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Literary and Cultural Studies


Ossianic Unconformities
Bardic Poetry in the Industrial Age Eric Gidal

In a sequence of publications in the 1760s, James Macpherson, a Scottish schoolteacher in the central Highlands, created fantastic epics of ancient heroes and presented them as genuine translations of the poetry of Ossian, a fictionalized Caledonian bard of the third century. In Ossianic... More


The Complete Pamphlets of Lewis Carroll
Games, Puzzles, and Related Pieces Lewis Carroll. Edited by Christopher Morgan

Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, "Lewis Carroll," was not only the author of the beloved Alice tales but an inveterate and talented creator of puzzles and games in both the recreational mathematics and wordplay fields. Collected together for the first time in this book, his charming and humorous creations... More


Being Apart
Theoretical and Existential Resistance in Africana Literature LaRose T. Parris

In Being Apart, LaRose Parris draws on traditional and radical Western theory to emphasize how nineteenth- and twentieth-century Africana thinkers explored the two principal existential themes of being and freedom prior to existentialism's rise to prominence in postwar European thought. Emphasizing... More


Unnatural Frenchmen
The Politics of Priestly Celibacy and Marriage, 1720-1815 E. Claire Cage

In Enlightenment and revolutionary France, new and pressing arguments emerged in the long debate over clerical celibacy. Appeals for the abolition of celibacy were couched primarily in the language of nature, social utility, and the patrie. The attack only intensified after the legalization of... More


American Road Narratives
Reimagining Mobility in Literature and Film Ann Brigham

The freedom to go anywhere and become anyone has profoundly shaped our national psyche. Transforming our sense of place and identity--whether in terms of social and economic status, or race and ethnicity, or gender and sexuality—American mobility is perhaps nowhere more vividly captured than in the... More


The Language of Flowers
A History Beverly Seaton

The author traces the phenomenon of ascribing sentimental meaning to floral imagery from its beginnings in Napoleonic France through its later transformations in England and America. At the heart of the book is a depiction of what the three most important flower books from each of the countries... More


Promises Broken
Courtship, Class, and Gender in Victorian England Ginger S. Frost

In the nineteenth century, a woman who could prove a man had broken his promise to marry her was legally entitled to compensation for damages. Bridging the gap between history and literature, Ginger S. Frost offers an in-depth examination of these breaches of promise and compares actual with... More


Capital Offenses
The Geography of Class and Crime in Victorian London Simon Joyce

As London became the first major city of the nineteenth century, new models of representation emerged in the journalism, poetry, fiction, and social commentary of the period. Simon Joyce argues that such writing reflected a persistent worry about the problem of crime but was never able to contain... More


The Gypsy-Bachelor of Manchester
The Life of Mrs. Gaskell's Demon Felicia Bonaparte

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Modified Rapture
Comedy in W. S. Gilbert's Savoy Operas Alan Fischler

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Tennyson
The Muses' Tug-of-War Daniel Albright

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Victorian Connections
Jerome J. Mcgann, ed.

In Victorian Connections, each contributor was asked to write about anything in the Victorian period, with only one proviso: that the essay seek to draw connections with other disciplines, fields, periods, methodologies or authors. The compliment the essays pay to each other - the way they... More


The Victorian Serial
Linda K. Hughes and Michael Lund

Linda K. Hughes and Michael Lund provide a new approach to the study of installment literature by showing how it embodied a view of life intrinsic to Victorian culture. They examine how the serial format affected the ways Victorian audiences interpreted sixteen major works of poetry and fiction.... More


Author and Printer in Victorian England
Allan C. Dooley

Author and Printer in Victorian England demonstrates that printing technology shapes texts. The technology involved was a nineteenth-century revolution in printing methods; the texts were classic literary works by Victorian authors. What was at stake was textual control: who would decide how the... More


Matthew Arnold and the Betrayal of Language
David G. Riede

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Victorian Publishing and Mrs. Gaskell's Work
Linda K. Hughes and Michael Lund

For much of her own century, Elizabeth Gaskell was recognized as a voice of Victorian convention&emdash;-the loyal wife, good mother, and respected writer&emdash;-a reputation that led to her steady decline in the view of twentieth-century literary critics. Recent scholars, however, have... More


The Vulgarization of Art
The Victorians and Aesthetic Democracy Linda Dowling

In this major reinterpretation of the Victorian Aesthetic Movement, Linda Dowling argues that such classic works of Victorian art writing such as Ruskin's Stones of Venice of Morris's Lectures on Art or Wilde's Critic as Artist become wholly intelligible only within the larger ideological context... More


Beauty
The Value of Values Frederick Turner

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The Child, the State and the Victorian Novel
Laura C. Berry

The Child, the State, and the Victorian Novel traces the the story of victimized childhood to its origins in nineteenth-century Britain. Almost as soon as "childhood" became a distinct category, Laura C. Berry contends, stories of children in danger were circulated as part of larger debates about... More


Culture and Irony
Studies in Joseph Conrad's Major Novels Anthony Winner

Conrad's major novels- Lord Jim, Nostromo, The Secret Agent, and Under Western Eyes-tell of illusions and betrayals, dreams and lies. Ambiguity, contradiction, and irony so dominate the narratives that the more closely one reads, the more difficult it becomes to know what is real or what is true.... More


The Feminine Political Novel in Victorian England
Barbara Leah Harman

In this groundbreaking book, Barbara Leah Harman convincingly establishes a new category in Victorian fiction: the feminine political novel. By studying Victorian female protagonists who participate in the public universe conventionally occupied by men, she is able to reassess the public realm as... More


Paradise Dislocated
Morris, Politics, Art Jeffrey Skoblow

Paradise Dislocated offers a radical rereading of William Morris's neglected masterpiece, The Earthly Paradise. While most critics have seen this poem as the antithesis of the radical socialist politics that Morris embraced later in his career, or, at best, as an awkward prelude to that later... More


Tennyson's Fixations
Psychoanalysis and the Topics of the Early Poetry Matthew Rowlinson

Matthew Rowlinson has given us the most penetrating analysis of Tennyson's poetry to date. He proposes a revitalized and properly analytic formalism as the appropriate model for reading of Tennyson. In a series of original, scrupulously attentive, and sophisticated close readings, he probes the... More


Thomas Hardy and the Proper Study of Mankind
Simon Gatrell

Simon Gatrell offers a fresh and stimulating exploration of Hardy's account in fiction of the individual man or woman's relationship with various aspects of the encompassing world- with other men and women, with the aggregation known as society, with the natural and artificial environment, and with... More


Vanishing Lives
Style and Self in Tennyson, D. G. Rossetti, Swinburne, and Yeats James Richardson

One of the characteristic features of Victorian poetry is dimness, a vanishing away-things blur with the motion of their passing, which seems inseparable from the mind's fading as it lets them go. Tennyson, Rossetti, Swinburne, and the young Yeats are elegists of the self; they render life as... More


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