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History and Political Science


What Time and Sadness Spared

Mother and Son Confront the Holocaust


Roma Nutkiewicz Ben-Atar. with Doron S. Ben-Atar

Roma Ben-Atar resisted until late in life the urging of her family to share the memories of her Nazi-era experiences. The Holocaust exerted a dark pressure on all of their lives but was never openly discussed. It was only when her granddaughter insisted on hearing the whole truth, with a directness... More


Jamestown, the Truth Revealed



William M. Kelso

What was life really like for the band of adventurers who first set foot on the banks of the James River in 1607? Important as the accomplishments of these men and women were, the written records pertaining to them are scarce, ambiguous, and often conflicting. In Jamestown, the Truth Revealed,... More


Handcuffs and Chain Link

Criminalizing the Undocumented in America


Benjamin Gonzalez O'Brien

Handcuffs and Chain Link enters the immigration debate by addressing one of its most controversial aspects: the criminalization both of extralegal immigration to the United States and of immigrants themselves in popular and political discourse. Looking at the factors that led up to criminalization... More


The Queen of America

Mary Cutts's Life of Dolley Madison


Mary Cutts. Edited by Catherine Allgor. Foreword by Cokie Roberts

For biographers and fans of Dolley Payne Todd Madison, Mary Cutts's memoir of her famous aunt has been indispensable. Because Madison left behind no account of her life, the common assumption has been that Cutts’s account is the closest we have to Madison's autobiographical voice. With this new,... More


George Washington's Barbados Diary, 1751-52



George Washington. Edited by Alicia K. Anderson and Lynn A. Price

In the autumn of 1751, at the age of nineteen, George Washington sailed with his older half-brother Lawrence from Virginia to the Caribbean island of Barbados—the one and only time that the future Revolutionary War hero and president would leave the shores of continental North America. Lawrence had... More


The Papers of Robert Treat Paine, 1778-1786



Robert Treat Paine. Edited by Edward W. Hanson

The fourth volume of this series encompasses Robert Treat Paine’s time as Massachusetts attorney general. Paine, best known as a signer of the Declaration of Independence, spent the remainder of his public career in state service. The documents in this volume highlight the quest for order in a... More


Becoming Men of Some Consequence

Youth and Military Service in the Revolutionary War


John A. Ruddiman

Young Continental soldiers carried a heavy burden in the American Revolution. Their experiences of coming of age during the upheavals of war provide a novel perspective on the Revolutionary era, eliciting questions of gender, family life, economic goals, and politics. "Going for a soldier" forced... More


Jefferson on Display

Attire, Etiquette, and the Art of Presentation


G. S. Wilson

When we think of Thomas Jefferson, a certain picture comes to mind for some of us, combining his physical appearance with our perception of his character. During Jefferson’s lifetime this image was already taking shape, helped along by his own assiduous cultivation. In Jefferson on Display, G. S.... More


A Strife of Tongues

The Compromise of 1850 and the Ideological Foundations of the American Civil War


Stephen E. Maizlish

Near the end of a nine-month confrontation preceding the Compromise of 1850, Abraham Venable warned his fellow congressmen that "words become things." Indeed, in politics—then, as now—rhetoric makes reality. But while the legislative maneuvering, factional alignments, and specific measures of the... More


Pulpit and Nation

Clergymen and the Politics of Revolutionary America


Spencer W. McBride

In Pulpit and Nation, Spencer McBride highlights the importance of Protestant clergymen in early American political culture, elucidating the actual role of religion in the founding era. Beginning with colonial precedents for clerical involvement in politics and concluding with false rumors of... More


The Papers of James Madison
Presidential Series, vol. 9
19 February 1815-12 October 1815


James Madison. Edited by Angela Kreider, J. C. A. Stagg, Mary Parke Johnson, and Anne Mandeville Colony

[Book description not available]


Segregation's Science

Eugenics and Society in Virginia


Gregory Michael Dorr

Blending social, intellectual, legal, medical, gender, and cultural history, Segregation's Science: Eugenics and Society in Virginia examines how eugenic theory and practice bolstered Virginia's various cultures of segregation--rich from poor, sick from well, able from disabled, male from female,... More


Thomas Jefferson's Military Academy

Founding West Point


Robert M. S. McDonald

Why did Thomas Jefferson, who claimed to abhor war and fear standing armies, in 1802 establish the United States Military Academy? For more than two centuries this question has received scant attention, despite the significant contributions of both Jefferson and West Point to American history.... More


The Diaries of Gouverneur Morris

New York, 1799-1816


Gouverneur Morris. Edited by Melanie Randolph Miller

On January 5, 1799, a day that was "cold and like for Snow," Gouverneur Morris left the city of New York after dinner and then, as he recorded in his diary, went "to my House at Morrisania, where I arrive at Dusk after an Absence of above ten Years." Those ten years had been spent in the ferment of... More


The Selected Papers of John Jay

1788–1794


John Jay. edited by Elizabeth M. Nuxoll

[Book description not available]


The Eighteenth Centuries

Global Networks of Enlightenment


Edited by David T. Gies and Cynthia Wall

Today, when "globalization" is a buzzword invoked in nearly every realm, we turn back to the eighteenth century and witness the inherent globalization of its desires and, at times, its accomplishments. During the chronological eighteenth century, learning and knowledge were intimately connected... More


New Orleans, the Founding Era



Edited by Erin M. Greenwald

[Book description not available]


Trump's First Year



Michael Nelson

Donald Trump took office in January 2017 under mostly favorable conditions. He inherited neither a war nor an economic depression, and his party controlled both houses of Congress. He leveraged this successfully in some ways by delivering on his campaign promises to roll back regulations on... More


Playfair

The True Story of the British Secret Agent Who Changed How We See the World


Bruce Berkowitz

William Playfair is best known as an ingenious Scot of questionable repute who happened to invent "statistical graphics"—the line, bar, and pie charts we use today. Some are also aware he developed theories explaining international trade and investment, made contributions to concepts like price... More


Capital and Convict

Race, Region, and Punishment in Post–Civil War America


Henry Kamerling

Both in the popular imagination and in academic discourse, North and South are presented as fundamentally divergent penal systems in the aftermath of the Civil War, a difference mapped onto larger perceived cultural disparities between the two regions. The South’s post Civil War embrace of chain... More


The War Hits Home

The Civil War in Southeastern Virginia


Brian Steel Wills

In 1863 Confederate forces under Lieutenant General James Longstreet, while scouring Southside Virginia for badly needed supplies, threatened the Union garrison in Suffolk. For the residents of surrounding Nansemond, Isle of Wight, and Southampton Counties, the Suffolk campaign followed an... More


Body and Soul

A Sympathetic History of American Spiritualism


Robert S. Cox

A product of the "spiritual hothouse" of the Second Great Awakening, Spiritualism became the fastest growing religion in the nation during the 1850s, and one of the principal responses to the widespread perception that American society was descending into atomistic particularity. In Body and Soul,... More


Best Practices in Online Teaching and Learning across Academic Disciplines



Edited by Ross C. Alexander

Online teaching and learning has surged in recent years, and faculty who normally teach in face-to-face settings are increasingly called upon to teach blended, hybrid, and fully online courses. Best Practices in Online Teaching and Learning across Academic Disciplines provides insights from... More


The Papers of George Washington
Revolutionary War Series, vol. 25
10 March–12 May 1780


George Washington. Edited by William M. Ferraro

[Book description not available]


Confounding Father

Thomas Jefferson's Image in His Own Time


Robert M. S. McDonald

Of all the founding fathers, Thomas Jefferson stood out as the most controversial and confounding. Loved and hated, revered and reviled, during his lifetime he served as a lightning rod for dispute. Few major figures in American history provoked such a polarization of public opinion. One supporter... More


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