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History and Political Science


The Papers of James Madison
Presidential Series, vol. 9
19 February 1815-12 October 1815


James Madison. Edited by Angela Kreider, J. C. A. Stagg, Mary Parke Johnson, and Anne Mandeville Colony

[Book description not available]


Segregation's Science

Eugenics and Society in Virginia


Gregory Michael Dorr

Blending social, intellectual, legal, medical, gender, and cultural history, Segregation's Science: Eugenics and Society in Virginia examines how eugenic theory and practice bolstered Virginia's various cultures of segregation--rich from poor, sick from well, able from disabled, male from female,... More


Thomas Jefferson's Military Academy

Founding West Point


Robert M. S. McDonald

Why did Thomas Jefferson, who claimed to abhor war and fear standing armies, in 1802 establish the United States Military Academy? For more than two centuries this question has received scant attention, despite the significant contributions of both Jefferson and West Point to American history.... More


The Diaries of Gouverneur Morris

New York, 1799-1816


Gouverneur Morris. Edited by Melanie Randolph Miller

On January 5, 1799, a day that was "cold and like for Snow," Gouverneur Morris left the city of New York after dinner and then, as he recorded in his diary, went "to my House at Morrisania, where I arrive at Dusk after an Absence of above ten Years." Those ten years had been spent in the ferment of... More


The Selected Papers of John Jay

1788–1794


John Jay. edited by Elizabeth M. Nuxoll

[Book description not available]


New Orleans, the Founding Era



Edited by Erin M. Greenwald

[Book description not available]


Trump's First Year



Michael Nelson

Donald Trump took office in January 2017 under mostly favorable conditions. He inherited neither a war nor an economic depression, and his party controlled both houses of Congress. He leveraged this successfully in some ways by delivering on his campaign promises to roll back regulations on... More


Playfair

The True Story of the British Secret Agent Who Changed How We See the World


Bruce Berkowitz

William Playfair is best known as an ingenious Scot of questionable repute who happened to invent "statistical graphics"—the line, bar, and pie charts we use today. Some are also aware he developed theories explaining international trade and investment, made contributions to concepts like price... More


Capital and Convict

Race, Region, and Punishment in Post–Civil War America


Henry Kamerling

Both in the popular imagination and in academic discourse, North and South are presented as fundamentally divergent penal systems in the aftermath of the Civil War, a difference mapped onto larger perceived cultural disparities between the two regions. The South’s post Civil War embrace of chain... More


The War Hits Home

The Civil War in Southeastern Virginia


Brian Steel Wills

In 1863 Confederate forces under Lieutenant General James Longstreet, while scouring Southside Virginia for badly needed supplies, threatened the Union garrison in Suffolk. For the residents of surrounding Nansemond, Isle of Wight, and Southampton Counties, the Suffolk campaign followed an... More


Body and Soul

A Sympathetic History of American Spiritualism


Robert S. Cox

A product of the "spiritual hothouse" of the Second Great Awakening, Spiritualism became the fastest growing religion in the nation during the 1850s, and one of the principal responses to the widespread perception that American society was descending into atomistic particularity. In Body and Soul,... More


Best Practices in Online Teaching and Learning across Academic Disciplines



Edited by Ross C. Alexander

Online teaching and learning has surged in recent years, and faculty who normally teach in face-to-face settings are increasingly called upon to teach blended, hybrid, and fully online courses. Best Practices in Online Teaching and Learning across Academic Disciplines provides insights from... More


The Papers of George Washington
Revolutionary War Series, vol. 25
10 March–12 May 1780


George Washington. Edited by William M. Ferraro

[Book description not available]


Confounding Father

Thomas Jefferson's Image in His Own Time


Robert M. S. McDonald

Of all the founding fathers, Thomas Jefferson stood out as the most controversial and confounding. Loved and hated, revered and reviled, during his lifetime he served as a lightning rod for dispute. Few major figures in American history provoked such a polarization of public opinion. One supporter... More


The Battle for the Court

Interest Groups, Judicial Elections, and Public Policy


Lawrence Baum, David Klein, and Matthew J. Streb

Once largely ignored, judicial elections in the states have become increasingly controversial over the past two decades. Legal organizations, prominent law professors, and a retired Supreme Court justice have advocated the elimination of elections as a means to choose judges. One of their primary... More


The Making of a Racist

A Southerner Reflects on Family, History, and the Slave Trade


Charles B. Dew

In this powerful memoir, Charles Dew, one of America’s most respected historians of the South--and particularly its history of slavery--turns the focus on his own life, which began not in the halls of enlightenment but in a society unequivocally committed to segregation.Dew re-creates the... More


Face Value

The Consumer Revolution and the Colonizing of America


Cary Carson

The Industrial Revolution was previously understood as having awakened an enormous, unquenchable thirst for material consumption. People up and down the social order had discovered and were indulging in the most extraordinary passion for consumer merchandise in quantities and varieties that had... More


Experiencing Empire

Power, People, and Revolution in Early America


Patrick Griffin

Born of clashing visions of empire in England and the colonies, the American Revolution saw men and women grappling with power— and its absence—in dynamic ways. On both sides of the revolutionary divide, Americans viewed themselves as an imperial people. This perspective conditioned how they... More


Patriots, Prostitutes, and Spies

Women and the Mexican-American War


John M. Belohlavek

In Patriots, Prostitutes, and Spies, John M. Belohlavek tells the story of women on both sides of the Mexican-American War (1846-48) as they were propelled by the bloody conflict to adopt new roles and expand traditional ones.American women "back home" functioned as anti-war activists, pro-war... More


The Papers of James Madison
Secretary of State Series, vol. 11
1 January 1806-31 May 1806


James Madison, Mary A. Hackett, J. C. A. Stagg, Mary Parke Johnson, Anne Mandeville Colony, and Katharine E. Harbury

During the period covered by this volume, James Madison continued to deal with the United States' vexing relations with Europe. Mounting outrage against Great Britain's seizure of American vessels, impressment of seamen, and violations of trade agreements with British Canada erupted in Congress.... More


Jefferson's Body

A Corporeal Biography


Maurizio Valsania

What did Thomas Jefferson look like? How did he carry himself? Such questions, reasonable to ask as we look back on a person who lived in an era before photography, are the starting point for this boldly original new work. Maurizio Valsania considers all aspects of Jefferson’s complex conception of... More


The Uplift Generation

Cooperation across the Color Line in Early Twentieth-Century Virginia


Clayton McClure Brooks

Offering a fresh look at interracial cooperation in the formative years of Jim Crow, The Uplift Generation examines how segregation was molded, not by Virginia’s white political power structure alone but rather through the work of a generation of Virginian reformers across the color line who from... More


Daydreams and Nightmares

A Virginia Family Faces Secession and War


Brent Tarter

The decision of the eventual Confederate states to secede from the Union set in motion perhaps the most dramatic chapter in American history, and one that has typically been told on a grand scale. In Daydreams and Nightmares, however, historian Brent Tarter shares the story of one Virginia family... More


Lincoln's Dilemma

Blair, Sumner, and the Republican Struggle over Racism and Equality in the Civil War Era


Paul D. Escott

The Civil War forced America finally to confront the contradiction between its founding values and human slavery. At the center of this historic confrontation was Abraham Lincoln. By the time this Illinois politician had risen to the office of president, the dilemma of slavery had expanded to the... More


Satan and Salem

The Witch-Hunt Crisis of 1692


Benjamin C. Ray

The result of a perfect storm of factors that culminated in a great moral catastrophe, the Salem witch trials of 1692 took a breathtaking toll on the young English colony of Massachusetts. Over 150 people were imprisoned, and nineteen men and women, including a minister, were executed by hanging.... More


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