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Literary and Cultural Studies


Women Warriors in Early Modern Spain
A Tribute to Bárbara Mujica

Edited by Susan L. Fischer and Frederick A. de Armas

Although scholars often depict early modern Spanish women as victims, history and fiction of the period are filled with examples of women who defended their God-given right to make their own decisions and to define their own identities. The essays in Women Warriors in Early Modern Spain examine... More


Mourning El Dorado
Literature and Extractivism in the Contemporary American Tropics

Charlotte Rogers

What ever happened to the legend of El Dorado, the tale of the mythical city of gold lost in the Amazon jungle? Charlotte Rogers argues that El Dorado has not been forgotten and still inspires the reckless pursuit of illusory wealth. The search for gold in South America during the colonial period... More


Anecdotes of Enlightenment
Human Nature from Locke to Wordsworth

James Robert Wood

Anecdotes of Enlightenment is the first literary history of the anecdote in English. In this wide-ranging account, James Robert Wood explores the animating effects anecdotes had on intellectual and literary cultures over the long eighteenth century. Drawing on extensive archival research and... More


Public Vows
Fictions of Marriage in the English Enlightenment

Melissa J. Ganz

In eighteenth-century England, the institution of marriage became the subject of heated debates, as clerics, jurists, legislators, philosophers, and social observers began rethinking its contractual foundation. Public Vows argues that these debates shaped English fiction in crucial and previously... More


A World of Disorderly Notions
Quixote and the Logic of Exceptionalism

Aaron R. Hanlon

From Jonathan Swift to Washington Irving, those looking to propose and justify exceptions to social and political norms turned to Cervantes’s notoriously mad comic hero as a model. A World of Disorderly Notions examines the literary and political effects of Don Quixote, arguing that what makes this... More


Creole Drama
Theatre and Society in Antebellum New Orleans

Juliane Braun

The stages of antebellum New Orleans did more than entertain. In the city’s early years, French-speaking residents used the theatre to assert their political, economic, and cultural sovereignty in the face of growing Anglo-American dominance. Beyond local stages, the francophone struggle for... More


Retelling the Siege of Jerusalem in Early Modern England


Vanita Neelakanta

This compelling book explores sixteenth- and seventeenth-century English retellings of the Roman siege of Jerusalem and the way they informed and were informed by religious and political developments. The siege featured prominently in many early modern English sermons, ballads, plays, histories,... More


The Circuit of Apollo
Eighteenth-Century Women's Tributes to Women

Edited by Laura L. Runge and Jessica Cook

Written by a combination of established scholars and new critics in the field, the essays collected in Circuit of Apollo attest to the vital practice of commemorating women’s artistic and personal relationships. In doing so, they illuminate the complexity of female friendships and honor as well as... More


Novel Cultivations
Plants in British Literature of the Global Nineteenth Century

Elizabeth Hope Chang

Nineteenth-century English nature was a place of experimentation, exoticism, and transgression, as site and emblem of the global exchanges of the British Empire. Popular attitudes toward the transplantation of exotic species—botanical and human—to Victorian greenhouses and cities found anxious... More


A New Continent of Liberty
Eunomia in Native American Literature from Occom to Erdrich

Geoff Hamilton

The first book to chart autonomy’s conceptual growth in Native American literature from the late eighteenth to the early twenty-first century, A New Continent of Liberty examines, against the backdrop of Euro-American literature, how Native American authors have sought to reclaim and redefine... More


Terrible Beauty
The Violent Aesthetic and Twentieth-Century Literature

Marian Eide

If art is our bid to make sense of the senseless, there is hardly more fertile creative ground than that of the twentieth century. From the trench poetry of World War I and Holocaust memoirs by Primo Levi and Elie Wiesel to the post-colonial novels of southern Asia and the anti-apartheid plays of... More


Twice-Divided Nation
National Memory, Transatlantic News, and American Literature in the Civil War Era

Samuel Graber

The first thoroughly interdisciplinary study to examine how thetransatlantic relationship between the United States and Britain helped shape the conflicts between North and South in the decade before the American Civil War, Twice-Divided Nation addresses that influence primarily as a problem of... More


Best New Poets 2018


Edited by Kyle Dargan

"[A] reminder that contemporary poetry is not only alive and well but continuing to grow."-- Publishers Weekly"This collection stands out among the crowd claiming to represent emergent poets. Much othe editing and preliminary reading was done by emerging poets themselves, which results in an... More


Beyond 1776
Globalizing the Cultures of the American Revolution

Edited by Maria O'Malley and Denys Van Renen

In Beyond 1776, ten humanities scholars consider the American Revolution within a global framework. The foundation of the United States was deeply enmeshed with shifting alliances and multiple actors, with politics saturated by imaginative literature, and with ostensible bilateral negotiations that... More


Studies in Bibliography


Edited by David L. Vander Meulen

The sixtieth volume of Studies in Bibliography continues its tradition of presenting a wide range of articles by international scholars on bibliography, textual criticism, and other aspects of the study of books.The volume opens with an article by magisterial bibliographer G. Thomas Tanselle that... More


Women Fight, Women Write
Texts on the Algerian War

Mildred Mortimer

Today, the "fight to write"—the struggle to become the legitimate chronicler of one’s own story—is being waged and won by women across mediums and borders. But such battles of authorship extend well beyond a single cultural moment. In her gripping study of unsung female narratives of the Algerian... More


Parting Words
Victorian Poetry and Public Address

Justin A. Sider

Valedictory addresses offer a way to conceptualize the relation of self to others, private to public, ephemeral to eternal. Whether deathbed pronouncements, political capitulations, or seafaring farewells, "parting words" played a crucial role in the social imagination of Victorian writing. In this... More


Reading Contagion
The Hazards of Reading in the Age of Print

Annika Mann

Eighteenth-century British culture was transfixed by the threat of contagion, believing that everyday elements of the surrounding world could transmit deadly maladies from one body to the next. Physicians and medical writers warned of noxious matter circulating through air, bodily fluids, paper,... More


Resurrections
Authors, Heroes—and a Spy

Jeffrey Meyers

Jeffrey Meyers’ Resurrections: Authors, Heroes—and a Spy brings to life a set of extraordinary writers, painters, and literary adventurers who turned their lives into art. Meyers knew nine of these figures, in some cases intimately, while five others he admires and regrets never meeting. As he... More


Reading through the Night


Jane Tompkins

Jane Tompkins, a renowned literature professor and award-winning author, thought she knew what reading was until, struck by a debilitating illness, she finds herself reading day and night because it is all she can do. A lifelong lover of books, she realizes for the first time that if you pay close... More


Guilty Pleasures
Popular Novels and American Audiences in the Long Nineteenth Century

Hugh McIntosh

Guilty pleasures in one’s reading habits are nothing new. Late-nineteenth-century American literary culture even championed the idea that popular novels need not be great. Best-selling novels arrived in the public sphere as at once beloved and contested objects, an ambivalence that reflected and... More


Sucking Up
A Brief Consideration of Sycophancy

Deborah Parker and Mark Parker

Suck-up. Ass-kisser. Brownnoser. Bootlicker. Lickspittle. Toadeater... Found in every walk of life, both real and imagined, sycophants surround us. But whether we grumble about sycophancy or grudgingly tolerate it as a price of getting along in a complex society, we rarely examine it closely. This... More


The Physics of Possibility
Victorian Fiction, Science, and Gender

Michael Tondre

The Physics of Possibility traces the sensational birth of mathematical physics in Victorian literature, science, and statistics. As scientists took up new breakthroughs in quantification, they showed how all sorts of phenomena—the condition of stars, atoms, molecules, and nerves—could be... More


A Literary Guide to Washington, DC
Walking in the Footsteps of American Writers from Francis Scott Key to Zora Neale Hurston

Kim Roberts

The site of a thriving literary tradition, Washington, DC, has been the home to many of our nation’s most acclaimed writers. From the city’s founding to the beginnings of modernism, literary luminaries including Walt Whitman, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Alice Dunbar-Nelson, Henry Adams, Langston Hughes,... More


How Borges Wrote


Daniel Balderston

A distinguished poet and essayist and one of the finest writers of short stories in world letters, Jorge Luis Borges deliberately and regularly altered his work by extensive revision. In this volume, renowned Borges scholar Daniel Balderston undertakes to piece together Borges's creative process... More


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