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History and Political Science


A Passion for the Past
The Odyssey of a Transatlantic Archaeologist Ivor Noël Hume

Ivor Noël Hume has devoted his life to uncovering countless lives that came before him. In A Passion for the Past the world-renowned archaeologist turns to his own life, sharing with the reader a story that begins amid the bombed-out rubble of post–World War II London and ends on North Carolina’s... More


The Papers of George Washington
Revolutionary War Series, vol. 208 April-31 May 1779 George Washington. Edited by Edward G. Lengel

Volume 20 of the Revolutionary War Series covers 8 April to 31 May 1779. As it begins, Washington is gathering intelligence in preparation for a summer expedition against the Iroquois Confederacy. After considering various intelligence reports compiled with the help of scouts and spies, he issued... More


Governing the Commonwealth
Robert Dudley

Governing the Commonwealth provides middle-school students with an introduction to Virginia’s government: its structure, processes, powers, and scope. The middle-school civics curriculum requires teachers to cover Virginia’s government, and there has not been a useful text to do this until now.... More


Henry Hulton and the American Revolution
An Outsider's Inside View Neil Longley York

Henry Hulton was an Englishman who moved to Boston in 1767 as a member of the new American Board of Customs Commissioners. The board was supposed to curtail smuggling and bring greater efficiency to the administration of empire. It failed, and Hulton fled Massachusetts in 1776, joining an exodus of... More


The Papers of George Washington
Revolutionary War Series, vol. 1915 January – 7 April 1779 George Washington. Edited by Philander D. Chase and William M. Ferraro

Volume 19 of the Revolutionary War Series documents Washington’s activities during the winter and early spring of 1779, when the bulk of his army was encamped at Middlebrook, New Jersey, strategically situated where the Watchung Mountains rise from the coastal plain in the middle of the state.... More


On the Trail of the D.C. Sniper
Fear and the Media Jack R. Censer. with the assistance of William Miller

For a month in the fall of 2002, a series of sniper attacks suddenly dominated the headlines in the nation’s capital. Beginning in the Washington suburbs, these crimes eventually stretched over one hundred miles along I-95 to Richmond. More than a thousand law officers would pursue the perpetrators... More


The Selected Papers of John Jay
1760–1779 John Jay. Edited by Elizabeth M. Nuxoll. Introduction by Jack N. Rakove

Few leaders of the new American nation had more influence than John Jay (1745–1829), or could match his contributions in all three branches of government, at both state and national levels. A leading representative of New York in the Continental Congress, Jay became one of the American... More


Showdown in Virginia
The 1861 Convention and the Fate of the Union edited by William W. Freehling and Craig M. Simpson

In the spring of 1861, Virginians confronted destiny—their own and their nation’s. Pivotal decisions awaited about secession, the consequences of which would unfold for a hundred years and more. But few Virginians wanted to decide at all. Instead, they talked, almost interminably. The remarkable... More


Witchcraft and the Papacy
An Account Drawing on the Formerly Secret Records of the Roman Inquisition Rainer Decker. Translated by H. C. Erik Midelfort

When Rainer Decker was researching a sensational seventeenth-century German witchcraft trial, he discovered, much to his surprise, that in this case the papacy functioned as a force of skepticism and restraint. His curiosity piqued, he tried unsuccessfully to gain access to a secret Vatican archive... More


Portrait of a Patriot
The Major Political and Legal Papers of Josiah Quincy Junior Josiah Quincy, Jr. Edited by Daniel R. Coquillette and Neil Longley York

The most unique and important of all early American law reports are those of Josiah Quincy Jr. (1744–1775). These are the first reports of continental America’s oldest court, the Superior Court of Judicature of the Province of Massachusetts Bay, direct ancestor to today’s Massachusetts Supreme... More


Portrait of a Patriot
The Major Political and Legal Papers of Josiah Quincy Junior Josiah Quincy, Jr. Edited by Daniel R. Coquillette and Neil Longley York

The most unique and important of all early American law reports are those of Josiah Quincy Jr. (1744–1775). These are the first reports of continental America’s oldest court, the Superior Court of Judicature of the Province of Massachusetts Bay, direct ancestor to today’s Massachusetts Supreme... More


The Eleanor Roosevelt Papers
The Human Rights Years, 1945-1948 Eleanor Roosevelt. Edited by Allida Black

"Eleanor Roosevelt once asked, ‘Where do human rights begin? In small places, close to home, so close and so small that they cannot be seen on any maps of the world. Such are the places where every man, woman, and child seeks equal justice, equal opportunity, equal dignity without discrimination.’... More


Old World, New World
America and Europe in the Age of Jefferson Edited by Leonard J. Sadosky, Peter Nicolaisen, Peter S. Onuf, and Andrew J. O’Shaughnessy

Old World, New World: America and Europe in the Age of Jefferson grew out of workshops in Salzburg and Charlottesville sponsored by Monticello’s International Center for Jefferson Studies, and revisits a question of long-standing interest to American historians: the nature of the relationship... More


Contract and Consent
Representation and the Jury in Anglo-American Legal History J. R. Pole

In Contract and Consent, the renowned legal historian J. R. Pole posits that legal history has become highly specialized, while mainstream political and social historians frequently ignore cases that figure prominently in the legal literature. Pole makes a start at remedying the situation with a... More


Accommodating Revolutions
Virginia's Northern Neck in an Era of Transformations, 1760-1810 Albert H. Tillson, Jr.

Accommodating Revolutions addresses a controversy of long standing among historians of eighteenth-century America and Virginia—the extent to which internal conflict and/or consensus characterized the society of the Revolutionary era. In particular, it emphasizes the complex and often self-... More


Mongrel Nation
The America Begotten by Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemings Clarence E. Walker

The debate over the affair between Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemings rarely rises above the question of "Did they or didn’t they?" But lost in the argument over the existence of such a relationship are equally urgent questions about a history that is more complex, both sexually and culturally,... More


Revolutionary Negotiations
Indians, Empires, and Diplomats in the Founding of America Leonard J. Sadosky

Revolutionary Negotiations examines early American diplomatic negotiations with both the European powers and the various American Indian nations from the 1740s through the 1820s. Sadosky interweaves previously distinct settings for American diplomacy—courts and council fires—into one singular,... More


What Reconstruction Meant
Historical Memory in the American South Bruce E. Baker

A great deal has been written about southern memory centering on the Civil War, particularly the view of the war as a valiant lost cause. In this challenging new book Bruce Baker looks at a related, and equally important, aspect of southern memory that has been treated by historians only in passing... More


Building Charleston
Town and Society in the Eighteenth-Century British Atlantic World Emma Hart

In the colonial era, Charleston, South Carolina, was the largest city in the American South. From 1700 to 1775 its growth rate was exceeded in the New World only by that of Philadelphia. The first comprehensive study of this crucial colonial center, Building Charleston charts the rise of one of... More


Law, Politics, and Perception
How Policy Preferences Influence Legal Reasoning Eileen Braman

Are judges' decisions more likely to be based on personal inclinations or legal authority? The answer, Eileen Braman argues, is both. Law, Politics, and Perception brings cognitive psychology to bear on the question of the relative importance of norms of legal reasoning versus decision markers'... More


Empires of the Imagination
Transatlantic Histories of the Louisiana Purchase Peter J. Kastor and Francois Weil, eds.

Empires of the Imagination takes the Louisiana Purchase as a point of departure for a compelling new discussion of the interaction between France and the United States. In addition to offering the first substantive synthesis of this transatlantic relationship, the essays collected here offer new... More


Rome Reborn on Western Shores
Historical Imagination and the Creation of the American Republic Eran Shalev

Rome Reborn on Western Shores examines the literature of the Revolutionary era to explore the ways in which American patriots employed the classics and to assess antiquity's importance to the early political culture of the United States. Where other writers have concentrated on political theory and... More


The Papers of James Madison
1817-1820 James Madison. Edited by David B. Mattern, J. C. A. Stagg, Mary Parke Johnson, and Anne Mandeville Colony

The Papers of James Madison project, housed at the University of Virginia, was established in 1956 to publish annotated volumes of the correspondence and writings of James Madison, the Virginia statesman most often remembered for his public service as "Father of the Constitution" and as fourth... More


"Evil People"
A Comparative Study of Witch Hunts in Swabian Austria and the Electorate of Trier Johannes Dillinger. translated by Laura Stokes

Inspired by recent efforts to understand the dynamics of the early modern witch hunt, Johannes Dillinger has produced a powerful synthesis based on careful comparisons. Narrowing his focus to two specific regions—Swabian Austria and the Electorate of Trier—he provides a nuanced explanation of how... More


Fixing College Education
A New Curriculum for the Twenty-first Century Charles Muscatine

Since his early days at the University of California, Berkeley, when he was fired for refusing to sign a loyalty oath during the Red Scare, Charles Muscatine has been a dedicated teacher and higher education reformer. Upon his reinstatement at Berkeley, he founded "Strawberry Creek College," a six-... More


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