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Literary and Cultural Studies


Studies in Bibliography
Papers of the Bibliographical Society of the University of Virginia Edited by David L. Vander Meulen

[Book description not available]


The Letters of Christina Rossetti
1887-1894 Christina Rossetti. Edited by Antony H. Harrison

Christina Rossetti (1830–1894) has come to be considered one of the major poets--not just one of the major women poets—of the Victorian era, eclipsing her famous brother. Leading critics have demonstrated how studies of Rossetti’s work, her daily life, her relationships with the Pre-Raphaelites,... More


The Woman Within
Ellen Glasgow and Pamela R. Matthews

[Book description not available]


Character and Conversion in Autobiography
Augustine, Montaigne, Descartes, Rousseau, and Sartre Patrick Riley

What happens, asks Patrick Riley, when a life transformed becomes an autobiography? What is the relationship between the subjective upheaval of conversion and the representation of character? Who, then, is this "self" writing the narrative of a life? Thinking of conversion as a radical turning... More


The Correspondence of William James
April 1908-August 1910 William James. Edited by Ignas K. Skrupskelis and Elizabeth M. Berkeley

This twelfth and final volume of The Correspondence of William James concludes the series of William James’s correspondence with family, friends, and colleagues that began with volume 4. The first three volumes were devoted to the letters exchanged between the brothers William and Henry James.... More


Acting Naturally
Victorian Theatricality and Authenticity Lynn M. Voskuil

In Acting Naturally Lynn Voskuil argues that Victorian Britons saw themselves as "authentically performative," a paradoxical belief that focused their sense of vocation as individuals, as a public, and as a nation. Rather than confirming the customary view of Victorian England as fundamentally... More


A Passionate Usefulness
The Life and Literary Labors of Hannah Adams Gary D. Schmidt

In a literary environment dominated by men, the first American to earn a living as a writer and to establish a reputation on both sides of the Atlantic was, miraculously, a woman. Hannah Adams dared to enter—and in some ways was forced to enter—a sphere of literature that had, in eighteenth-century... More


Frances Power Cobbe
Victorian Feminist, Journalist, Reformer Sally Mitchell

Frances Power Cobbe (1822–1904) is the most important nineteenth-century British writer and activist not heretofore treated in a full-length biography. An independent professional woman, she worked to improve conditions for delinquent girls and for the sick poor, promoted university degrees for... More


Beloved Boy
Letters to Hendrik C. Andersen, 1899–1915 Henry James. Edited by Rosella Mamoli Zorzi

Already the subject of articles in the International Herald Tribune and the London Times, Beloved Boy is a remarkable collection of letters tracing Henry James’s fascination with and enduring devotion to a young Norwegian-American artist. James was already fifty-six when, visiting Rome in 1899, he... More


Rhetorical Investigations
Studies in Ordinary Language Criticism Walter Jost

In Rhetorical Investigations Walter Jost juxtaposes problems and questions in philosophy and literature, using rhetoric as the middle term and common ground between them. Drawing on the work of Ludwig Wittgenstein and Stanley Cavell, among others, Jost joins a small band of contemporary literary... More


Emily Davies
Collected Letters, 1861-1875 Emily Davies. Edited by Ann B. Murphy and Deirdre Raftery

Sarah Emily Davies (1830–1921) lived and crusaded during a time of profound change for education and women’s rights in England. At the time of her birth, women’s suffrage was scarcely open to discussion, and not one of England’s universities (there were four) admitted women. By the time of her... More


The Romance of Authenticity
The Cultural Politics of Regional and Ethnic Literatures Jeff Karem

To what extent has the growing popular demand for a vicarious experience of other cultures fueled the expectation that the most important task for regional and ethnic writers is to capture and convey authentic cultural material to their readers? In The Romance of Authenticity, Jeff Karem argues... More


Furious Flower
African-American Poetry from the Black Arts Movement to the Present Joanne V. Gabbin, ed.

Furious Flower: African-American Poetry from the Black Arts Movement to the PresentEdited by Joanne V. GabbinThe Furious Flower Conference of 1994 represented the largest gathering of African American writers at one event in nearly thirty years. In that crucial span of time, African American poetry... More


Studies in Bibliography
Papers of the Bibliographical Society of the University of Virginia David L. Vander Meulen, ed.

[Book description not available]


Manufacturing Culture
Vindications of Early Victorian Industry Joseph Bizup

From Robert Southey to William Morris, British social critics in the Romantic tradition consistently stigmatized industry as a threat to aesthetic or humanistic "culture." Joseph Bizup argues that early Victorian advocates of industry sought to resist the power inherent in this opposition by... More


Journal of a Residence in Chile during the Year 1822, and a Voyage from Chile to Brazil
Edited by Jennifer Poole Hayward.

In 1821, Maria Dundas Graham sailed for South America on H.M.S. Doris, a ship sent to protect British mercantile interests in that volatile region. After her husband, the ship’s captain Thomas Graham, died en route, the newly widowed Maria Graham landed in Valparaíso, Chile. Resisting all efforts... More


Social Stories
The Magazine Novel in Nineteenth-Century America Patricia Okker

Largely ignored in American literary history, the magazine novel was extremely popular throughout the nineteenth century, with editors describing the form as a virtual "necessity" for magazines. Unlike many previous studies of periodicals that focus often exclusively on elite literary magazines,... More


Common Wealth
Contemporary Poets of Virginia Sarah Kennedy and R. T. Smith, eds.

In Common Wealth Sarah Kennedy and R. T. Smith mine the deep vein of Virginia poetry to present a comprehensive collection of contemporary works that reflects the vibrant community of poets working today. Notable for its ethnic diversity, Common Wealth showcases the work of fifty-three poets—all of... More


Common Wealth
Contemporary Poets of Virginia Sarah Kennedy and R. T. Smith

In Common Wealth Sarah Kennedy and R. T. Smith mine the deep vein of Virginia poetry to present a comprehensive collection of contemporary works that reflects the vibrant community of poets working today. Notable for its ethnic diversity, Common Wealth showcases the work of fifty-three poets—all of... More


The Serious Pleasures of Suspense
Victorian Realism and Narrative Doubt Caroline Levine

Scholars have long recognized that narrative suspense dominates the formal dynamics of nineteenth-century British fiction, both high and low. But few have asked why suspense played such a crucial role in the Victorian novel—and in Victorian culture more broadly. The Serious Pleasures of Suspense... More


Violent Adventure
Contemporary Fiction by American Men Marilyn C. Wesley

As the mother of young sons, Marilyn Wesley became increasingly concerned about the conflicting messages they received in a world where "Han Solo replaced John Wayne as a national hero and the lost war in Vietnam was mediated by GI Joe dolls and Rambo movies." What, she wondered, do the stories we... More


The Correspondence of William James
William and Henry April 1905 - March 1908 William James. Edited by Ignas K. Skrupskelis and Elizabeth M. Berkeley

This eleventh volume of a projected twelve continues the series of William James’s correspondence with family, friends, and colleagues that began with volume 4. Consisting of some 500 letters, with an additional 650 letters calendared, volume 11 gives a complete accounting of James’s known... More


Victorian Poetry As Cultural Critique
The Politics of Performative Language E. Warwick Slinn

In recent cultural studies, poetry has become something of a neglected genre. Warwick Slinn seeks to reverse that trend and argues that a fundamental continuity between the meaning of a poetic trope and the social function of language can be established through speech act theory—specifically... More


The Swifts
Printers in the Age of Typesetting Races Walker Rumble

On a December day in 1885, Bill Barnes, a journeyman from the New York World, and Joe McCann, representing the New York Herald, faced off in a match race of Swifts, compositors who set type by hand, individually, letter by letter, with incredible accuracy and speed. McCann got off to a slow start,... More


Turning To Earth
Stories of Ecological Conversion F. Marina Schauffler

Turning to Earth offers a window into the heart of environmental change, moving beyond the culture’s traditional reliance on policy reforms and technological measures. It charts the course of "ecological conversion," a dynamic inner process by which people come to ally themselves with the natural... More


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