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History and Political Science


Sweet Negotiations

Sugar, Slavery, and Plantation Agriculture in Early Barbados


Russell R. Menard

Intending at first simply to do further research on the mid-seventeenth-century "sugar revolution" in Barbados, Russell Menard traveled to the island. But once there, he quickly found many discrepancies between the historical understanding of the way in which this "revolution" fueled the... More


The View from the Bench and Chambers

Examining Judicial Process and Decision Making on the U.S. Courts of Appeals


Jennifer Barnes Bowie, Donald R. Songer, and John Szmer

For most of their history, the U.S. courts of appeals have toiled in obscurity, well out of the limelight of political controversy. But as the number of appeals has increased dramatically, while the number of cases heard by the Supreme Court has remained the same, the courts of appeals have become... More


Amelioration and Empire

Progress and Slavery in the Plantation Americas


Christa Dierksheide

Christa Dierksheide argues that "enlightened" slaveowners in the British Caribbean and the American South, neither backward reactionaries nor freedom-loving hypocrites, thought of themselves as modern, cosmopolitan men with a powerful alternative vision of progress in the Atlantic world. Instead of... More


A Fine Body of Men

The Orleans Light Horse, Louisiana Cavalry, 1861–1865


Donald Peter Moriarty, II

[Book description not available]


Tom Paine's America

The Rise and Fall of Transatlantic Radicalism in the Early Republic


Seth Cotlar

Tom Paine’s America explores the vibrant, transatlantic traffic in people, ideas, and texts that profoundly shaped American political debate in the 1790s. In 1789, when the Federal Constitution was ratified, "democracy" was a controversial term that very few Americans used to describe their new... More


Letters and Photographs from the Battle Country

The World War I Memoir of Margaret Hall


Margaret Hall. Edited by Margaret R. Higonnet

In August 1918 a Massachusetts-born woman named Margaret Hall boarded a transport ship in New York City that would take her across the Atlantic to work with the American Red Cross in France, then in the devastating grips of the First World War. Working at a canteen at a railroad junction close to... More


Portrait of a Patriot

The Major Political and Legal Papers of Josiah Quincy Junior


Josiah Quincy, Jr. Edited by Daniel R. Coquillette and Neil Longley York

Successful Boston lawyer, active member of the Sons of Liberty, and noted political essayist, Josiah Quincy Junior (1744–1775) left a lasting impression on those he met--for his passion in the courtroom as well as his orations in the Old South Meeting House, and for his determination to live fully... More


The True Geography of Our Country

Jefferson’s Cartographic Vision


Joel Kovarsky

A philosopher, architect, astronomer, and polymath, Thomas Jefferson lived at a time when geography was considered the "mother of all sciences." Although he published only a single printed map, Jefferson was also regarded as a geographer, owing to his interest in and use of geographic and... More


Cosmopolitan Patriots

Americans in Paris in the Age of Revolution


Philipp Ziesche

This truly transnational history reveals the important role of Americans abroad in the Age of Revolution, as well as providing an early example of the limits of American influence on other nations. From the beginning of the French Revolution to its end at the hands of Napoleon, American... More


Collegiate Republic

Cultivating an Ideal Society in Early America


Margaret Sumner

Collegiate Republic offers a compellingly different view of the first generation of college communities founded after the American Revolution. Such histories have usually taken the form of the institutional tale, charting the growth of a single institution and the male minds within it. Focusing on... More


The Road to Black Ned's Forge

A Story of Race, Sex, and Trade on the Colonial American Frontier


Turk McCleskey

In 1752 an enslaved Pennsylvania ironworker named Ned purchased his freedom and moved to Virginia on the upper James River. Taking the name Edward Tarr, he became the first free black landowner west of the Blue Ridge. Tarr established a blacksmith shop on the Great Wagon Road from Philadelphia to... More


Crossing the Boundaries of Belief

Geographies of Religious Conversion in Southern Germany, 1648-1800


Duane J. Corpis

In early modern Germany, religious conversion was a profoundly social and political phenomenon rather than purely an act of private conscience. Because social norms and legal requirements demanded that every subject declare membership in one of the state-sanctioned Christian churches, the act of... More


Era of Experimentation

American Political Practices in the Early Republic


Daniel Peart

In Era of Experimentation, Daniel Peart challenges the pervasive assumption that the present-day political system, organized around two competing parties, represents the logical fulfillment of participatory democracy. Recent accounts of "the rise of American democracy" between the Revolution and... More


Humboldt and Jefferson

A Transatlantic Friendship of the Enlightenment


Sandra Rebok

Humboldt and Jefferson explores the relationship between two fascinating personalities: the Prussian explorer, scientist, and geographer Alexander von Humboldt (1769–1859) and the American statesman, architect, and naturalist Thomas Jefferson (1743–1826). In the wake of his famous expedition... More


The Papers of James Madison
Secretary of State Series, vol. 10
1 July 1805-31 December 1805


James Madison. Edited by Mary A. Hackett, J. C. A. Stagg, Anne Mandeville Colony, Katharine E. Harbury, and Mary Parke Johnson

During the six months covered in this volume, Madison contended with the failed negotiations between Spain and the United States to settle disputed boundaries, and the failure to win French support; Great Britain's refusal to respond to U.S. complaints of the impressment of American seamen and... More


The Correspondence of Thomas Hutchinson

1740-1766


Thomas Hutchinson. Edited by John W. Tyler and Elizabeth Dubrulle

Thomas Hutchinson was the leading spokesman in colonial America for opposition to the Revolutionary movement. His logical and cogent prose as well as the stature he gained through his long and varied public service to Massachusetts gave weight to his arguments and insured a wide audience for his... More


Marching Masters

Slavery, Race, and the Confederate Army during the Civil War


Colin Edward Woodward

The Confederate army went to war to defend a nation of slaveholding states, and although men rushed to recruiting stations for many reasons, they understood that the fundamental political issue at stake in the conflict was the future of slavery. Most Confederate soldiers were not slaveholders... More


Old Fields

Photography, Glamour, and Fantasy Landscape


John R. Stilgoe

Glamour subverts convention. Models, images, and even landscapes can skew ordinary ways of seeing when viewed through the lens of photography, suggesting new worlds imbued with fantasy, mystery, sexuality, and tension.In Old Fields, John Stilgoe—one of the most original observers of his time—offers... More


Ambivalent Miracles

Evangelicals and the Politics of Racial Healing


Nancy D. Wadsworth

Over the past three decades, American evangelical Christians have undergone unexpected, progressive shifts in the area of race relations, culminating in a national movement that advocates racial integration and equality in evangelical communities. The movement, which seeks to build cross-racial... More


The Republican Party in the Age of Roosevelt

Sources of Anti-Government Conservatism in the United States


Elliot A. Rosen

Elliot Rosen's Hoover, Roosevelt, and the Brains Trust focused on the transition from the Hoover administration to that of Roosevelt and the formulation of the early New Deal program. Roosevelt, the Great Depression, and the Economics of Recovery emphasized long-term and structural recovery... More


The Great Virginia Triumvirate

George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, and James Madison in the Eyes of Their Contemporaries


John P. Kaminski

As the largest, oldest, and wealthiest of the original thirteen colonies, Virginia played a central role in the fight for independence and as a state in the new republic. This importance is reflected in the number of Virginians who filled key national leadership positions. Three remarkable... More


A Warring Nation

Honor, Race, and Humiliation in America and Abroad


Bertram Wyatt-Brown

In this culminating work of a long and distinguished career, historian Bertram Wyatt-Brown looks at the theme of honor—a subject on which he was the acknowledged expert—and places it in a broader historical and cultural context than ever before.Wyatt-Brown begins with the contention that honor... More


Dialect Diversity in America

The Politics of Language Change


William Labov

The sociolinguist William Labov has worked for decades on change in progress in American dialects and on African American Vernacular English (AAVE). In Dialect Diversity in America, Labov examines the diversity among American dialects and presents the counterintuitive finding that geographically... More


The Citizenship Revolution

Politics and the Creation of the American Union, 1774-1804


Douglas Bradburn

Most Americans believe that the ratification of the Constitution in 1788 marked the settlement of post-Revolutionary disputes over the meanings of rights, democracy, and sovereignty in the new nation. In The Citizenship Revolution, Douglas Bradburn undercuts this view by showing that the Union, not... More


Independence without Freedom

Iran's Foreign Policy


R. K. Ramazani

Ruhi Ramazani is widely considered the dean of Iranian foreign policy study, having spent the past sixty years studying and writing about the country's international relations. In Independence without Freedom, Ramazani draws together twenty of his most insightful and important articles and book... More


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