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Literary and Cultural Studies


Elizabeth Bishop's Brazil



Bethany Hicok

When the American poet Elizabeth Bishop arrived in Brazil in 1951 at the age of forty, she had not planned to stay, but her love affair with the Brazilian aristocrat Lota de Macedo Soares and with the country itself set her on another course, and Brazil became her home for nearly two decades. In... More


Spectacular Suffering

Witnessing Slavery in the Eighteenth-Century British Atlantic


Ramesh Mallipeddi

Spectacular Suffering focuses on commodification and discipline, two key dimensions of Atlantic slavery through which black bodies were turned into things in the marketplace and persons into property on plantations. Mallipeddi approaches the problem of slavery as a problem of embodiment in this... More


The Art of Fiction



James Salter. Introduction by John D. Casey

James Salter’s exalted place in American letters is based largely on the intense admiration of other writers, but his work resonates far beyond the realm of fellow craftsmen, addressing themes--youth, war, erotic love, marriage, life abroad, friendship--that speak to us all.Following the... More


Empiricist Devotions

Science, Religion, and Poetry in Early Eighteenth-Century England


Courtney Weiss Smith

Featuring a moment in late seventeenth- and early eighteenth-century England before the disciplinary divisions that we inherit today were established, Empiricist Devotions recovers a kind of empiricist thinking in which the techniques and emphases of science, religion, and literature combined and... More


Fashion and Fiction

Self-Transformation in Twentieth-Century American Literature


Lauren S. Cardon

During the twentieth century, the rise of the concept of Americanization—shedding ethnic origins and signs of "otherness" to embrace a constructed American identity—was accompanied by a rhetoric of personal transformation that would ultimately characterize the American Dream. The theme of self-... More


Jonathan Swift

Our Dean


Eugene Hammond

[Book description not available]


Jonathan Swift

Irish Blow-In


Eugene Hammond

[Book description not available]


No Tomorrow

The Ethics of Pleasure in the French Enlightenment


Catherine Cusset

Winner of the 1996 Walker Cowen Memorial Prize, Catherine Cusset's No Tomorrow traces the moral meaning of pleasure in several libertine works of the eighteenth-century—Watteau's Pélerinage à l'île de Cythère, Prévost's Manon Lescaut, Crébillon's Les égarements du coeur et de l'esprit, the... More


Ruskin's Culture Wars

Fors Clavigera and the Crisis of Victorian Liberalism


Judith Stoddart

"When I consider the quantity of wise talking which has passed in at one long ear of the world, and out at the other, without making the smallest impression upon its mind, I am tempted for the rest of my life to try and do what seems to me rational, silently; and to speak no more."--Ruskin in Fors... More


Monticello in Mind

Fifty Contemporary Poems on Jefferson


Edited by Lisa Russ Spaar

Thomas Jefferson was a figure both central and polarizing in his own time, and despite the passage of two centuries he remains so today. Author of the Declaration of Independence and the Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom, yet at the same time a slaveholder who likely fathered six children by... More


Raving at Usurers

Anti-Finance and the Ethics of Uncertainty in England, 1690-1750


Dwight Codr

In Raving at Usurers, Dwight Codr explores the complex intersection of religion, economics, ethics, and literature in late seventeenth- and eighteenth-century England. Codr offers an alternative to the orthodox story of secular economic modernity's emergence in this key time and place, locating in... More


Studies in Bibliography

Papers of the Bibliographical Society of the University of Virginia


Edited by David L. Vander Meulen

The fifty-ninth volume of Studies in Bibliography continues its tradition of presenting a wide range of articles by international scholars on bibliography, textual criticism, and other aspects of the study of books.This volume opens with an excerpt from a forthcoming memoir by the eminent... More


The Poetics of Poesis

The Making of Nineteenth-Century English Fiction


Felicia Bonaparte

Examining novels written in nineteenth-century England and throughout most of the West, as well as philosophical essays on the conception of fictional form, Felicia Bonaparte sees the novel in this period not as the continuation of eighteenth-century "realism," as has commonly been assumed, but as... More


Best New Poets 2015

50 Poems from Emerging Writers


Edited by Tracy K. Smith. Series edited by Jazzy Danziger

Praise for earlier editions:"[A] reminder that contemporary poetry is not only alive and well but continuing to grow."-- Publishers Weekly"[These poets] prove that American poetry has the strength and vision to move beyond the MFA environment in order to reshape and reflect past traditions."--... More


Barbaric Culture and Black Critique

Black Antislavery Writers, Religion, and the Slaveholding Atlantic


Stefan M. Wheelock

In an interdisciplinary study of black intellectual history at the dawn of the nineteenth century, Stefan M. Wheelock shows how black antislavery writers were able to counteract ideologies of white supremacy while fostering a sense of racial community and identity. The major figures he discusses—... More


Bridges to Memory

Postmemory in Contemporary Ethnic American Women's Fiction


Maria Rice Bellamy

Tracing the development of a new genre in contemporary American literature that was engendered in the civil rights, feminist, and ethnic empowerment struggles of the 1960s and 1970s, Bridges to Memory shows how these movements authorized African American and ethnic American women writers to... More


You Come Too

My Journey with Robert Frost


Lesley Lee Francis. Foreword by Jay Parini

Robert Frost observed in his wife, Elinor, a desire to live "a life that goes rather poetically." The same could be said of many members of the Frost family, over several generations. In You Come Too, Frost’s granddaughter, Lesley Lee Francis, combines priceless personal memories and rigorous... More


Reading Trauma Narratives

The Contemporary Novel and the Psychology of Oppression


Laurie Vickroy

As part of the contemporary reassessment of trauma that goes beyond Freudian psychoanalysis, Laurie Vickroy theorizes trauma in the context of psychological, literary, and cultural criticism. Focusing on novels by Margaret Atwood, William Faulkner, Toni Morrison, Jeanette Winterson, and Chuck... More


Cities of Affluence and Anger

A Literary Geography of Modern Englishness


Peter J. Kalliney

Providing a compact literary history of the twentieth century in England, Cities of Affluence and Anger studies the problematic terms of national identity during England's transition from an imperial power to its integration in the global cultural marketplace. While the countryside had been the... More


Poetry and the Thought of Song in Nineteenth-Century Britain



Elizabeth K. Helsinger

In arguing for the crucial importance of song for poets in the long nineteenth century, Elizabeth Helsinger focuses on both the effects of song on lyric forms and the mythopoetics through which poets explored the affinities of poetry with song. Looking in particular at individual poets and poems,... More


Midcentury Quartet

Bishop, Lowell, Jarrell, Berryman, and the Making of a Postmodern Aesthetic


Thomas J. Travisano

In a February 1966 letter to her artistic confidant, Robert Lowell, Elizabeth Bishop tellingly grouped four midcentury poets: Lowell, Randall Jarrell, John Berryman, and herself. For Bishop--always wary of being pigeonholed and therefore reticent about naming her favorite contemporaries--it was a... More


Ossianic Unconformities

Bardic Poetry in the Industrial Age


Eric Gidal

In a sequence of publications in the 1760s, James Macpherson, a Scottish schoolteacher in the central Highlands, created fantastic epics of ancient heroes and presented them as genuine translations of the poetry of Ossian, a fictionalized Caledonian bard of the third century. In Ossianic... More


The Complete Pamphlets of Lewis Carroll

Games, Puzzles, and Related Pieces


Lewis Carroll. Edited by Christopher Morgan

Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, "Lewis Carroll," was not only the author of the beloved Alice tales but an inveterate and talented creator of puzzles and games in both the recreational mathematics and wordplay fields. Collected together for the first time in this book, his charming and humorous creations... More


Being Apart

Theoretical and Existential Resistance in Africana Literature


LaRose T. Parris

In Being Apart, LaRose Parris draws on traditional and radical Western theory to emphasize how nineteenth- and twentieth-century Africana thinkers explored the two principal existential themes of being and freedom prior to existentialism's rise to prominence in postwar European thought. Emphasizing... More


American Road Narratives

Reimagining Mobility in Literature and Film


Ann Brigham

The freedom to go anywhere and become anyone has profoundly shaped our national psyche. Transforming our sense of place and identity--whether in terms of social and economic status, or race and ethnicity, or gender and sexuality—American mobility is perhaps nowhere more vividly captured than in the... More


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