confirmation? What role do senators and interest groups play in determining who will become a federal judge? The lower federal courts have increasingly become the... More


A Passion for the Past

The Odyssey of a Transatlantic Archaeologist


Ivor Noël Hume

Ivor Noël Hume has devoted his life to uncovering countless lives that came before him. In A Passion for the Past the world-renowned archaeologist turns to his own life, sharing with the reader a story that begins amid the bombed-out rubble of post–World War II London and ends on North Carolina’s... More


The Papers of George Washington
Revolutionary War Series, vol. 20
8 April-31 May 1779


George Washington. Edited by Edward G. Lengel

Volume 20 of the Revolutionary War Series covers 8 April to 31 May 1779. As it begins, Washington is gathering intelligence in preparation for a summer expedition against the Iroquois Confederacy. After considering various intelligence reports compiled with the help of scouts and spies, he issued... More


Governing the Commonwealth



Robert Dudley

Governing the Commonwealth provides middle-school students with an introduction to Virginia’s government: its structure, processes, powers, and scope. The middle-school civics curriculum requires teachers to cover Virginia’s government, and there has not been a useful text to do this until now.... More


Henry Hulton and the American Revolution

An Outsider's Inside View


Neil Longley York

Henry Hulton was an Englishman who moved to Boston in 1767 as a member of the new American Board of Customs Commissioners. The board was supposed to curtail smuggling and bring greater efficiency to the administration of empire. It failed, and Hulton fled Massachusetts in 1776, joining an exodus of... More


The Papers of George Washington
Revolutionary War Series, vol. 19
15 January – 7 April 1779


George Washington. Edited by Philander D. Chase and William M. Ferraro

Volume 19 of the Revolutionary War Series documents Washington’s activities during the winter and early spring of 1779, when the bulk of his army was encamped at Middlebrook, New Jersey, strategically situated where the Watchung Mountains rise from the coastal plain in the middle of the state.... More


On the Trail of the D.C. Sniper

Fear and the Media


Jack R. Censer. with the assistance of William Miller

For a month in the fall of 2002, a series of sniper attacks suddenly dominated the headlines in the nation’s capital. Beginning in the Washington suburbs, these crimes eventually stretched over one hundred miles along I-95 to Richmond. More than a thousand law officers would pursue the perpetrators... More


The Selected Papers of John Jay

1760–1779


John Jay. Edited by Elizabeth M. Nuxoll. Introduction by Jack N. Rakove

Few leaders of the new American nation had more influence than John Jay (1745–1829), or could match his contributions in all three branches of government, at both state and national levels. A leading representative of New York in the Continental Congress, Jay became one of the American... More


Showdown in Virginia

The 1861 Convention and the Fate of the Union


edited by William W. Freehling and Craig M. Simpson

In the spring of 1861, Virginians confronted destiny—their own and their nation’s. Pivotal decisions awaited about secession, the consequences of which would unfold for a hundred years and more. But few Virginians wanted to decide at all. Instead, they talked, almost interminably. The remarkable... More


Witchcraft and the Papacy

An Account Drawing on the Formerly Secret Records of the Roman Inquisition


Rainer Decker. Translated by H. C. Erik Midelfort

When Rainer Decker was researching a sensational seventeenth-century German witchcraft trial, he discovered, much to his surprise, that in this case the papacy functioned as a force of skepticism and restraint. His curiosity piqued, he tried unsuccessfully to gain access to a secret Vatican archive... More


Portrait of a Patriot

The Major Political and Legal Papers of Josiah Quincy Junior


Josiah Quincy, Jr. Edited by Daniel R. Coquillette and Neil Longley York

The most unique and important of all early American law reports are those of Josiah Quincy Jr. (1744–1775). These are the first reports of continental America’s oldest court, the Superior Court of Judicature of the Province of Massachusetts Bay, direct ancestor to today’s Massachusetts Supreme... More


Portrait of a Patriot

The Major Political and Legal Papers of Josiah Quincy Junior


Josiah Quincy, Jr. Edited by Daniel R. Coquillette and Neil Longley York

The most unique and important of all early American law reports are those of Josiah Quincy Jr. (1744–1775). These are the first reports of continental America’s oldest court, the Superior Court of Judicature of the Province of Massachusetts Bay, direct ancestor to today’s Massachusetts Supreme... More


The Eleanor Roosevelt Papers

The Human Rights Years, 1945-1948


Eleanor Roosevelt. edited by Allida Black

"Eleanor Roosevelt once asked, ‘Where do human rights begin? In small places, close to home, so close and so small that they cannot be seen on any maps of the world. Such are the places where every man, woman, and child seeks equal justice, equal opportunity, equal dignity without discrimination.’... More


Old World, New World

America and Europe in the Age of Jefferson


Edited by Leonard J. Sadosky, Peter Nicolaisen, Peter S. Onuf, and Andrew J. O’Shaughnessy

Old World, New World: America and Europe in the Age of Jefferson grew out of workshops in Salzburg and Charlottesville sponsored by Monticello’s International Center for Jefferson Studies, and revisits a question of long-standing interest to American historians: the nature of the relationship... More


Contract and Consent

Representation and the Jury in Anglo-American Legal History


J. R. Pole

In Contract and Consent, the renowned legal historian J. R. Pole posits that legal history has become highly specialized, while mainstream political and social historians frequently ignore cases that figure prominently in the legal literature. Pole makes a start at remedying the situation with a... More


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