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History and Political Science


George Washington

First in War


Dave R. Palmer. Foreword by General Colin L. Powell

George Washington’s long career as soldier began with defeat as a young line officer in the bloody frontier skirmishes of the French and Indian War; it culminated in the role of commanding general of the Continental army in victory over the British army. This soldier’s life included long years of... More


George Washington

Pioneer Farmer


Alan Fusonie. Foreword by Nancy Kassebaum Baker

This volume provides a fresh historical focus on George Washington as a pioneer farmer actively engaged in a new approach to agriculture: one based on a more scientific attitude toward crops, farm animals, and the land. As Alan and Donna Jean Fusonie examined his correspondence and diaries, the... More


Slavery at the Home of George Washington



Philip J. Schwarz, ed.

George Washington inherited his first slave at the age of eleven, and he was the only founding father to free his slaves in his will. This highly readable selection of articles focuses on Washington’s changing attitudes toward the institution of slavery and his everyday relationships with the... More


The Presidency of George Washington



Jack D. Warren, Jr. Foreword by George H. W. Bush

In the first specialized study of the Washington presidency published in a generation, the historian Jack D. Warren Jr. outlines the first president’s practical accomplishments: the establishment of the executive as an energetic and effective branch of government; the resolution of the new nation’s... More


Tigers in Africa

Stalking the Past at the Cape of Good Hope


Carmel Schrire

A characteristically unconventional and engaging work, Carmel Schrire’s Tigers in Africa: Stalking the Past at the Cape of Good Hope interweaves such diverse themes as colonial slavery and apartheid, human and carnivore evolution, and science and romance to show how we create the past and... More


Freedom's Promise

Ex-Slave Families and Citizenship in the Age of Emancipation


Elizabeth Regosin

Emancipation and the citizenship that followed conferred upon former slaves the right to create family relationships that were sanctioned, recognized, and regulated by the laws that governed the families of all American citizens. Elizabeth Regosin explores what the acquisition of this legal... More


Bathed in Blood

Hunting and Mastery in the Old South


Nicolas W. Proctor

The hunt, like the church, courthouse, and family, played an integral role in southern society and culture during the antebellum era. Regardless of color or class, southern men hunted. Although hunters always recognized the tangible gains of their mission—meat, hides, furs—they also used the hunt... More


Parlor Politics

In Which the Ladies of Washington Help Build a City and a Government


Catherine Allgor

When Thomas Jefferson moved his victorious Republican administration into the new capital city in 1801, one of his first acts was to abolish any formal receptions, except on New Year's Day and the Fourth of July. His successful campaign for the presidency had been partially founded on the idea that... More


The Papers of George Washington
Revolutionary War Series, vol. 12
October-December 1777


George Washington. Edited by Philander D. Chase

Volume 12 of the Revolutionary War Series documents Washington's unsuccessful efforts to capitalize on the American victory at Saratoga and his decision to encamp the Continental army for the winter at Valley Forge. The volume opens with the British forces at Philadelphia, where they had returned... More


Two Novels by Mary Chestnut.



Mary Boykin Chesnut and Elizabeth Muhlenfeld. introduction by Elizabeth Han

As the well-educated and socially skilled wife of a prominent Confederate, Mary Boykin Miller Chesnut (1823-86) was ideally situated—and intellectually equipped—to record the narrative of daily life in the Confederacy during the Civil War. Yet while she is widely recognized for the significant... More


Principle and Interest

Thomas Jefferson and the Problem of Debt


Herbert E. Sloan

In this acclaimed work, available here for the first time in paperback, Herbert E. Sloan examines Thomas Jefferson's complex and obsessive relationship to debt—its roles in his life and political career, and in the formation of republican ideology. As party leader in the 1790s, and later as... More


Coming to Terms with Democracy

Federalist Intellectuals and the Shaping of an American Culture, 1800–1828


Marshall Foletta

William Tudor, Willard Phillips, and Richard Henry Dana were not their fathers' Federalists. When these young New England intellectuals and their contemporaries attempted to carve out a place for themselves in the rapidly changing and increasingly unfriendly culture of the early nineteenth century... More


Lucy Stone

Pioneer of Woman's Rights


Alice Stone Blackwell. Introduction by Randolph Hollinghurst

Alice Stone Blackwell, editor of the Woman's Journal, published this biography of her mother, Lucy Stone, in 1930, a decade after the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment. Reprinted now for the first time, Lucy Stone: Pioneer of Woman's Rights is a fascinating, plainspoken document of an... More


At the Picture Show

Small-Town Audiences and the Creation of Movie Fan Culture


Kathryn H. Fuller

The motion picture industry in its earliest days seemed as ephemeral as the flickering images it produced. Considered an amusement fad even by their exhibitors, movies nevertheless spread quickly from big-city vaudeville houses to towns and rural communities across the nation. Small-town audiences... More


Ashe County's Civil War

Community and Society in the Appalachian South


Martin Crawford

Distinguished from traditional historical narrative by its balanced portrayal of wartime experiences both at home and on the battlefield and flavored by its vivid portrayal of a divided Appalachian community, Ashe County's Civil War: Community and Society in the Appalachian South breaks new ground... More


Bacchus and Civic Order

The Culture of Drink in Early Modern Germany


B. Ann Tlusty

Lining the streets inside the city's gates, clustered in its center, and thinly scattered among its back quarters were Augsburg's taverns and drinking rooms. These institutions ranged from the poorly lit rooms of backstreet wine sellers to the elaborate marble halls frequented by society's most... More


The Papers of George Washington
Revolutionary War Series, vol. 11
August-October 1777


George Washington. Edited by Philander D. Chase

Volume 11 of the Revolutionary War Series contains correspondence, orders, and other documents covering one of the most militarily active periods of the war. The volume begins with Washington's army camped about twenty miles north of Philadelphia. Having planned to march toward the Hudson River to... More


Exile in Richmond

The Confederate Journal of Henri Garidel


Michael Bedout Chesson and Leslie Jean Roberts, eds.

Expelled from occupied New Orleans by Federal forces after refusing to pledge loyalty to the Union, Henri Garidel remained in exile from his home and family from 1863 to 1865. Lonely, homesick, and alienated, the French-Catholic Garidel, a clerk in the Confederate Bureau of Ordnance, was a complete... More


Founding Friendship

George Washington, James Madison, and the Creation of the American Republic


Stuart Leibiger

Although the friendship between George Washington and James Madison was eclipsed in the early 1790s by the alliances of Madison with Jefferson and Washington with Hamilton, their collaboration remains central to the constitutional revolution that launched the American experiment in republican... More


The Southern Agrarians and the New Deal

Essays after I'll Take My Stand


Emily S. Bingham and Thomas A. Underwood, eds.

Scholars frequently assume that the Southern Agrarian movement was limited to the philosophy laid out in the landmark 1930 book I'll Take My Stand. Yet that work consisted mainly of a philosophical critique of a nation that valued "progress" above spirituality. Were it not for the Agrarians' angry... More


A History of the European Economy, 1000-2000



Francois Crouzet

Considering Europe as a whole rather than as a mosaic of individual states, François Crouzet presents here an accessible, engaging history of the European economy during the second millennium.Stressing the common economic institutions shared over time by the different regions of Europe and the... More


Judicial Independence in the Age of Democracy

Critical Perspectives from around the World


Peter H. Russell and David M. O'Brien, eds.

This collection of essays by leading scholars of constitutional law looks at a critical component of constitutional democracy--judicial independence--from an international comparative perspective. Peter H. Russell's introduction outlines a general theory of judicial independence, while the... More


George Washington Reconsidered



Don Higginbotham, ed.

George Washington, heroic general of the Revolution, master of Mount Vernon, and first president of the United States, remains the most enigmatic figure of the founding generation, with historians and the public at large still arguing over the strengths of his character and the nature of his... More


A Southern Practice

The Diary and Autobiography of Charles A Hentz, MD


Steven Stowe, ed.

As a physician practicing in the rural South in the years leading up to and through the Civil War, Charles Arnould Hentz (1827-1894) lived in the midst of enormous changes in southern society and medicine.A Southern Practice includes the diary that Hentz kept for more than twenty years, beginning... More


Black Prisoners and Their World, Alabama, 1865-1900



Mary Ellen Curtin

In the late nineteenth century, prisoners in Alabama, the vast majority of them African Americans, were forced to work as coal miners under the most horrendous conditions imaginable. Black Prisoners and Their World draws on a variety of sources, including the reports and correspondence of prison... More


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