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Literary and Cultural Studies


Writing through Jane Crow
Race and Gender Politics in African American Literature Ayesha K. Hardison

In Writing through Jane Crow, Ayesha Hardison examines African American literature and its representation of black women during the pivotal but frequently overlooked decades of the 1940s and 1950s. At the height of Jim Crow racial segregation—a time of transition between the Harlem Renaissance and... More


Between the Novel and the News
The Emergence of American Women's Writing Sari Edelstein

While American literary history has long acknowledged the profound influence of journalism on canonical male writers, Sari Edelstein argues that American women writers were also influenced by a dynamic relationship with the mainstream press. From the early republic through the turn of the twentieth... More


Victorian Poets and the Politics of Culture
Discourse and Ideology Antony H. Harrison

With the publication of his ambitious new work Victorian Poets and the Politics of Culture, Antony H. Harrison continues his exploration of poetry as a significant force in the construction of English culture from 1837–1900.In chapters focusing on Victorian medievalist discourse, Alfred Tennyson,... More


Close Kin and Distant Relatives
The Paradox of Respectability in Black Women's Literature Susana M. Morris

The "black family" in the United States and the Caribbean often holds contradictory and competing meanings in public discourse: on the one hand, it is a site of love, strength, and support; on the other hand, it is a site of pathology, brokenness, and dysfunction that has frequently called forth an... More


Best New Poets 2013
50 Poems from Emerging Writers Edited by Brenda Shaughnessy. Series edited by Jazzy Danziger

Praise for earlier editions:"[These poets] prove that American poetry has the strength and vision to move beyond the MFA environment in order to reshape and reflect past traditions."-- Bloomsbury Review"This collection stands out among the crowd claiming to represent emergent poets. Much of the... More


The Life and Undeath of Autonomy in American Literature
Geoff Hamilton

In The Life and Undeath of Autonomy in American Literature, Geoff Hamilton charts the evolution of the fundamental concept of autonomy in the American imaginary across the span of the nation’s literary history. Whereas America’s ideological roots are typically examined in relation to Enlightenment... More


Renaissance Shakespeare/Shakespeare Renaissances
Proceedings of the Ninth World Shakespeare Congress Martin Procházka, Andreas Hoefele, Hanna Scolnicov, and Michael Dobson

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Authorship in the Long Eighteenth Century
Dustin Griffin

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Exodus Politics
Civil Rights and Leadership in African American Literature and Culture Robert J. Patterson

Using the term "exodus politics" to theorize the valorization of black male leadership in the movement for civil rights, Robert J. Patterson explores the ways in which the political strategies and ideologies of this movement paradoxically undermined the collective enfranchisement of black people.... More


The Haverford Discussions
A Black Integrationist Manifesto for Racial Justice Edited by Michael Lackey

In the late sixties and early seventies, black separatist movements were sweeping across the United States. This was the era of The Autobiography of Malcolm X, Stokely Carmichael's and Charles Hamilton's Black Power, and Eldridge Cleaver's Soul on Ice. In 1969 a group of distinguished African... More


Composing Cultures
Modernism, American Literary Studies, and the Problem of Culture Eric Aronoff

The term "culture" has become ubiquitous in both academic and popular conversations, but its usefulness is a point of dispute. Taking the current shift from cultural studies to aesthetics as the latest form of this discussion, Eric Aronoff contends that in American modernism, the concepts of... More


Arras Hanging
The Textile That Determined Early Modern Literature and Drama Rebecca Olson

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Frances Burney and Narrative Prior to Ideology
Brian McCrea

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Drawing the Line
The Father Reimagined in Faulkner, Wright, O'Connor, and Morrison Doreen Fowler

In an original contribution to the psychoanalytic approach to literature, Doreen Fowler focuses on the fiction of four major American writers—William Faulkner, Richard Wright, Flannery O'Connor, and Toni Morrison—to examine the father's function as a "border figure." Although the father has most... More


Migrant Modernism
Postwar London and the West Indian Novel J. Dillon Brown

In Migrant Modernism, J. Dillon Brown examines the intersection between British literary modernism and the foundational West Indian novels that emerged in London after World War II. By emphasizing the location in which anglophone Caribbean writers such as George Lamming, V. S. Naipaul, and Samuel... More


The New Death
American Modernism and World War I Pearl James

Adopting the term "new death," which was used to describe the unprecedented and horrific scale of death caused by the First World War, Pearl James uncovers several touchstones of American modernism that refer to and narrate traumatic death. The sense of paradox was pervasive: death was both... More


Upon Provincialism
Southern Literature and National Periodical Culture, 1870–1900 Bill Hardwig

Drawing on tourist literature, travelogues, and local-color fiction about the South, Bill Hardwig tracks the ways in which the nation's leading interdisciplinary periodicals, especially the Atlantic Monthly, Harper's, and the Century, translated and broadcast the predominant narratives about the... More


Prologues and Epilogues of Restoration Theater
Gender and Comedy, Performance and Print Diana Solomon

[Book description not available]


Scarecrows of Chivalry
English Masculinities after Empire Praseeda Gopinath

Exploring the fate of the ideal of the English gentleman once the empire he was meant to embody declined, Praseeda Gopinath argues that the stylization of English masculinity became the central theme, focus, and conceit for many literary texts that represented the "condition of Britain" in the... More


Supposing Bleak House
John O. Jordan

Supposing "Bleak House" is an extended meditation on what many consider to be Dickens’s and nineteenth-century England’s greatest work of narrative fiction. Focusing on the novel’s retrospective narrator, whom he identifies as Esther Woodcourt in order to distinguish her from her younger,... More


Liberal Epic
The Victorian Practice of History from Gibbon to Churchill Edward Adams

In Liberal Epic, Edward Adams examines the liberal imagination’s centuries-long dependence on contradictory, and mutually constitutive, attitudes toward violent domination. Adams centers his ambitious analysis on a series of major epic poems, histories, and historical novels, including Dryden’s... More


Be It Ever So Humble
Poverty, Fiction, and the Invention of the Middle-Class Home Scott R. MacKenzie

Before the rise of private homes as we now understand them, the realm of personal, private, and local relations in England was the parish, which was also the sphere of poverty management. Between the 1740s and the 1790s, legislators, political economists, reformers, and novelists transferred the... More


Artistic Ambassadors
Literary and International Representation of the New Negro Era Brian Russell Roberts

During the first generation of black participation in U.S. diplomacy in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, a vibrant community of African American writers and cultural figures worked as U.S. representatives abroad. Through the literary and diplomatic dossiers of figures such as... More


Transmigrational Writings between the Maghreb and Sub-Saharan Africa
Literature, Orality, Visual Arts Hélène Colette Tissières. Translated by Marjolijn de Jager

In this innovative and skillful study, Hélène Tissières investigates the "circulations" or transmigrations at work among multiple francophone African cultural forms, ranging geographically between North and sub-Saharan Africa, culturally between words and silences, verbally between spoken and... More


Steinbeck in Vietnam
Dispatches from the War John Steinbeck. Edited by Thomas E. Barden

Although his career continued for almost three decades after the 1939 publication of The Grapes of Wrath, John Steinbeck is still most closely associated with his Depression-era works of social struggle. But from Pearl Harbor on, he often wrote passionate accounts of America’s wars based on his own... More


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