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Literary and Cultural Studies


Studies in Bibliography

Papers of the Bibliographical Society of the University of Virginia


Edited by David L. Vander Meulen

[Book description not available]


The Knowing Most Worth Doing

Essays on Pluralism, Ethics, and Religion


Wayne Booth. Edited by Walter Jost

Throughout the second half of the twentieth century until his death in 2005, Wayne Booth was one of the most influential literary critics in America and beyond, known worldwide for The Rhetoric of Fiction (1961), and hailed as a progressive advocate for rethinking the concept of liberal education... More


Written on the Water

British Romanticism and the Maritime Empire of Culture


Samuel Baker

The very word "culture" has traditionally evoked the land. But when such writers as William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Lord Byron, and, later, Matthew Arnold developed what would become the idea of modern culture, they modeled that idea on Britain's imperial command of the sea. Instead of... More


American Iconographic

National Geographic, Global Culture, and the Visual Imagination


Stephanie L. Hawkins

In an era before affordable travel, National Geographic not only served as the first glimpse of countless other worlds for its readers, but it helped them confront sweeping historical change. There was a time when its cover, with the unmistakable yellow frame, seemed to be on every coffee table, in... More


Not Only War

A Story of Two Great Conflicts


Victor Daly. edited by David A. Davis

Not Only War: A Story of Two Great Conflicts is the only World War I novel written by an African American veteran. In the book, Montgomery Jason, an idealistic African American college student, enlists to fight for freedom and democracy. When he falls in love with a French woman, he learns that... More


Semi-Detached Empire

Suburbia and the Colonization of Britain, 1880 to the Present


Todd Kuchta

In the first book to consider British suburban literature from the vantage point of imperial and postcolonial studies, Todd Kuchta argues that suburban identity is tied to the empire’s rise and fall. He takes his title from the type of home synonymous with suburbia. Like the semi-detached house,... More


Reading for the Law

British Literary History and Gender Advocacy


Christine L. Krueger

Taking her title from the British term for legal study, "to read for the law," Christine L. Krueger asks how "reading for the law" as literary history contributes to the progressive educational purposes of the Law and Literature movement. She argues that a multidisciplinary "historical narrative... More


The Little Peul



Mariama Barry. Translated by Carrol F. Coates. Introduction by Irène Assiba d'Almeida

Born in Dakar but of Guinean origin, Mariama Barry claims both Senegal and Guinea as "her" countries. This dual background lends her significant and widespread visibility not only because she is the first woman writer of Guinea to have gained extensive international recognition but also because... More


Romantic Writing and the Empire of Signs

Periodical Culture and Post-Napoleonic Authorship


Karen Fang

Nineteenth-century periodicals frequently compared themselves to the imperial powers then dissecting the globe, and this interest in imperialism can be seen in the exotic motifs that surfaced in works by such late Romantic authors as John Keats, Charles Lamb, James Hogg, Letitia Landon, and Lord... More


Traumatic Possessions

The Body and Memory in African American Women's Writing and Performance


Jennifer L. Griffiths

Studies of traumatic stress have explored the challenges to memory as a result of extreme experience, particularly in relation to the ways in which trauma resonates within the survivor’s body and the difficulties survivors face when trying to incorporate their experience into meaningful narratives... More


Spectacular Blackness

The Cultural Politics of the Black Power Movement and the Search for a Black Aesthetic


Amy Abugo Ongiri

Exploring the interface between the cultural politics of the Black Power and the Black Arts movements and the production of postwar African American popular culture, Amy Ongiri shows how the reliance of Black politics on an oppositional image of African Americans was the formative moment in the... More


Best New Poets 2009

50 Poems from Emerging Writers


Edited by Kim Addonizio. Series edited by Jeb Livingood

Entering its fourth year, Best New Poets has established itself as a crucial venue for rising poets and a valuable resource for poetry lovers. The only publication of its kind, this annual anthology is made up exclusively of work by writers who have not yet published a full-length book. The poems... More


Wanted

The Outlaw in American Visual Culture


Rachel Hall

Assembling a rich archive of images and texts from the eighteenth century to the present, Rachel Hall offers a history of the "wanted" poster, examining its uses, patterns of circulation, and formal development as an iconic print genre. Her narrative covers a wide range of images: execution... More


Acts of Narrative Resistance

Women's Autobiographical Writings in the Americas


Laura J. Beard

This exploration of women's autobiographical writings in the Americas focuses on three specific genres: testimonio, metafiction, and the family saga as the story of a nation. What makes Laura J. Beard’s work distinctive is her pairing of readings of life narratives by women from different countries... More


Above All, Don't Look Back



Maïssa Bey. translation by Senja L. Djelouah; introduction by Mildred P. Mortimer

Above All, Don't Look Back follows the path of a young woman—Amina—as she makes her way through a city, a life, and a sense of self that have been ravaged by an earthquake. In this powerful novel, inspired by a devastating earthquake in northern Algeria in 2003, the acclaimed Algerian writer... More


Something Understood

Essays and Poetry for Helen Vendler


Stephen Burt,, and Nick Halpern, ed.

Helen Vendler may be America’s most important poetry critic. A winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award, Vendler has remained a key figure in the academy while also teaching a much larger public how to read and enjoy poems and poetry through her many articles for the New Yorker, the New... More


Our Coquettes

Capacious Desire in the Eighteenth Century


Theresa Braunschneider

Before 1660, English readers and theatergoers had never heard of a "coquette"; by the early 1700s, they could hardly watch a play, read a poem, or peruse a newspaper without encountering one. Why does British literature of this period pay so much attention to vain and flirtatious young women? Our... More


The Power of Negative Thinking

Cynicism and the History of Modern American Literature


Benjamin Schreier

Benjamin Schreier is suspicious of a simple equation of cynicism with quietism, nihilism, selfishness, or false consciousness, and he rejects the notion that modern cynicism represents something categorically different from the classical outlook of Diogenes. He proposes, instead, that cynicism... More


Text as Process

Creative Composition in Wordsworth, Tennyson, and Dickinson


Sally Bushell

Text as Process is about the literary work before it becomes a completed work of art. It is concerned with draft materials, with the manuscripts that constitute text in a state of process. What is text as process? And what should we, as readers, try to do with it?Bushell’s aim in Text as Process... More


"A God of Justice?"

The Problem of Evil in Twentieth-Century Black Literature


Qiana J. Whitted

Focusing on the representations of spiritual crisis in twentieth-century African American fiction and autobiography, Qiana J. Whitted asks how some of the most distinguished writers of this tradition wrestle with the inexplicable nature of God and the experience of unmerited natural and moral... More


Cotton's Queer Relations

Same-Sex Intimacy and the Literature of the Southern Plantation, 1936-1968


Michael P. Bibler

Finally breaking through heterosexual clichés of flirtatious belles and cavaliers, sinister black rapists and lusty "Jezebels," Cotton’s Queer Relations exposes the queer dynamics embedded in myths of the southern plantation. Focusing on works by Ernest J. Gaines, William Faulkner, Tennessee... More


A Rain of Words

A Bilingual Anthology of Women's Poetry in Francophone Africa


Irène Assiba d'Almeida, ed. Translated by Janis A. Mayes

Although the past two decades have seen a wide recognition of the notable fiction written in French by African women, little attention has been given to their equally significant poetry. A Rain of Words is the first comprehensive attempt to survey the poetic production of these women, collecting... More


The Dynamics of Genre

Journalism and the Practice of Literature in Mid-Victorian Britain


Dallas Liddle

Newspapers, magazines, and other periodicals reached a peak of cultural influence and financial success in Britain in the 1850s and 1860s, out-publishing and out-selling books as much as one hundred to one. But although scholars have long known that writing for the vast periodical marketplace... More


The Fowl and the Pussycat

Love Letters of Michael Field, 1876–1909


Michael Field. Edited by Sharon Bickle

Michael Field was the pseudonym used by Katherine Bradley (1846-1914) and Edith Cooper (1862-1913) coauthors and lovers for the poetry and verse drama they published. This edition of the love letters of Michael Field brings together for the first time a personal correspondence thought lost by... More


Studies in Bibliography

Papers of the Bibliographical Society of the University of Virginia


Edited by David L. Vander Meulen

[Book description not available]


Pages