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Literary and Cultural Studies


Acts of Narrative Resistance

Women's Autobiographical Writings in the Americas


Laura J. Beard

This exploration of women's autobiographical writings in the Americas focuses on three specific genres: testimonio, metafiction, and the family saga as the story of a nation. What makes Laura J. Beard’s work distinctive is her pairing of readings of life narratives by women from different countries... More


Above All, Don't Look Back



Maïssa Bey. translation by Senja L. Djelouah; introduction by Mildred P. Mortimer

Above All, Don't Look Back follows the path of a young woman—Amina—as she makes her way through a city, a life, and a sense of self that have been ravaged by an earthquake. In this powerful novel, inspired by a devastating earthquake in northern Algeria in 2003, the acclaimed Algerian writer... More


Something Understood

Essays and Poetry for Helen Vendler


Stephen Burt,, and Nick Halpern, ed.

Helen Vendler may be America’s most important poetry critic. A winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award, Vendler has remained a key figure in the academy while also teaching a much larger public how to read and enjoy poems and poetry through her many articles for the New Yorker, the New... More


Our Coquettes

Capacious Desire in the Eighteenth Century


Theresa Braunschneider

Before 1660, English readers and theatergoers had never heard of a "coquette"; by the early 1700s, they could hardly watch a play, read a poem, or peruse a newspaper without encountering one. Why does British literature of this period pay so much attention to vain and flirtatious young women? Our... More


The Power of Negative Thinking

Cynicism and the History of Modern American Literature


Benjamin Schreier

Benjamin Schreier is suspicious of a simple equation of cynicism with quietism, nihilism, selfishness, or false consciousness, and he rejects the notion that modern cynicism represents something categorically different from the classical outlook of Diogenes. He proposes, instead, that cynicism... More


Text as Process

Creative Composition in Wordsworth, Tennyson, and Dickinson


Sally Bushell

Text as Process is about the literary work before it becomes a completed work of art. It is concerned with draft materials, with the manuscripts that constitute text in a state of process. What is text as process? And what should we, as readers, try to do with it?Bushell’s aim in Text as Process... More


"A God of Justice?"

The Problem of Evil in Twentieth-Century Black Literature


Qiana J. Whitted

Focusing on the representations of spiritual crisis in twentieth-century African American fiction and autobiography, Qiana J. Whitted asks how some of the most distinguished writers of this tradition wrestle with the inexplicable nature of God and the experience of unmerited natural and moral... More


Cotton's Queer Relations

Same-Sex Intimacy and the Literature of the Southern Plantation, 1936-1968


Michael P. Bibler

Finally breaking through heterosexual clichés of flirtatious belles and cavaliers, sinister black rapists and lusty "Jezebels," Cotton’s Queer Relations exposes the queer dynamics embedded in myths of the southern plantation. Focusing on works by Ernest J. Gaines, William Faulkner, Tennessee... More


A Rain of Words

A Bilingual Anthology of Women's Poetry in Francophone Africa


Irène Assiba d'Almeida, ed. Translated by Janis A. Mayes

Although the past two decades have seen a wide recognition of the notable fiction written in French by African women, little attention has been given to their equally significant poetry. A Rain of Words is the first comprehensive attempt to survey the poetic production of these women, collecting... More


The Dynamics of Genre

Journalism and the Practice of Literature in Mid-Victorian Britain


Dallas Liddle

Newspapers, magazines, and other periodicals reached a peak of cultural influence and financial success in Britain in the 1850s and 1860s, out-publishing and out-selling books as much as one hundred to one. But although scholars have long known that writing for the vast periodical marketplace... More


The Fowl and the Pussycat

Love Letters of Michael Field, 1876–1909


Michael Field. Edited by Sharon Bickle

Michael Field was the pseudonym used by Katherine Bradley (1846-1914) and Edith Cooper (1862-1913) coauthors and lovers for the poetry and verse drama they published. This edition of the love letters of Michael Field brings together for the first time a personal correspondence thought lost by... More


Studies in Bibliography

Papers of the Bibliographical Society of the University of Virginia


Edited by David L. Vander Meulen

[Book description not available]


Best New Poets 2008

50 Poems from Emerging Writers


Edited by Mark Strand. Series edited by Jeb Livingood

The only publication of its kind, this annual anthology is made up exclusively of work by writers who have not yet published a full-length book. The poems included in this eclectic sampling represent the best from the many that have been nominated by the country’s top literary magazines and writing... More


A Guide to Documentary Editing



Mary-Jo Kline and Susan Holbrook Perdue. Foreword by Roger A. Bruns

For more than twenty years, A Guide to Documentary Editing has proven an invaluable tool for scholarly editors, editors-in-training, readers of documentary editions, and other students of American history and literature. This new, extensively revised edition of the Guide arrives in the midst of... More


What Should I Read Next?

70 University of Virginia Professors Recommend Readings in History, Politics, Literature, Math, Science, Technology, the Arts, and More


Jessica Feldman and Robert Stilling, eds.

" I cannot live without books."—Thomas JeffersonEven the most well-read among us feel gaps in our knowledge. Former English majors or art students want to understand the monetary system; mathematicians or doctors just want a great novel. Travel sections in bookstores are full of authors ready to... More


The Diasporan Self

Unbreaking the Circle in Western Black Novels


J. Lee Greene

Through its critical examination of novels by Toni Morrison, Charles Johnson, Sherley Anne Williams, Octavia Butler, John Edgar Wideman, Phyllis Perry, Ishmael Reed, Caryl Phillips, and others, The Diasporan Self presents a fresh and insightful approach to canonical and noncanonical contemporary... More


Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám

A Critical Edition


Edward Fitzgerald. Edited by Christopher Decker

Edward FitzGerald’s translation of the Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám, perhaps the most frequently read Victorian poem and certainly one of the most popular poems in the English language, poses formidable challenges to an editor. FitzGerald compulsively revised his work, alternately swayed by friends’... More


All That Mighty Heart

London Poems


Lisa Russ Spaar, ed.

Lisa Russ Spaar has assembled a collection of poems about London to appeal to most anyone: the student abroad for a semester, the armchair traveler, or the most critical reader of poetry. The book conveys a sense that London, as both city and text, is a place of exile and transplantation, a protean... More


African Americans and the Culture of Pain



Debra Walker King

In this compelling new study, Debra Walker King considers fragments of experience recorded in oral histories and newspapers as well as those produced in twentieth-century novels, films, and television that reveal how the black body in pain functions as a rhetorical device and as political strategy... More


Byrd's Line

A Natural History


Stephen Conrad Ausband

In 1728, William Byrd, the wealthy, English-educated master of Westover plantation, undertook a journey with a troop of commissioners, surveyors, and woodsmen to determine the exact boundary between North Carolina and Virginia. Byrd was not only an indefatigable explorer but also an amateur... More


Border Fictions

Globalization, Empire, and Writing at the Boundaries of the United States


Claudia Sadowski-Smith

Border Fictions offers the first comparative analysis of multiethnic and transnational cultural representations about the United States' borders with Mexico and Canada. Blending textual analysis with theories of globalization and empire, Claudia Sadowski-Smith forges a new model of inter-American... More


Best New Poets 2007

50 Poems from Emerging Writers


Edited by Natasha Trethewey. Series edited by Jeb Livingood

Praise for earlier editions:"Unlike novelists and bad-boy memoirists, emerging poets are unlikely to sprawl on Oprah’s couch, date starlets, or rouse bidding wars. With an alert ear for new voices, this anthology offers a different kind of validation: that of being well heard. The result is a... More


Black Fascisms

African American Literature and Culture between the Wars


Mark Christian Thompson

In this provocative new book, Mark Christian Thompson addresses the startling fact that many African American intellectuals in the 1930s sympathized with fascism, seeing in its ideology a means of envisioning new modes of African American political resistance. Thompson surveys the work and thought... More


The Invading Body

Reading Illness Autobiographies


Einat Avrahami

Widely debated in feminist, poststructuralist, and literary theory is the relationship between subjectivity and the body. Yet autobiographical criticism--an obvious place for testing this conceptual relationship--has lagged behind contemporary queries about the embodied self. In The Invading Body,... More


Victorian Prism

Refractions of the Crystal Palace


Edited by James Buzard, Joseph W. Childers, and Eileen Gillooly

From the moment it opened on the first of May in the Crystal Palace in Hyde Park, London, the Great Exhibition of 1851 was one of the defining events of the Victorian period. It stood not only as a visible symbol of British industrial and technological progress but as a figure for modernity--a... More


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