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Literary and Cultural Studies


Staging Civilization
A Transnational History of French Theater in Eighteenth-Century Europe Rahul Markovits. Translated by Jane Marie Todd. Preface by David A. Bell

Eighteenth-century France is understood to have been the dominant cultural power on that era’s international scene. Considering the emblematic case of the theater, Rahul Markovits goes beyond the idea of "French Europe" to offer a serious consideration of the intentions and goals of those involved... More


Elizabeth Fox-Genovese
Paternalism's Daughter Deborah A. Symonds

A celebrated historian and women’s studies scholar, Elizabeth Fox-Genovese roiled both disciplines with her transition from Marxist-inclined feminist to conservative public intellectual. In the first major biography of this singular and controversial scholar, Deborah Symonds explores Fox-Genovese’s... More


The Usufructuary Ethos
Power, Politics, and Environment in the Long Eighteenth Century Erin Drew

Who has the right to decide how nature is used, and in what ways? Recovering an overlooked thread of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century environmental thought, Erin Drew shows that English writers of the period commonly believed that human beings had only the "usufruct" of the earth—the "right of... More


Speculative Enterprise
Public Theaters and Financial Markets in London, 1688–1763 Mattie Burkert

In the wake of the 1688 revolution, England’s transition to financial capitalism accelerated dramatically. Londoners witnessed the rise of credit-based currencies, securities markets, speculative bubbles, insurance schemes, and lotteries. Many understood these phenomena in terms shaped by their... More


Fellow Travelers
How Road Stories Shaped the Idea of the Americas John Ochoa

Road trips loom large in the American imagination, and stories from the road have been central to crafting national identities across North and South America. Tales of traversing this vast geography, with its singular landscape, have helped foster a sense of American exceptionalism. Examining three... More


In the Arena
A Memoir of Love, War, and Politics Chuck Robb. Foreword by Bill Clinton

In December 1967, Chuck Robb was catapulted onto the national scene when he married Lynda Bird Johnson, the daughter of President Lyndon B. Johnson, in a nationally broadcast White House wedding. Shortly thereafter, Robb, a U.S. Marine, deployed to Vietnam, where he commanded India Company of the... More


Fashioning Character
Style, Performance, and Identity in Contemporary American Literature Lauren S. Cardon

It’s often said that we are what we wear. Tracing an American trajectory in fashion, Lauren Cardon shows how we become what we wear. Over the twentieth century, the American fashion industry diverged from its roots in Paris, expanding and attempting to reach as many consumers as possible. Fashion... More


Mind over Matter
Memory Fiction from Daniel Defoe to Jane Austen Sarah Eron

How do we understand memory in the early novel? Departing from traditional empiricist conceptualizations of remembering, Mind over Matter uncovers a social model of memory in Enlightenment fiction that is fluid and evolving—one that has the capacity to alter personal histories. Memories are not... More


Wandering Memory
Jan J. Dominique. Translated by Emma Donovan Page

The daughter of Haitian journalist and pro-democracy activist Jean Léopold Dominique, who was assassinated in 2000, Jan J. Dominique offers a memoir that provides a uniquely personal perspective on the tumultuous end of the twentieth century in Haiti. Wandering Memory is her elegy for a father and... More


Saul Steinberg's Literary Journeys
Nabokov, Joyce, and Others Jessica R. Feldman

Saul Steinberg’s inimitable drawings, paintings, and assemblages enriched the New Yorker, gallery and museum shows, and his own books for more than half a century. Although the literary qualities of Steinberg’s work have often been noted in passing, critics and art historians have yet to fathom the... More


Sapphic Crossings
Cross-Dressing Women in Eighteenth-Century British Literature Ula Lukszo Klein

Across the eighteenth century in Britain, readers, writers, and theater-goers were fascinated by women who dressed in men’s clothing—from actresses on stage who showed their shapely legs to advantage in men’s breeches to stories of valiant female soldiers and ruthless female pirates. Spanning... More


Reading Reality
Nineteenth-Century American Experiments in the Real E. Thomas Finan

In the early 1800s, American critics warned about the danger of literature as a distraction from reality. Later critical accounts held that American literature during the antebellum period was idealistic and that literature grew more realistic after the horrors of the Civil War. By focusing on... More


The Complete Pamphlets of Lewis Carroll
A Miscellany of Works on Alice, Theatre, Religion, Science, and More Lewis Carroll

The final volume in the Pamphlets of Lewis Carroll series collects more than one hundred of his works on the Alice books, the theater, religion and morality, science and mathematics, photography, letters and postage, humor, stories, poetry, undergraduate papers, circular letters, and miscellaneous... More


Interest and Connection in the Eighteenth Century
Hervey, Johnson, Smith, Equiano Jacob Sider Jost

Can a single word explain the world? In the British eighteenth century, interest comes close: it lies at the foundation of the period’s thinking about finance, economics, politics, psychology, and aesthetics. Interest and Connection in the Eighteenth Century provides the first comprehensive account... More


Best New Poets 2020
50 Poems from Emerging Writers Edited by Brian Teare

Praise for earlier editions:"[A] reminder that contemporary poetry is not only alive and well but continuing to grow."—Publishers Weekly"This collection stands out among the crowd claiming to represent emergent poets. Much of the editing and preliminary reading was done by emerging poets themselves... More


Henry Adams in Washington
Linking the Personal and Public Lives of America’s Man of Letters Ormond Seavey

A descendent of two U.S. presidents and winner of the Pulitzer Prize, Henry Adams enjoyed a very particular place in American life, not least due to his ancestry. Yet despite his prolific writing in the years between 1877 and 1891, when he lived in Washington, D.C., Adams has somehow slipped into... More


By Broad Potomac's Shore
Great Poems from the Early Days of Our Nation's Capital Edited by Kim Roberts

Following her successful Literary Guide to Washington, DC, which Library Journal called "the perfect accompaniment for a literature-inspired vacation in the US capital," Kim Roberts returns with a comprehensive anthology of poems by both well-known and overlooked poets working and living in the... More


We Are Kings
Political Theology and the Making of a Modern Individual Spencer Jackson

When British and American leaders today talk of the nation—whether it is Boris Johnson, Barack Obama, or Donald Trump—they do so, in part, in terms established by eighteenth-century British literature. The city on a hill and the sovereign individual are tropes at the center of modern Anglo-American... More


The Life of William Faulkner
This Alarming Paradox, 1935–1962 Carl Rollyson

By the end of volume 1 of The Life of William Faulkner ("A filling, satisfying feast for Faulkner aficianados"— Kirkus), the young Faulkner had gone from an unpromising, self-mythologizing bohemian to the author of some of the most innovative and enduring literature of the century, including The... More


Nervous Fictions
Literary Form and the Enlightenment Origins of Neuroscience Jess Keiser

"The brain contains ten thousand cells," wrote the poet Matthew Prior in 1718, "in each some active fancy dwells." In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, just as scientists began to better understand the workings of the nerves, the nervous system became the site for a series of elaborate... More


Three Rings
A Tale of Exile, Narrative, and Fate Daniel Mendelsohn

In this genre-defying book, best-selling memoirist and critic Daniel Mendelsohn explores the mysterious links between the randomness of the lives we lead and the artfulness of the stories we tell.Combining memoir, biography, history, and literary criticism, Three Rings weaves together the stories... More


1930
The First Automobile Trip in North America, from Manhattan to Managua Arthur Lyon. Edited by Larry Lyon, with annotations by Denis Wood and an afterword by Sally Denton

Imagine setting out on a road trip in a 1929 Ford Model A Roadster, with the stated goal of traveling from Manhattan to Mexico and Central America, after only a week’s worth of preparation. This is exactly what brothers Arthur Lyon and Joe Lyon Jr. did on March 23, 1930. The Lyons acquired some... More


Eden's Endemics
Narratives of Biodiversity on Earth and Beyond Elizabeth Callaway

In the past thirty years biodiversity has become one of the central organizing principles through which we understand the nonhuman environment. Its deceptively simple definition as the variation among living organisms masks its status as a hotly contested term both within the sciences and more... More


Victorians on Broadway
Literature, Adaptation, and the Modern American Musical Sharon Aronofsky Weltman

Broadway productions of musicals such as The King and I, Oliver!, Sweeney Todd, and Jekyll and Hyde became huge theatrical hits. Remarkably, all were based on one-hundred-year-old British novels or memoirs. What could possibly explain their enormous success? Victorians on Broadway is a wide-ranging... More


Empire of Diamonds
Victorian Gems in Imperial Settings Adrienne Munich

In 1850, the legendary Koh-i-noor diamond, gem of Eastern potentates, was transferred from the Punjab in India and, in an elaborate ceremony, placed into Queen Victoria’s outstretched hands. This act inaugurated what author Adrienne Munich recognizes in her engaging new book as the empire of... More


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