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Literary and Cultural Studies


Evangelical Gothic
The English Novel and the Religious War on Virtue from Wesley to Dracula Christopher Herbert

Evangelical Gothic explores the bitter antagonism that prevailed between two defining institutions of nineteenth-century Britain: Evangelicalism and the popular novel. Christopher Herbert begins by retrieving from near oblivion a rich anti-Evangelical polemical literature in which the great... More


The Hedgehog Review Reader
Two Decades of Critical Reflections on Contemporary Culture Edited by Jay Tolson. Preface by James Davison Hunter

For twenty years, The Hedgehog Review has offered critical reflections on contemporary cuture: how we shape it, how it shapes us. Published three times a year by the Institute for Advanced Studies in Culture, the journal draws on the best scholarship and thought from the humanities and social... More


Children of the Raven and the Whale
Visions and Revisions in American Literature Caroline Chamberlin Hellman

Taking its cue from Perry Miller’s 1956 classic of American literary criticism, The Raven and the Whale: The War of Words and Wits in the Era of Poe and Melville, Caroline Chamberlin Hellman’s new book examines ways in which contemporary multi-ethnic writers of the United States have responded to... More


Reading with the Senses in Victorian Literature and Science
David Sweeney Coombs

The nineteenth-century sciences cleaved sensory experience into two separate realms: the bodily physics of sensation and the mental activity of perception. This division into two discrete categories was foundational to Victorian physics, physiology, and experimental psychology. As David Sweeney... More


Sifilografía
A History of the Writerly Pox in the Eighteenth-Century Hispanic World Juan Carlos González Espitia

Syphilis was a prevalent affliction in the era of the Americas’ colonization, creating widespread anxiety that is indicated in the period’s literature across numerous fields. Reflecting Spaniards’ political prejudices of the period, it was alternately labeled "mal francés" or "el mal de las Indias... More


The Problem of Profit
Finance and Feeling in Eighteenth-Century British Literature Michael Genovese

Attacks against the pursuit of profit in eighteenth-century Britain have been largely read as reactions against market activity in general or as critiques of financial innovation.  In  The Problem of Profit, however, Michael Genovese contends that such rejections of profit derive not from a... More


The Alchemy of Conquest
Science, Religion, and the Secrets of the New World Ralph Bauer

The Age of the Discovery of the Americas was concurrent with the Age of Discovery in science. In The Alchemy of Conquest, Ralph Bauer explores the historical relationship between the two, focusing on the connections between religion and science in the Spanish, English, and French literatures about... More


Goodness and the Literary Imagination
Harvard's 95th Ingersoll Lecture with Essays on Morrison's Moral and Religious Vision Toni Morrison. Edited by David Carrasco, Stephanie Paulsell, and Mara Willard

What exactly is goodness? Where is it found in the literary imagination? Toni Morrison, one of American letters’ greatest voices, pondered these perplexing questions in her celebrated Ingersoll Lecture, delivered at Harvard University in 2012 and published now for the first time in book form.... More


Transfusion
Blood and Sympathy in the Nineteenth-Century Literary Imagination Ann Louise Kibbie

"England may with justice claim to be the native land of transfusion," wrote one European physician in 1877, acknowledging Great Britain’s crucial role in developing and promoting human-to-human transfusion as treatment for life-threatening blood loss. As news of this revolutionary medical... More


The Field of Imagination
Thomas Paine and Eighteenth-Century Poetry Scott M. Cleary

One of America’s Founding Fathers, Thomas Paine is best remembered as the pamphleteer who inspired the American Revolution. Yet few also know him as an eighteenth-century poet of considerable repute. In The Field of Imagination, Scott Cleary offers the first book on Paine’s poetry, exploring how... More


Without the Novel
Romance and the History of Prose Fiction Scott Black

No genre manifests the pleasure of reading—and its power to consume and enchant—more than romance. In suspending the category of the novel to rethink the way prose fiction works,  Without the Novel demonstrates what literary history looks like from the perspective of such readerly excesses and... More


Anecdotes of Enlightenment
Human Nature from Locke to Wordsworth James Robert Wood

Anecdotes of Enlightenment is the first literary history of the anecdote in English. In this wide-ranging account, James Robert Wood explores the animating effects anecdotes had on intellectual and literary cultures over the long eighteenth century. Drawing on extensive archival research and... More


Black Cosmopolitans
Race, Religion, and Republicanism in an Age of Revolution Christine Levecq

Black Cosmopolitans examines the lives and thought of three extraordinary black men—Jacobus Capitein, Jean-Baptiste Belley, and John Marrant—who traveled extensively throughout the eighteenth-century Atlantic world. Unlike millions of uprooted Africans and their descendants at the time, these men... More


Colonial Wounds/Postcolonial Repair
Amina Menia, Maureen Shanahan, and Beth Hinderliter

This companion volume to the Colonial Wounds/Postcolonial Repair exhibition at James Madison University’s Duke Hall Gallery of Fine Art contributes to debates about monuments, historical amnesia, and memories of war and colonialism. It includes essays by co-curators Maureen G. Shanahan and Beth... More


Character and Mourning
Woolf, Faulkner, and the Novel Elegy of the First World War Erin Penner

In response to the devastating trauma of World War I, British and American authors wrote about grief. The need to articulate loss inspired moving novels by Virginia Woolf and William Faulkner. Woolf criticized the role of Britain in the "war to end all wars," and Faulkner recognized in postwar... More


Public Vows
Fictions of Marriage in the English Enlightenment Melissa J. Ganz

In eighteenth-century England, the institution of marriage became the subject of heated debates, as clerics, jurists, legislators, philosophers, and social observers began rethinking its contractual foundation. Public Vows argues that these debates shaped English fiction in crucial and previously... More


Mourning El Dorado
Literature and Extractivism in the Contemporary American Tropics Charlotte Rogers

What ever happened to the legend of El Dorado, the tale of the mythical city of gold lost in the Amazon jungle? Charlotte Rogers argues that El Dorado has not been forgotten and still inspires the reckless pursuit of illusory wealth. The search for gold in South America during the colonial period... More


A World of Disorderly Notions
Quixote and the Logic of Exceptionalism Aaron R. Hanlon

Shortlisted for the Kenshur Prize for Best Book in Eighteenth-Century Studies from the Indiana University Center for Eighteenth-Century StudiesFrom Jonathan Swift to Washington Irving, those looking to propose and justify exceptions to social and political norms turned to Cervantes’s notoriously... More


Studies in Bibliography, Volume 60
Edited by David L. Vander Meulen

The sixtieth volume of Studies in Bibliography continues its tradition of presenting a wide range of articles by international scholars on bibliography, textual criticism, and other aspects of the study of books.The volume opens with an article by magisterial bibliographer G. Thomas Tanselle that... More


Creole Drama
Theatre and Society in Antebellum New Orleans Juliane Braun

The stages of antebellum New Orleans did more than entertain. In the city’s early years, French-speaking residents used the theatre to assert their political, economic, and cultural sovereignty in the face of growing Anglo-American dominance. Beyond local stages, the francophone struggle for... More


A New Continent of Liberty
Eunomia in Native American Literature from Occom to Erdrich Geoff Hamilton

Beginning with the writings of Samson Occom, and extending through a range of fiction and nonfiction works by William Apess, Sarah Winnemucca, Zitkala-Ša, N. Scott Momaday, Gerald Vizenor, and Louise Erdrich, Geoff Hamilton sketches a movement of gradual but resolute ascent in Native American... More


Novel Cultivations
Plants in British Literature of the Global Nineteenth Century Elizabeth Hope Chang

Shortlisted for the Best Book Prize from the British Society of Literature and ScienceNineteenth-century English nature was a place of experimentation, exoticism, and transgression, as site and emblem of the global exchanges of the British Empire. Popular attitudes toward the transplantation of... More


Terrible Beauty
The Violent Aesthetic and Twentieth-Century Literature Marian Eide

If art is our bid to make sense of the senseless, there is hardly more fertile creative ground than that of the twentieth century. From the trench poetry of World War I and Holocaust memoirs by Primo Levi and Elie Wiesel to the post-colonial novels of southern Asia and the anti-apartheid plays of... More


Best New Poets 2018
50 Poems from Emerging Writers Edited by Kyle Dargan

"[A] reminder that contemporary poetry is not only alive and well but continuing to grow."-- Publishers Weekly"This collection stands out among the crowd claiming to represent emergent poets. Much of the editing and preliminary reading was done by emerging poets themselves, which results in an... More


Twice-Divided Nation
National Memory, Transatlantic News, and American Literature in the Civil War Era Samuel Graber

The first thoroughly interdisciplinary study to examine how the transatlantic relationship between the United States and Britain helped shape the conflicts between North and South in the decade before the American Civil War, Twice-Divided Nation addresses that influence primarily as a problem of... More


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