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A Nation Divided: Studies in the Civil War Era

This series seeks out the best new scholarship on the U.S. Civil War era, particularly works that connect the war to the major themes of the era and that integrate the social, political, economic, and cultural experiences of the period with military events.

Series Editors: Orville Vernon Burton and Elizabeth R. Varon


The Enemy Within
Fears of Corruption in the Civil War North Michael Thomas Smith

Stoked by a series of major scandals, popular fears of corruption in the Civil War North provide a unique window into Northern culture in the Civil War era. In The Enemy Within, Michael Thomas Smith relates these scandals—including those involving John C. Frémont’s administration in Missouri,... More


The Big House after Slavery
Virginia Plantation Families and Their Postbellum Domestic Experiment Amy Feely Morsman

The Big House after Slavery examines the economic, social, and political challenges that Virginia planter families faced following Confederate defeat and emancipation. Amy Feely Morsman addresses how men and women of the planter class responded to postwar problems and how their adaptations to life... More


Take Care of the Living
Reconstructing Confederate Veteran Families in Virginia Jeffrey W. McClurken

Take Care of the Living assesses the short- and long-term impact of the war on Confederate veteran families of all classes in Pittsylvania County and Danville, Virginia. Using letters, diaries, church minutes, and military and state records, as well as close analysis of the entire 1860 and 1870... More


Civil War Petersburg
Confederate City in the Crucible of War A. Wilson Greene

Few wartime cities in Virginia held more importance than Petersburg. Nonetheless, the city has, until now, lacked an adequate military history, let alone a history of the civilian home front. The noted Civil War historian A. Wilson Greene now provides an expertly researched, eloquently written... More


Lincoln's Tragic Admiral
The Life of Samuel Francis Du Pont Kevin J. Weddle

Once revered as one of the finest officers in the U.S. Navy, Rear Admiral Samuel Francis Du Pont is now, when remembered at all, criticized for resisting technological advancement and for half-heartedly leading the disastrous all-ironclad Union naval attack on Charleston. Although his reputation... More


Ashe County's Civil War
Community and Society in the Appalachian South Martin Crawford

Distinguished from traditional historical narrative by its balanced portrayal of wartime experiences both at home and on the battlefield and flavored by its vivid portrayal of a divided Appalachian community, Ashe County's Civil War: Community and Society in the Appalachian South breaks new ground... More


Exile in Richmond
The Confederate Journal of Henri Garidel Michael Bedout Chesson and Leslie Jean Roberts, eds.

Expelled from occupied New Orleans by Federal forces after refusing to pledge loyalty to the Union, Henri Garidel remained in exile from his home and family from 1863 to 1865. Lonely, homesick, and alienated, the French-Catholic Garidel, a clerk in the Confederate Bureau of Ordnance, was a complete... More


Southern Rights
Political Prisoners and the Myth of Confederate Constitutionalism Mark E. Neely, Jr.

On the day Fort Sumter surrendered to Confederate authorities, General Braxton Bragg reacted to a newspaper report that might have revealed the position of gun emplacements by placing the correspondent, a Southern loyalist, under arrest. Thus the Confederate army's first detention of a citizen... More


Lee's Young Artillerist
William R J Pegram Peter S. Carmichael

William R. J. Pegram forged a record as one of the most prominent artillerists in the Army of Northern Virginia. He participated in every major battle in Virginia and rose form sergeant to full colonel by the end of the war. Neither zealot nor fanatic, Pegram shared the values of the South's ruling... More


Yankee Correspondence
Civil War Letters between New England Soldiers and the Home Front Nina Silber and Mary Beth Sievens

These letters by New England soldiers and their families, many published for the first time, speak of the hardships of the war, especially frustrations with the army, homefront suffering, and government policies. They are grouped by six major themes: the military experience, the meaning of the war... More


Black Confederates and Afro-Yankees in Civil War Virginia
Ervin L. Jordan, Jr.

On the eve of the Civil War, more Afircan-Americans lived in Virginia than in any other state- 490,000 slaves and 59,000 free blacks- and they were active participants in the single most dynamic event to shape the American consciousness. Black Confederates and Afro-Yankees in Civil War Virginia is... More


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