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History and Political Science


Citizens of Convenience

The Imperial Origins of American Nationhood on the U.S.-Canadian Border Lawrence Hatter

Like merchant ships flying flags of convenience to navigate foreign waters, traders in the northern borderlands of the early American republic exploited loopholes in the Jay Treaty that allowed them to avoid border regulations by constantly shifting between British and American nationality. In... More


Fatal Politics

The Nixon Tapes, the Vietnam War, and the Casualties of Reelection Ken Hughes

In his widely acclaimed Chasing Shadows ("the best account yet of Nixon’s devious interference with Lyndon Johnson’s 1968 Vietnam War negotiations"-- Washington Post), Ken Hughes revealed the roots of the covert activity that culminated in Watergate. In Fatal Politics, Hughes turns to the final... More


Recollections

The French Revolution of 1848 and Its Aftermath Alexis de Tocqueville. Edited by Olivier Zunz. Translated by Arthur Goldhammer

Alexis de Tocqueville’s Souvenirs was his extraordinarily lucid and trenchant analysis of the 1848 revolution in France. Despite its bravura passages and stylistic flourishes, however, it was not intended for publication. Written just before Louis-Napoléon Bonaparte’s 1851 coup prompted the great... More


War upon Our Border

Two Ohio Valley Communities Navigate the Civil War Stephen I. Rockenbach

War upon Our Border examines the experiences of two Ohio River Valley communities during the turmoil and social upheaval of the American Civil War. Although on opposite sides of the border between slavery and freedom, Corydon, Indiana, and Frankfort, Kentucky, shared a legacy of white settlement... More


The Papers of George Washington

1 Oct. 1795–31 March 1796 George Washington

Volume 19 of the Presidential Series (October 1795 through March 1796) features the final stages of the controversy about the 1794 Treaty of Amity, Commerce, and Navigation with Great Britain (the Jay Treaty). In August, George Washington had ratified the treaty, with a condition attached by the... More


The Executioner's Journal

Meister Frantz Schmidt of the Imperial City of Nuremberg Frantz Schmidt. Translated by Joel F. Harrington

During a career lasting nearly half a century, Meister Frantz Schmidt (1554-1634) personally put to death 392 individuals and tortured, flogged, or disfigured hundreds more. The remarkable number of victims, as well as the officially sanctioned context in which they suffered at Schmidt’s hands, was... More


Settler Jamaica in the 1750s

A Social Portrait Jack P. Greene

By the mid-eighteenth century, observers of the emerging overseas British Empire thought that Jamaica—in addition to being the largest British colony in the West Indies—was the most valuable of the American colonies. Based on a unique set of historical lists and maps, along with a variety of other... More


Keep On Keeping On

The NAACP and the Implementation of Brown v. Board of Education in Virginia Brian J. Daugherity

Virginia was a battleground state in the struggle to implement Brown v. Board of Education, with one of the South’s largest and strongest NAACP units fighting against a program of noncompliance crafted by the state’s political leaders. Keep On Keeping On offers a detailed examination of how African... More


George Washington, Nationalist

Edward J. Larson

George Washington was the unanimous choice of his fellow founders for president, and he is remembered to this day as an exceptional leader, but how exactly did this manifest itself during his lifetime? In George Washington, Nationalist, acclaimed author Edward J. Larson reveals the fascinating... More


A Saga of the New South

Race, Law, and Public Debt in Virginia Brent Tarter

In the lead-up to the Civil War, Virginia, like other southern states, amassed a large public debt while striving to improve transportation infrastructure and stimulate economic development. A Saga of the New South delves into the largely untold story of the decades-long postwar controversies over... More


Gun Culture in Early Modern England

Lois G. Schwoerer

Guns had an enormous impact on the social, economic, cultural, and political lives of civilian men, women, and children of all social strata in early modern England. In this study, Lois Schwoerer identifies and analyzes England’s domestic gun culture from 1500 to 1740, uncovering how guns became... More


A Company Man

The Remarkable French-Atlantic Voyage of a Clerk for the Company of the Indies [HC] Edited by Erin M. Greenwald

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The Private Jefferson

Perspectives from the Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society Peter S. Onuf, Andrea Wulf, and Henry Adams. Edited by Ondine LeBlanc

One of U.S. history’s most eminent figures, Thomas Jefferson is as elusive as he is revered. The Private Jefferson opens a window onto the third president’s inner life by exploring the single largest cache of Thomas Jefferson’s private papers, held--to the surprise of many--at the Massachusetts... More


The Papers of James Madison

1 March 1823-24 February 1826 James Madison. Edited by David B. Mattern, J. C. A. Stagg, Mary Parke Johnson, and Katharine E. Harbury

During the period around volume 3 of the Retirement Series, James Madison remained largely at Montpelier, except for occasional visits to neighbors and attendance at ceremonial dinners and semiannual meetings of the Board of Visitors of the University of Virginia. Madison’s correspondence in this... More


A Notorious Woman

Anne Royall in Jacksonian America Elizabeth J. Clapp

During her long career as a public figure in Jacksonian America, Anne Royall was called everything from an "enemy of religion" to a "Jackson man" to a "common scold." In her search for the source of such strong reactions, Elizabeth Clapp has uncovered the story of a widely read woman of letters who... More


Treasure in Heaven

The Holy Poor in Early Christianity Peter Brown

The "holy poor" have long maintained an elite status within Christianity. Differing from the "real" poor, these clergymen, teachers, and ascetics have historically been viewed by their fellow Christians as persons who should receive material support in exchange for offering immeasurable immaterial... More


Hometown Religion

Regimes of Coexistence in Early Modern Westphalia David M. Luebke

The pluralization of Christian religion was the defining fact of cultural life in sixteenth-century Europe. Everywhere they took root, ideas of evangelical reform disturbed the unity of religious observance on which political community was founded. By the third quarter of the sixteenth century, one... More


The Papers of George Washington
Revolutionary War Series, Volume 24
1 January–9 March 1780 George Washington. Benjamin L. Huggins

With volume 24 of the Revolutionary War Series, the conflict enters a new decade. New Year's Day 1780 finds Washington in winter quarters at Morristown, N.J., having established his headquarters at the Ford mansion there one month earlier.During the weeks covered by this volume, the Continental... More


The Haitian Declaration of Independence

Creation, Context, and Legacy Edited by Julia Gaffield

While the Age of Revolution has long been associated with the French and American Revolutions, increasing attention is being paid to the Haitian Revolution as the third great event in the making of the modern world. A product of the only successful slave revolution in history, Haiti’s Declaration... More


The Selected Papers of John Jay

1785-1788 John Jay. edited by Elizabeth M. Nuxoll

Volume 4 of The Selected Papers of John Jay opens in January 1785 as John Jay assumes office as secretary for foreign affairs and brings system and order to the long-neglected Department of Foreign Affairs. It explores Jay's administration of all aspects of American foreign affairs, including his... More


The Road from Runnymede

Magna Carta and Constitutionalism in America A. E. Dick Howard

For the eight hundredth anniversary of the Magna Carta, the University of Virginia Press presents the first paperback edition of The Road from Runnymede by A. E. Dick Howard, originally published in 1968. In this volume, Howard explores the ways in which Magna Carta’s concepts, most notably due... More


Of Courtiers and Kings

More Stories of Supreme Court Law Clerks and Their Justices Edited by Todd C. Peppers and Clare Cushman

Supreme Court justices have long relied on law clerks to help process the work of the Court. Yet few outside the Court are privy to the behind-the-scenes bonds that form between justices and their clerks.In Of Courtiers and Kings, Todd C. Peppers and Clare Cushman offer an intimate new look at the... More


Enlightenment Underground

Radical Germany, 1680-1720 Martin Mulsow. Translated by H. C. Erik Midelfort

Online supplement, "Mulsow: Additions to Notes drawn from the 2002 edition of Moderne aus dem Untergrund": full versions of nearly 300 notes that were truncated in the print edition. Hosted on H. C. Erik Midelfort's website. Martin Mulsow’s seismic reinterpretation of the origins of the... More


Loyal Protestants and Dangerous Papists

Maryland and the Politics of Religion in the English Atlantic, 1630-1690 Antoinette Sutto

Loyal Protestants and Dangerous Papists analyzes the vibrant and often violent political culture of seventeenth-century America, exploring the relationship between early American and early modern British politics through a detailed study of colonial Maryland. Seventeenth-century Maryland was... More


Partners or Rivals?

Power and Latino, Black, and White Relations in the Twenty-First Century Betina Cutaia Wilkinson

The emerging demographic and political presence of Latinos in the United States has moved the discussion of race relations beyond the terms of black and white. Using a variety of theoretical approaches, Betina Cutaia Wilkinson assesses Latinos', blacks', and whites' perceptions of commonality and... More


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