You are here

History and Political Science


Woodrow Wilson and the Great War

Reconsidering America's Neutrality, 1914–1917


Robert W. Tucker

In recent years, and in light of U.S. attempts to project power in the world, the presidency of Woodrow Wilson has been more commonly invoked than ever before. Yet "Wilsonianism" has often been distorted by a concentration on American involvement in the First World War. In Woodrow Wilson and the... More


Scalawag

A White Southerner's Journey through Segregation to Human Rights Activism


Edward H. Peeples, with Nancy MacLean. Afterword by James H. Hershman Jr.

Scalawag tells the surprising story of a white working-class boy who became an unlikely civil rights activist. Born in 1935 in Richmond, where he was sent to segregated churches and schools, Ed Peeples was taught the ethos and lore of white supremacy by every adult in his young life. That message... More


The Papers of James Madison
Presidential Series, vol. 8
July 1814-18 February 1815


James Madison. Edited by Angela Kreider, J. C. A. Stagg, Anne Mandeville Colony, Katharine E. Harbury, and Mary Parke Johnson

Volume 8 of the Presidential Series covers the suspense-filled final months of the War of 1812, as Madison awaited the outcome of peace negotiations at Ghent while defending the country against British invasion, warding off government bankruptcy, and preparing to meet armed resistance in New... More


Between Sovereignty and Anarchy

The Politics of Violence in the American Revolutionary Era


Edited by Patrick Griffin, Robert G. Ingram, Peter S. Onuf, and Brian Schoen

Between Sovereignty and Anarchy considers the conceptual and political problem of violence in the early modern Anglo-Atlantic, charting an innovative approach to the history of the American Revolution. Its editors and contributors contend that existing scholarship on the Revolution largely ignores... More


Dunmore's New World

The Extraordinary Life of a Royal Governor in Revolutionary America--with Jacobites, Counterfeiters, Land Schemes, Shipwrecks, Scalping, Indian Politics, Runaway Slaves, and Two Illegal Royal Weddings


James Corbett David

Dunmore's New World tells the stranger-than-fiction story of Lord Dunmore, the last royal governor of Virginia, whose long-neglected life boasts a measure of scandal and intrigue rare in the annals of the colonial world. Dunmore not only issued the first formal proclamation of emancipation in... More


Bringing Race Back In

Black Politicians, Deracialization, and Voting Behavior in the Age of Obama


Christopher T. Stout

Bringing Race Back In empirically investigates whether "post-racial" campaign strategies, which are becoming increasingly common, improve black candidates’ ability to mobilize and attract voters of all races and ethnicities. In contrast to existing studies, this analysis demonstrates that black... More


Mobilizing Opportunities

The Evolving Latino Electorate and the Future of American Politics


Ricardo Ramírez

The growth of the Latino population is the most significant demographic shift in the United States today. Yet growth alone cannot explain this population’s increasing impact on the electorate; nor can a parsing of its subethnicities. In the most significant analysis to date on the growing political... More


Intimate Reconstructions

Children in Postemancipation Virginia


Catherine A. Jones

In Intimate Reconstructions, Catherine Jones considers how children shaped, and were shaped by, Virginia’s Reconstruction. Jones argues that questions of how to define, treat, reform, or protect children were never far from the surface of public debate and private concern in post–Civil War Virginia... More


Sons of the Father

George Washington and His Protégés


Edited by Robert M. S. McDonald

Whether acting as a military officer or civilian officeholder, George Washington did not possess a reputation for glad handing, easy confidences, or even much warmth. His greatest attributes as a commander might well have been his firm command over his own emotions and the way in which he held... More


Designing Dixie

Tourism, Memory, and Urban Space in the New South


Reiko Hillyer

Although many white southerners chose to memorialize the Lost Cause in the aftermath of the Civil War, boosters, entrepreneurs, and architects in southern cities believed that economic development, rather than nostalgia, would foster reconciliation between North and South. In Designing Dixie, Reiko... More


Religious Freedom

Jefferson’s Legacy, America's Creed


John Ragosta

For over one hundred years, Thomas Jefferson and his Statute for Establishing Religious Freedom have stood at the center of our understanding of religious liberty and the First Amendment. Jefferson’s expansive vision—including his insistence that political freedom and free thought would be at risk... More


Sweet Negotiations

Sugar, Slavery, and Plantation Agriculture in Early Barbados


Russell R. Menard

Intending at first simply to do further research on the mid-seventeenth-century "sugar revolution" in Barbados, Russell Menard traveled to the island. But once there, he quickly found many discrepancies between the historical understanding of the way in which this "revolution" fueled the... More


The View from the Bench and Chambers

Examining Judicial Process and Decision Making on the U.S. Courts of Appeals


Jennifer Barnes Bowie, Donald R. Songer, and John Szmer

For most of their history, the U.S. courts of appeals have toiled in obscurity, well out of the limelight of political controversy. But as the number of appeals has increased dramatically, while the number of cases heard by the Supreme Court has remained the same, the courts of appeals have become... More


Amelioration and Empire

Progress and Slavery in the Plantation Americas


Christa Dierksheide

Christa Dierksheide argues that "enlightened" slaveowners in the British Caribbean and the American South, neither backward reactionaries nor freedom-loving hypocrites, thought of themselves as modern, cosmopolitan men with a powerful alternative vision of progress in the Atlantic world. Instead of... More


A Fine Body of Men

The Orleans Light Horse, Louisiana Cavalry, 1861–1865


Donald Peter Moriarty, II

[Book description not available]


Tom Paine's America

The Rise and Fall of Transatlantic Radicalism in the Early Republic


Seth Cotlar

Tom Paine’s America explores the vibrant, transatlantic traffic in people, ideas, and texts that profoundly shaped American political debate in the 1790s. In 1789, when the Federal Constitution was ratified, "democracy" was a controversial term that very few Americans used to describe their new... More


Letters and Photographs from the Battle Country

The World War I Memoir of Margaret Hall


Margaret Hall. Edited by Margaret R. Higonnet

In August 1918 a Massachusetts-born woman named Margaret Hall boarded a transport ship in New York City that would take her across the Atlantic to work with the American Red Cross in France, then in the devastating grips of the First World War. Working at a canteen at a railroad junction close to... More


Portrait of a Patriot

The Major Political and Legal Papers of Josiah Quincy Junior


Josiah Quincy, Jr. Edited by Daniel R. Coquillette and Neil Longley York

Successful Boston lawyer, active member of the Sons of Liberty, and noted political essayist, Josiah Quincy Junior (1744–1775) left a lasting impression on those he met--for his passion in the courtroom as well as his orations in the Old South Meeting House, and for his determination to live fully... More


The True Geography of Our Country

Jefferson’s Cartographic Vision


Joel Kovarsky

A philosopher, architect, astronomer, and polymath, Thomas Jefferson lived at a time when geography was considered the "mother of all sciences." Although he published only a single printed map, Jefferson was also regarded as a geographer, owing to his interest in and use of geographic and... More


Cosmopolitan Patriots

Americans in Paris in the Age of Revolution


Philipp Ziesche

This truly transnational history reveals the important role of Americans abroad in the Age of Revolution, as well as providing an early example of the limits of American influence on other nations. From the beginning of the French Revolution to its end at the hands of Napoleon, American... More


Collegiate Republic

Cultivating an Ideal Society in Early America


Margaret Sumner

Collegiate Republic offers a compellingly different view of the first generation of college communities founded after the American Revolution. Such histories have usually taken the form of the institutional tale, charting the growth of a single institution and the male minds within it. Focusing on... More


The Road to Black Ned's Forge

A Story of Race, Sex, and Trade on the Colonial American Frontier


Turk McCleskey

In 1752 an enslaved Pennsylvania ironworker named Ned purchased his freedom and moved to Virginia on the upper James River. Taking the name Edward Tarr, he became the first free black landowner west of the Blue Ridge. Tarr established a blacksmith shop on the Great Wagon Road from Philadelphia to... More


Crossing the Boundaries of Belief

Geographies of Religious Conversion in Southern Germany, 1648-1800


Duane J. Corpis

In early modern Germany, religious conversion was a profoundly social and political phenomenon rather than purely an act of private conscience. Because social norms and legal requirements demanded that every subject declare membership in one of the state-sanctioned Christian churches, the act of... More


Era of Experimentation

American Political Practices in the Early Republic


Daniel Peart

In Era of Experimentation, Daniel Peart challenges the pervasive assumption that the present-day political system, organized around two competing parties, represents the logical fulfillment of participatory democracy. Recent accounts of "the rise of American democracy" between the Revolution and... More


Humboldt and Jefferson

A Transatlantic Friendship of the Enlightenment


Sandra Rebok

Humboldt and Jefferson explores the relationship between two fascinating personalities: the Prussian explorer, scientist, and geographer Alexander von Humboldt (1769–1859) and the American statesman, architect, and naturalist Thomas Jefferson (1743–1826). In the wake of his famous expedition... More


Pages