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Literary and Cultural Studies


Composing Cultures

Modernism, American Literary Studies, and the Problem of Culture


Eric Aronoff

The term "culture" has become ubiquitous in both academic and popular conversations, but its usefulness is a point of dispute. Taking the current shift from cultural studies to aesthetics as the latest form of this discussion, Eric Aronoff contends that in American modernism, the concepts of... More


Arras Hanging

The Textile That Determined Early Modern Literature and Drama


Rebecca Olson

[Book description not available]


Frances Burney and Narrative Prior to Ideology



Brian McCrea

[Book description not available]


Women's Work

Nationalism and Contemporary African American Women's Novels


Courtney Thorsson

In Women’s Work, Courtney Thorsson reconsiders the gender, genre, and geography of African American nationalism as she explores the aesthetic history of African American writing by women. Building on and departing from the Black Arts Movement, the literary fiction of such writers as Toni Cade... More


Drawing the Line

The Father Reimagined in Faulkner, Wright, O'Connor, and Morrison


Doreen Fowler

In an original contribution to the psychoanalytic approach to literature, Doreen Fowler focuses on the fiction of four major American writers—William Faulkner, Richard Wright, Flannery O'Connor, and Toni Morrison—to examine the father's function as a "border figure." Although the father has most... More


Migrant Modernism

Postwar London and the West Indian Novel


J. Dillon Brown

In Migrant Modernism, J. Dillon Brown examines the intersection between British literary modernism and the foundational West Indian novels that emerged in London after World War II. By emphasizing the location in which anglophone Caribbean writers such as George Lamming, V. S. Naipaul, and Samuel... More


The New Death

American Modernism and World War I


Pearl James

Adopting the term "new death," which was used to describe the unprecedented and horrific scale of death caused by the First World War, Pearl James uncovers several touchstones of American modernism that refer to and narrate traumatic death. The sense of paradox was pervasive: death was both... More


Upon Provincialism

Southern Literature and National Periodical Culture, 1870–1900


Bill Hardwig

Drawing on tourist literature, travelogues, and local-color fiction about the South, Bill Hardwig tracks the ways in which the nation's leading interdisciplinary periodicals, especially the Atlantic Monthly, Harper's, and the Century, translated and broadcast the predominant narratives about the... More


Prologues and Epilogues of Restoration Theater

Gender and Comedy, Performance and Print


Diana Solomon

[Book description not available]


Scarecrows of Chivalry

English Masculinities after Empire


Praseeda Gopinath

Exploring the fate of the ideal of the English gentleman once the empire he was meant to embody declined, Praseeda Gopinath argues that the stylization of English masculinity became the central theme, focus, and conceit for many literary texts that represented the "condition of Britain" in the... More


Supposing Bleak House



John O. Jordan

Supposing "Bleak House" is an extended meditation on what many consider to be Dickens’s and nineteenth-century England’s greatest work of narrative fiction. Focusing on the novel’s retrospective narrator, whom he identifies as Esther Woodcourt in order to distinguish her from her younger,... More


Liberal Epic

The Victorian Practice of History from Gibbon to Churchill


Edward Adams

In Liberal Epic, Edward Adams examines the liberal imagination’s centuries-long dependence on contradictory, and mutually constitutive, attitudes toward violent domination. Adams centers his ambitious analysis on a series of major epic poems, histories, and historical novels, including Dryden’s... More


Be It Ever So Humble

Poverty, Fiction, and the Invention of the Middle-Class Home


Scott R. MacKenzie

Before the rise of private homes as we now understand them, the realm of personal, private, and local relations in England was the parish, which was also the sphere of poverty management. Between the 1740s and the 1790s, legislators, political economists, reformers, and novelists transferred the... More


Artistic Ambassadors

Literary and International Representation of the New Negro Era


Brian Russell Roberts

During the first generation of black participation in U.S. diplomacy in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, a vibrant community of African American writers and cultural figures worked as U.S. representatives abroad. Through the literary and diplomatic dossiers of figures such as... More


Transmigrational Writings between the Maghreb and Sub-Saharan Africa

Literature, Orality, Visual Arts


Hélène Colette Tissières. Translated by Marjolijn de Jager

In this innovative and skillful study, Hélène Tissières investigates the "circulations" or transmigrations at work among multiple francophone African cultural forms, ranging geographically between North and sub-Saharan Africa, culturally between words and silences, verbally between spoken and... More


Steinbeck in Vietnam

Dispatches from the War


John Steinbeck. Edited by Thomas E. Barden

Although his career continued for almost three decades after the 1939 publication of The Grapes of Wrath, John Steinbeck is still most closely associated with his Depression-era works of social struggle. But from Pearl Harbor on, he often wrote passionate accounts of America’s wars based on his own... More


Reclaiming Nostalgia

Longing for Nature in American Literature


Jennifer K. Ladino

Often thought of as the quintessential home or the Eden from which humanity has fallen, the natural world has long been a popular object of nostalgic narratives. In Reclaiming Nostalgia, Jennifer Ladino assesses the ideological effects of this phenomenon by tracing its dominant forms in American... More


Technologies of Empire

Writing, Imagination, and the Making of Imperial Networks, 1750–1821


Dermot Ryan

[Book description not available]


Best New Poets 2012

50 Poems from Emerging Writers


Edited by Matthew Dickman. Series edited by Jazzy Danziger

Entering its seventh year, Best New Poets has established itself as a crucial venue for rising poets and a valuable resource for poetry lovers. The only publication of its kind, this annual anthology is made up exclusively of work by writers who have not yet published a full-length book. The poems... More


Characters of Blood

Black Heroism in the Transatlantic Imagination


Celeste-Marie Bernier

Across the centuries, the acts and arts of black heroism have inspired a provocative, experimental, and self-reflexive intellectual, political, and aesthetic tradition. In Characters of Blood, Celeste-Marie Bernier illuminates the ways in which six iconic men and women—Toussaint Louverture,... More


Women Warriors in Romantic Drama



Wendy C. Nielsen

[Book description not available]


Bad Books

Rétif de la Bretonne, Sexuality, and Pornography


Amy S. Wyngaard

[Book description not available]


The Master, the Modern Major General, and His Clever Wife

Henry James's Letters to Field Marshal Lord Wolseley and Lady Wolseley, 1878–1913


Henry James. Edited by Alan G. James

As his letters attest, for nearly forty years Henry James enjoyed a warm and gratifying friendship with Britain’s foremost soldier of the last quarter of the nineteenth century and his wife. The Wolseleys were notable figures. Lord Wolseley, the field marshal who became Britain’s commander in chief... More


Neobaroque in the Americas

Alternative Modernities in Literature, Visual Art, and Film


Monika Kaup

In a comparative and interdisciplinary analysis of modern and postmodern literature, film, art, and visual culture, Monika Kaup examines the twentieth century's recovery of the baroque within a hemispheric framework embracing North America, Latin America, and U.S. Latino/a culture. As "neobaroque"... More


Pleasures and Pains



Barry E. Milligan

[Book description not available]


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