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History and Political Science


The Case for Identity Politics

Polarization, Demographic Change, and Racial Appeals Christopher T. Stout

Following the defeat of Hillary Clinton in the presidential election of 2016, many prominent scholars and political pundits argued that a successful Democratic Party in the future must abandon identity politics. While these calls for Democrats to distance themselves from such strategies have... More


First and Always

A New Portrait of George Washington Peter R. Henriques

George Washington may be the most famous American who ever lived, and certainly is one of the most admired. While surrounded by myths, it is no myth that the man who led Americans’ fight for independence and whose two terms in office largely defined the presidency was the most highly respected... More


Armed Citizens

The Road from Ancient Rome to the Second Amendment Noah Shusterman

Although much has changed in the United States since the eighteenth century, our framework for gun laws still largely relies on the Second Amendment and the patterns that emerged in the colonial era. America has long been a heavily armed, and racially divided, society, yet few citizens understand... More


Belzoni

The Giant Archaeologists Love to Hate Ivor Noël Hume

The Italian son of a barber. A failed hydraulic engineer. A giant who performed feats of strength and agility in the circus. Giovanni Belzoni (1778–1824) was all of these before going on to become one of the most controversial figures in the history of Egyptian archaeology. A man of exceptional... More


Yuletide in Dixie

Slavery, Christmas, and Southern Memory Robert E. May

How did enslaved African Americans in the Old South really experience Christmas? Did Christmastime provide slaves with a lengthy and jubilant respite from labor and the whip, as is generally assumed, or is the story far more complex and troubling? In this provocative, revisionist, and sometimes... More


Conceived in Crisis

The Revolutionary Creation of an American State Christopher R. Pearl

Conceived in Crisis argues that the American Revolution was not just the product of the Imperial Crisis, brought on by Parliament’s attempt to impose a new idea of empire on the American colonies. To an equal or greater degree, it was a response to the inability of individual colonial governments... More


Furnace and Fugue

A Digital Edition of Michael Maier's "Atalanta fugiens" (1618) with Scholarly Commentary Edited by Tara Nummedal and Donna Bilak

An Innovative New Open-Access ResourceIn 1618, on the eve of the Thirty Years’ War, the German alchemist and physician Michael Maier published Atalanta fugiens, an intriguing and complex musical alchemical emblem book designed to engage the ear, eye, and intellect. The book unfolds as a series of... More


Colossal Ambitions

Confederate Planning for a Post–Civil War World Adrian Brettle

Leading politicians, diplomats, clerics, planters, farmers, manufacturers, and merchants preached a transformative, world-historical role for the Confederacy, persuading many of their compatriots to fight not merely to retain what they had but to gain their future empire. Impervious to reality,... More


Newest Born of Nations

European Nationalist Movements and the Making of the Confederacy Ann L. Tucker

From the earliest stirrings of southern nationalism to the defeat of the Confederacy, analysis of European nationalist movements played a critical role in how southerners thought about their new southern nation. Southerners argued that because the Confederate nation was cast in the same mold as its... More


The Papers of George Washington

22 September 1796-3 March 1797 George Washington. Edited by Adrina Garbooshian-Huggins

The concluding volume of the Presidential Series begins following the publication of Washington’s Farewell Address, which was circulated widely in newspapers and drew reactions from citizens across the nation. With his approaching retirement from the presidency, Washington tended to a number of... More


The Papers of James Madison

1 May 1816-3 March 1817, with a supplement, 1809-1815 James Madison. Edited by J. C. A. Stagg, Mary Parke Johnson, Katharine E. Harbury, and Anne Mandeville Colony

The final volume of the Presidential Series covers Madison’s last ten months in office, during which he maintained a busy schedule despite taking the longest summer vacation in all his time in Washington. Foreign policy was dominated by crises with Spain and Algiers. Negotiations with Great Britain... More


Suicide

The Social Causes of Self-Destruction Jason Manning

The conventional approach to suicide is psychiatric: ask the average person why people kill themselves, and they will likely cite depression. But this approach fails to recognize suicide’s social causes. People kill themselves because of breakups and divorces, because of lost jobs and ruined... More


The Devil's Art

Divination and Discipline in Early Modern Germany Jason Philip Coy

In early modern Germany, soothsayers known as wise women and men roamed the countryside. Fixtures of village life, they identified thieves and witches, read palms, and cast horoscopes. German villagers regularly consulted these fortune-tellers and practiced divination in their everyday lives. Jason... More


The Correspondence of Thomas Hutchinson

1767-1769 Thomas Hutchinson. Edited by John W. Tyler and Elizabeth Dubrulle

The second volume of Thomas Hutchinson’s correspondence covers the years 1767 through 1769. In 1767, Charles Townshend's new taxes, in addition to his ambitious plans to improve customs enforcement and render crown officials in the colonies more independent of local assemblies, caused increasing... More


The Silent Prologue

How Judicial Philosophies Shape Our Constitutional Rights Ofer Raban

The U.S. Constitution contains a series of rights and liberties operating as restrictions on the powers of government, and courts have the final authority to determine what these often nebulous restrictions require. But judges are deeply divided over the correct methodology to follow in making... More


The Papers of George Washington
Revolutionary War Series, Volume 27
5 July-27 August 1780 George Washington and Benjamin L. Huggins

Three major themes dominate George Washington’s correspondence in volume 27 of the Revolutionary War Series: the arrival of a French expeditionary army and navy, the urgent need to prepare the Continental army for a joint Franco-American offensive to take New York City, and the cultivation of... More


The Worst Passions of Human Nature

White Supremacy in the Civil War North Paul D. Escott

The American North’s commitment to preventing a southern secession rooted in slaveholding suggests a society united in its opposition to slavery and racial inequality. The reality, however, was far more complex and troubling. In his latest book, Paul Escott lays bare the contrast between progress... More


Lighting the Way

Federal Courts, Civil Rights, and Public Policy Douglas Rice

Do our federal courts, including the Supreme Court, lead or merely implement public policy? This is a critical question in the study and practice of law, with a long history of continued dispute and contradictory evidence. In Lighting the Way, Douglas Rice systematically examines both sides of this... More


After Virginia Tech

Guns, Safety, and Healing in the Era of Mass Shootings Thomas P. Kapsidelis

In what has become the era of the mass shooting, we are routinely taken to scenes of terrible violence. Often neglected, however, is the long aftermath, including the efforts to effect change in the wake of such tragedies. On April 16, 2007, thirty-two Virginia Tech students and professors were... More


The False Cause

Fraud, Fabrication, and White Supremacy in Confederate Memory Adam H. Domby

The Lost Cause ideology that emerged after the Civil War and flourished in the early twentieth century in essence sought to recast a struggle to perpetuate slavery as a heroic defense of the South. As Adam Domby reveals here, this was not only an insidious goal; it was founded on falsehoods. The... More


Redemption from Tyranny

Herman Husband's American Revolution Bruce E. Stewart

For many common people, the American Revolution offered an opportunity to radically reimagine the wealth and power structures in the nascent United States. Yet in the eyes of working-class activists, the U.S. Constitution favored the interests of a corrupt elite and betrayed the lofty principles of... More


Slavery and War in the Americas

Race, Citizenship, and State Building in the United States and Brazil, 1861-1870 Vitor Izecksohn

In this pathbreaking new work, Vitor Izecksohn attempts to shed new light on the American Civil War by comparing it to a strikingly similar campaign in South America--the War of the Triple Alliance of 1864–70, which galvanized four countries and became the longest large-scale international conflict... More


The Papers of George Washington

1 April-21 September 1796 George Washington. Edited by David R. Hoth and William M. Ferraro

Throughout volume 20 of the Presidential Series, George Washington looked forward to retirement from public life, preparing a farewell address to announce his intention and leave behind guiding principles for the nation. Relations with Great Britain and France dominated foreign policy, as the House... More


The Records of Kings Chapel, Boston

Edited by James B. Bell and James E. Mooney

The story of the origins of the first Anglican congregation established in Boston and New England, Kings Chapel, is significantly shaped by the gradually emerging imperial policies of the government of Charles II during the late seventeenth century. It is a transatlantic account influenced largely... More


The Records of Kings Chapel, Boston

Edited by James B. Bell and James E. Mooney

[Book description not available]


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