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Literary and Cultural Studies


1930

The First Automobile Trip in North America, from Manhattan to Managua


Arthur Lyon. Edited by Larry Lyon, with annotations by Denis Wood and an afterword by Sally Denton

Imagine setting out on a road trip in a 1929 Ford Model A Roadster, with the stated goal of traveling from Manhattan to Mexico and Central America, after only a week’s worth of preparation. This is exactly what brothers Arthur Lyon and Joe Lyon Jr. did on March 23, 1930. The Lyons acquired some... More


Henry Adams in Washington

Linking the Personal and Public Lives of America’s Man of Letters


Ormond Seavey

A descendent of two U.S. presidents and winner of the Pulitzer Prize, Henry Adams enjoyed a very particular place in American life, not least due to his ancestry. Yet despite his prolific writing in the years between 1877 and 1891, when he lived in Washington, D.C., Adams has somehow slipped into... More


By Broad Potomac's Shore

Great Poems from the Early Days of Our Nation's Capital


Edited by Kim Roberts

Following her successful Literary Guide to Washington, DC, which Library Journal called "the perfect accompaniment for a literature-inspired vacation in the US capital," Kim Roberts returns with a comprehensive anthology of poems by both well-known and overlooked poets working and living in the... More


The Life of William Faulkner

This Alarming Paradox, 1935–1962


Carl Rollyson

By the end of volume 1 of The Life of William Faulkner ("A filling, satisfying feast for Faulk7ner aficianados"— Kirkus), the young Faulkner had gone from an unpromising, self-mythologizing bohemian to the author of some of the most innovative and enduring literature of the century, including The... More


Inventing the Critic in Renaissance England



William M. Russell

The turn of the seventeenth century was an important moment in the history of English criticism. In a series of pioneering works of rhetoric and poetics, writers such as Philip Sidney, George Puttenham, and Ben Jonson laid the foundations of critical discourse in English, and the English word "... More


We Are Kings

Political Theology and the Making of a Modern Individual


Spencer Jackson

When British and American leaders today talk of the nation—whether it is Theresa May, Barack Obama, or Donald Trump—they do so, in part, in terms established by eighteenth-century British literature. The city on a hill and the sovereign individual are tropes at the center of modern Anglo-American... More


Three Rings

A Tale of Exile, Narrative, and Fate


Daniel Mendelsohn

In this "astounding Borgesian document of clarity and brilliance" (Sebastian Barry), best-selling memoirist and critic Daniel Mendelsohn pushes against the boundaries of genre as he explores the mysterious links between the randomness of the lives we lead and the artfulness of the stories we tell.... More


Eden's Endemics

Narratives of Biodiversity on Earth and Beyond


Elizabeth Callaway

[Book description not available]


Victorians on Broadway

Literature, Adaptation, and the Modern American Musical


Sharon Aronofsky Weltman

Broadway productions of musicals such as The King and I, Oliver!, Sweeney Todd, and Jekyll and Hyde became huge theatrical hits. Remarkably, all were based on one-hundred-year-old British novels or memoirs. What could possibly explain their enormous success? Victorians on Broadway is a wide-ranging... More


Cultural Entanglements

Langston Hughes and the Rise of African and Caribbean Literature


Shane Graham

In addition to being a poet, fiction writer, playwright, and essayist, Langston Hughes was also a globe-trotting cosmopolitan, travel writer, translator, avid international networker, and—perhaps above all—pan-Africanist. In Cultural Entanglements, Shane Graham examines Hughes’s associations with a... More


Empire of Diamonds

Victorian Gems in Imperial Settings


Adrienne Munich

In 1850, the legendary Koh-i-noor diamond, gem of Eastern potentates, was transferred from the Punjab in India and, in an elaborate ceremony, placed into Queen Victoria’s outstretched hands. This act inaugurated what author Adrienne Munich recognizes in her engaging new book as the empire of... More


Reading through the Night



Jane Tompkins

Jane Tompkins, a renowned literature professor and award-winning author, thought she knew what reading was until, struck by a debilitating illness, she finds herself reading day and night because it is all she can do. A lifelong lover of books, she realizes for the first time that if you pay close... More


The Shortest Way with Defoe

Robinson Crusoe, Deism, and the Novel


Michael B. Prince

A scholarly and imaginative reconstruction of the voyage Daniel Defoe took from the pillory to literary immortality, The Shortest Way with Defoe contends that Robinson Crusoe contains a secret satire, written against one person, that has gone undetected for 300 years. By locating Defoe's nemesis... More


Afro-Creole Poetry in French from Louisiana's Radical Civil War-Era Newspapers

A Bilingual Edition


Edited by Clint Bruce

Collected here for the first time, seventy-nine poems published in the Civil War–era Afro-Creole New Orleans newspapers L’Union and La Tribune—most unavailable anywhere but in archives—bring to life a close-knit, politically progressive French-speaking community of artists and intellectuals whose... More


Hostile Humor in Renaissance France



Bruce Hayes

In sixteenth-century France, the level of jokes, irony, and ridicule found in pamphlets and plays became aggressively hostile. In Hostile Humor in Renaissance France, Bruce Hayes investigates this period leading up to the French Wars of Religion, when a deliberately harmful and destructive form of... More


Love and Depth in the American Novel

From Stowe to James


Ashley C. Barnes

Love and Depth in the American Novel seeks to change how we think about the American love story and how we imagine the love of literature. By examining classics of nineteenth-century American literature, Ashley Barnes offers a new approach to literary theory that encompasses both New Historicism... More


Milton among Spaniards



Angelica Duran

Firmly grounded in literary studies but drawing on religious studies, translation studies, drama, and visual art, Milton among Spaniards is the first book-length exploration of the afterlife of John Milton in Spanish culture, illuminating underexamined Anglo-Hispanic cultural relations. This study... More


Falling Short

The Bildungsroman and the Crisis of Self-Fashioning


Aleksandar Stević

A paradox haunts the bildungsroman: few protagonists successfully complete the process of maturation and socialization that ostensibly defines the form. From the despondent endings of Dickens’s Great Expectations and Meredith’s The Ordeal of Richard Feverel to the suicide of Balzac’s Lucien de... More


Bad Men

Creative Touchstones of Black Writers


Howard Rambsy II

How have African American writers drawn on "bad" black men and black boys as creative touchstones for their evocative and vibrant art? This is the question posed by Howard Rambsy’s new book, which explores bad men as a central, recurring, and understudied figure in African American literature, and... More


After Print

Eighteenth-Century Manuscript Cultures


Edited by Rachael Scarborough King

The eighteenth century has generally been understood as the Age of Print, when the new medium revolutionized the literary world and rendered manuscript culture obsolete. After Print, however, reveals that the story isn’t so simple. Manuscript remained a vital, effective, and even preferred forum... More


Neoliberal Nonfictions

The Documentary Aesthetic from Joan Didion to Jay-Z


Daniel Worden

With the ascendancy of neoliberalism in American culture beginning in the 1960s, the political structures governing private lives became more opaque and obscure. Neoliberal Nonfictions argues that a new style of documentary art emerged to articulate the fissures between individual experience and... More


The Sketch, the Tale, and the Beginnings of American Literature



Lydia G. Fash

Accounts of the rise of American literature often start in the 1850s with a cluster of "great American novels"—Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter, Melville’s Moby-Dick and Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin. But these great works did not spring fully formed from the heads of their creators. All three relied on... More


The Life of William Faulkner

The Past Is Never Dead, 1897-1934


Carl Rollyson

William Faulkner emerged from the ravaged South—half backwoods, half defeated empire—transforming his corner of Mississippi into the fictional Yoknapatawpha County and bestowing on the world some of the most revolutionary and enduring literature of the twentieth century. The personal story behind... More


Art and Artifact in Austen



Edited by Anna Battigelli

Jane Austen distinguished herself with genius in literature, but she was immersed in all of the arts. Austen loved dancing, played the piano proficiently, meticulously transcribed piano scores, attended concerts and art exhibits, read broadly, wrote poems, sat for portraits by her sister Cassandra... More


Dandyism

Forming Fiction from Modernism to the Present


Len Gutkin

The "dandy," a nineteenth-century character and concept exemplified in such works as Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray, reverberates in surprising corners of twentieth- and twenty-first-century culture. Establishing this character as a kind of shorthand for a diverse range of traits and tendencies... More


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