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History and Political Science


Immigration

Struggling over Borders


Edited by Sidney Milkis and David Leblang

In an increasingly polarized political environment, the first year of the new president’s term will be especially challenging. With a fresh mandate, however, the first year also offers opportunities that may never come again. The First Year Project is a fascinating initiative by the Miller Center... More


Race

The American Cauldron


Edited by Douglas A. Blackmon

In an increasingly polarized political environment, the first year of the new president’s term will be especially challenging. With a fresh mandate, however, the first year also offers opportunities that may never come again. The First Year Project is a fascinating initiative by the Miller Center... More


Trump

The First Two Years


Michael Nelson

On the first anniversary of Donald Trump’s presidency, Michael Nelson, one of our finest and most objective presidential scholars, published Trump’s First Year, a nonpartisan assessment that was widely hailed as the best account of one of the most unusual years in presidential history. At the... More


Peacebuilding through Dialogue

Education, Human Transformation, and Conflict Resolution


Edited by Peter N. Stearns

This volume examines the many dimensions of dialogue as a key driver of peaceful personal and social change. While most people agree on the value of dialogue, few delve into its meaning or consider its full range. The essays collected here consider dialogue in the context of teaching and learning,... More


The Papers of George Washington
Revolutionary War Series, vol. 26
13 May–4 July 1780


George Washington. Edited by Benjamin L. Huggins and Adrina Garbooshian-Huggins

With volume 26 of the Revolutionary War Series, Gen. George Washington and his troops transition from the more static affairs of winter encampment to active operations that would include two battles against the British. Throughout the volume, logistics and recruiting dominate Washington’s... More


Patriotism and Piety

Federalist Politics and Religious Struggle in the New American Nation


Jonathan J. Den Hartog

In Patriotism and Piety, Jonathan Den Hartog argues that the question of how religion would function in American society was decided in the decades after the Constitution and First Amendment established a legal framework. Den Hartog shows that among the wide array of politicians and public figures... More


In the Red and in the Black

Debt, Dishonor, and the Law in France between Revolutions


Erika Vause

"The most dishonorable act that can dishonor a man." Such is Félix Grandet’s unsparing view of bankruptcy, adding that even a highway robber—who at least "risks his own life in attacking you"—is worthier of respect. Indeed, the France of Balzac’s day was an unforgiving place for borrowers. Each... More


Monacan Millennium

A Collaborative Archaeology and History of a Virginia Indian People


Jeffrey L. Hantman

While Jamestown and colonial settlements dominate narratives of Virginia’s earliest days, the land’s oldest history belongs to its native people. Monacan Millennium tells the story of the Monacan Indian people of Virginia, stretching from 1000 A.D. through the moment of colonial contact in 1607 and... More


Becoming Lincoln



William W. Freehling

Shortlisted for the 2018 Lincoln PrizePrevious biographies of Abraham Lincoln—universally acknowledged as one of America’s greatest presidents—have typically focused on his experiences in the White House. In Becoming Lincoln, renowned historian William Freehling instead emphasizes the prewar years... More


Avoiding War with China

Two Nations, One World


Amitai Etzioni

Are the United States and China on a collision course? In response to remarks made by Donald Trump’s secretary of state, China’s state-run newspaper Global Times asserted, "Unless Washington plans to wage a large-scale war in the South China Sea, any other approaches to prevent Chinese access to... More


Crucible

The President's First Year


Edited by Michael Nelson, Jeffrey L. Chidester, and Stefanie Georgakis Abbott

Is the presidency a position one must learn on the job, or can one learn from others’ experience? No common thread runs through the list of forty-five presidents; no playbook provides the answers to all the challenges a president will face. Yet even in the most unprecedented situations, history can... More


Higher Calling

The Rise of Nontraditional Leaders in Academia


Scott C. Beardsley

A revolution has been taking place in the ranks of higher education. University and college presidents—once almost invariably the products of "traditional" scholarly, tenure-track career paths, up through the provost’s office—are rapidly becoming a group with diverse skills and backgrounds. The... More


What Time and Sadness Spared

Mother and Son Confront the Holocaust


Roma Nutkiewicz Ben-Atar. with Doron S. Ben-Atar

Roma Ben-Atar resisted until late in life the urging of her family to share the memories of her Nazi-era experiences. The Holocaust exerted a dark pressure on all of their lives but was never openly discussed. It was only when her granddaughter insisted on hearing the whole truth, with a directness... More


Jamestown, the Truth Revealed



William M. Kelso

What was life really like for the band of adventurers who first set foot on the banks of the James River in 1607? Important as the accomplishments of these men and women were, the written records pertaining to them are scarce, ambiguous, and often conflicting. In Jamestown, the Truth Revealed,... More


Handcuffs and Chain Link

Criminalizing the Undocumented in America


Benjamin Gonzalez O'Brien

Handcuffs and Chain Link enters the immigration debate by addressing one of its most controversial aspects: the criminalization both of extralegal immigration to the United States and of immigrants themselves in popular and political discourse. Looking at the factors that led up to criminalization... More


The Queen of America

Mary Cutts's Life of Dolley Madison


Mary Cutts. Edited by Catherine Allgor. Foreword by Cokie Roberts

For biographers and fans of Dolley Payne Todd Madison, Mary Cutts's memoir of her famous aunt has been indispensable. Because Madison left behind no account of her life, the common assumption has been that Cutts’s account is the closest we have to Madison's autobiographical voice. With this new,... More


George Washington's Barbados Diary, 1751-52



George Washington. Edited by Alicia K. Anderson and Lynn A. Price

In the autumn of 1751, at the age of nineteen, George Washington sailed with his older half-brother Lawrence from Virginia to the Caribbean island of Barbados—the one and only time that the future Revolutionary War hero and president would leave the shores of continental North America. Lawrence had... More


The Papers of Robert Treat Paine, 1778-1786



Robert Treat Paine. Edited by Edward W. Hanson

The fourth volume of this series encompasses Robert Treat Paine’s time as Massachusetts attorney general. Paine, best known as a signer of the Declaration of Independence, spent the remainder of his public career in state service. The documents in this volume highlight the quest for order in a... More


Becoming Men of Some Consequence

Youth and Military Service in the Revolutionary War


John A. Ruddiman

Young Continental soldiers carried a heavy burden in the American Revolution. Their experiences of coming of age during the upheavals of war provide a novel perspective on the Revolutionary era, eliciting questions of gender, family life, economic goals, and politics. "Going for a soldier" forced... More


Jefferson on Display

Attire, Etiquette, and the Art of Presentation


G. S. Wilson

When we think of Thomas Jefferson, a certain picture comes to mind for some of us, combining his physical appearance with our perception of his character. During Jefferson’s lifetime this image was already taking shape, helped along by his own assiduous cultivation. In Jefferson on Display, G. S.... More


Pulpit and Nation

Clergymen and the Politics of Revolutionary America


Spencer W. McBride

In Pulpit and Nation, Spencer McBride highlights the importance of Protestant clergymen in early American political culture, elucidating the actual role of religion in the founding era. Beginning with colonial precedents for clerical involvement in politics and concluding with false rumors of... More


The Papers of James Madison
Presidential Series, vol. 9
19 February 1815-12 October 1815


James Madison. Edited by Angela Kreider, J. C. A. Stagg, Mary Parke Johnson, and Anne Mandeville Colony

[Book description not available]


Segregation's Science

Eugenics and Society in Virginia


Gregory Michael Dorr

Blending social, intellectual, legal, medical, gender, and cultural history, Segregation's Science: Eugenics and Society in Virginia examines how eugenic theory and practice bolstered Virginia's various cultures of segregation--rich from poor, sick from well, able from disabled, male from female,... More


Thomas Jefferson's Military Academy

Founding West Point


Robert M. S. McDonald

Why did Thomas Jefferson, who claimed to abhor war and fear standing armies, in 1802 establish the United States Military Academy? For more than two centuries this question has received scant attention, despite the significant contributions of both Jefferson and West Point to American history.... More


The Diaries of Gouverneur Morris

New York, 1799-1816


Gouverneur Morris. Edited by Melanie Randolph Miller

On January 5, 1799, a day that was "cold and like for Snow," Gouverneur Morris left the city of New York after dinner and then, as he recorded in his diary, went "to my House at Morrisania, where I arrive at Dusk after an Absence of above ten Years." Those ten years had been spent in the ferment of... More


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