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Literary and Cultural Studies


Pirating Fictions

Ownership and Creativity in Nineteenth-Century Popular Culture


Monica F. Cohen

Two distinctly different meanings of piracy are ingeniously intertwined in Monica Cohen's lively new book, which shows how popular depictions of the pirate held sway on the page and the stage even as their creators were preoccupied with the ravages of literary appropriation. The golden age of... More


Willful Submission

Sado-Erotics and Heavenly Marriage in Victorian Religious Poetry


Amanda Paxton

Victorian England: a Jesuit priest writes of wrestling with God at night, limbs entangled; an Anglican sister begs Jesus, her divine lover, to end her aching anticipation of their union; a clergyman exhorts nuns to study the example of medieval women who suffered on the rack in order to become "... More


Imitation Nation

Red, White, and Blackface in Early and Antebellum US Literature


Jason Richards

How did early Americans define themselves? The American exceptionalist perspective tells us that the young republic rejected Europeans, Native Americans, and African Americans in order to isolate a national culture and a white national identity. Imitativeness at this time was often seen as... More


The Pragmatist Turn

Religion, the Enlightenment, and the Formation of American Literature


Giles Gunn

In The Pragmatist Turn, renowned scholar of American literature and thought Giles Gunn offers a new critical history of the way seventeenth-century religion and the eighteenth-century Enlightenment influenced the formation of subsequent American writing. This shaping was dependent on their... More


The Illiberal Imagination

Class and the Rise of the U.S. Novel


Joe Shapiro

The Illiberal Imagination offers a synthetic, historical formalist account of how—and to what end—U.S. novels from the late eighteenth century to the mid-1850s represented economic inequality and radical forms of economic egalitarianism in the new nation. In conversation with intellectual, social... More


Genre Theory and Historical Change

Theoretical Essays of Ralph Cohen


John Rowlett

Ralph Cohen was highly regarded as the visionary founding editor of New Literary History, but his own theoretical essays appeared in such a scattering of publications that their conceptual originality, underlying coherence, and range of application have not been readily apparent. This new selection... More


East-West Exchange and Late Modernism

Williams, Moore, Pound


Zhaoming Qian

In East-West Exchange and Late Modernism, Zhaoming Qian examines the nature and extent of Asian influence on some of the literary masterpieces of Western late modernism. Focusing on the poets William Carlos Williams, Marianne Moore, and Ezra Pound, Qian relates captivating stories about their... More


The Word on the Streets

The American Language of Vernacular Modernism


Brooks E. Hefner

From the hard-boiled detective stories of Dashiell Hammett to the novels of Claude McKay, The Word on the Streets examines a group of writers whose experimentation with the vernacular argues for a rethinking of American modernism—one that cuts across traditional boundaries of class, race, and... More


Novel Ventures

Fiction and Print Culture in England, 1690-1730


Leah Orr

The eighteenth century British book trade marks the beginning of the literary marketplace as we know it. The lapsing of the Licensing Act in 1695 brought an end to pre-publication censorship of printed texts and restrictions on the number of printers and presses in Britain. Resisting the standard "... More


The Imbible

A Cocktail Guide for Beginning and Home Bartenders


Micah LeMon

Micah LeMon had one slight problem when he started bartending nearly twenty years ago: he had no idea what he was doing. Mixology, he came to understand, is based on principles that are indispensable but not widely known. In The Imbible, LeMon shares the knowledge he has gained over two decades, so... More


Memoirs on the Life and Travels of Thomas Hammond, 1748-1775



Thomas Hammond. Edited by George E. Boulukos

A lavishly illustrated manuscript from the eighteenth century now being published for the first time, Thomas Hammond's memoirs are a major discovery. Hammond was a self-educated but remarkably gifted writer with a knack for seizing unlikely opportunities for adventure. We follow this abandoned waif... More


Questioning Nature

British Women's Scientific Writing and Literary Originality, 1750-1830


Melissa Bailes

In the mid-eighteenth century, many British authors and literary critics anxiously claimed that poetry was in crisis. These writers complained that modern poets plagiarized classical authors as well as one another, asserted that no new subjects for verse remained, and feared poetry's complete... More


The Algerian New Novel

The Poetics of a Modern Nation, 1950-1979


Valérie K. Orlando

Disputing the claim that Algerian writing during the struggle against French colonial rule dealt almost exclusively with revolutionary themes, The Algerian New Novel shows how Algerian authors writing in French actively contributed to the experimental forms of the period, expressing a new age... More


Best New Poets 2016

50 Poems from Emerging Writers


Edited by Mary Szybist. Series edited by Jeb Livingood and Angie Hogan

Entering its eleventh year, Best New Poets has established itself as a crucial venue for rising poets and a valuable resource for poetry lovers. The only publication of its kind, this annual anthology is made up exclusively of work by writers who have not yet published a full-length book. The poems... More


Mathilde Blind

Late-Victorian Culture and the Woman of Letters


James Diedrick

With Mathilde Blind: Late-Victorian Culture and the Woman of Letters, James Diedrick offers a groundbreaking critical biography of the German-born British poet Mathilde Blind (1841–1896), a freethinking radical feminist. Born to politically radical parents, Blind had, by the time she was thirty,... More


Grief and Meter

Elegies for Poets after Auden


Sally Connolly

The elegizing of poets is one of the oldest and most enduring traditions in English poetry. Many of the most influential and best-known poems in the language—such as Milton’s "Lycidas," Shelley’s "Adonais," and Auden’s "In Memory of W. B. Yeats"—are elegies for poets.In Grief and Meter, Sally... More


The Mudimbe Reader



V. Y. Mudimbe. Edited by Pierre-Philippe Fraiture and Daniel Orrells

A prominent francophone thinker and writer from sub-Saharan Africa, V. Y. Mudimbe is known for his efforts to bridge Western and African modes of knowledge and for his critiques of a range of disciplines, from classics and philosophy to anthropology and comparative literature. The Mudimbe Reader... More


Beautiful Deceptions

European Aesthetics, the Early American Novel, and Illusionist Art


Philipp Schweighauser

The art of the early republic abounds in representations of deception: the villains of Gothic novels deceive their victims with visual and acoustic tricks; the ordinary citizens of picaresque novels are hoodwinked by quacks and illiterate but shrewd adventurers; and innocent sentimental heroines... More


Margaret Garner

The Premiere Performances of Toni Morrison's Libretto


Edited by La Vinia Delois Jennings

In January 1856, Margaret Garner—an enslaved woman on a Kentucky plantation—ran with members of her family to the free state of Ohio. As slave catchers attempted to capture the fugitives in Cincinnati, Garner cut the throat of her two-and-a-half-year-old daughter to prevent her return to slavery.... More


Inter-tech(s)

Colonialism and the Question of Technology in Francophone Literature


Roxanna Nydia Curto

Challenging the notion that francophone literature generally valorizes a traditional, natural mode of being over a scientific, modern one, Inter-tech(s) proposes a new understanding of the relationship between France and its former colonies in Africa and the Caribbean by exploring how various... More


Elizabeth Bishop's Brazil



Bethany Hicok

When the American poet Elizabeth Bishop arrived in Brazil in 1951 at the age of forty, she had not planned to stay, but her love affair with the Brazilian aristocrat Lota de Macedo Soares and with the country itself set her on another course, and Brazil became her home for nearly two decades. In... More


Spectacular Suffering

Witnessing Slavery in the Eighteenth-Century British Atlantic


Ramesh Mallipeddi

Spectacular Suffering focuses on commodification and discipline, two key dimensions of Atlantic slavery through which black bodies were turned into things in the marketplace and persons into property on plantations. Mallipeddi approaches the problem of slavery as a problem of embodiment in this... More


The Art of Fiction



James Salter. Introduction by John D. Casey

James Salter’s exalted place in American letters is based largely on the intense admiration of other writers, but his work resonates far beyond the realm of fellow craftsmen, addressing themes--youth, war, erotic love, marriage, life abroad, friendship--that speak to us all.Following the... More


Empiricist Devotions

Science, Religion, and Poetry in Early Eighteenth-Century England


Courtney Weiss Smith

Featuring a moment in late seventeenth- and early eighteenth-century England before the disciplinary divisions that we inherit today were established, Empiricist Devotions recovers a kind of empiricist thinking in which the techniques and emphases of science, religion, and literature combined and... More


Fashion and Fiction

Self-Transformation in Twentieth-Century American Literature


Lauren S. Cardon

During the twentieth century, the rise of the concept of Americanization—shedding ethnic origins and signs of "otherness" to embrace a constructed American identity—was accompanied by a rhetoric of personal transformation that would ultimately characterize the American Dream. The theme of self-... More


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