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New World Studies

New World Studies publishes interdisciplinary research that seeks to redefine the cultural map of the Americas and to propose particularly stimulating points of departure for an emerging field. Encompassing the Caribbean as well as continental North, Central, and South America, the series books examine cultural processes within the hemisphere, taking into account the economic, demographic, and historical phenomena that shape them. Given the increasing diversity and richness of the linguistic and cultural traditions in the Americas, the need for research that privileges neither the English-speaking United States nor Spanish-speaking Latin America has never been greater. The series is designed to bring the best of this new research into an identifiable forum and to channel its results to the rapidly evolving audience for cultural studies.

Series Editor: Marlene Daut
UVP Editor: Eric Brandt


Comrade Sister

Caribbean Feminist Revisions of the Grenada Revolution


Laurie R. Lambert

In 1979, the Marxist-Leninist New Jewel Movement under Maurice Bishop overthrew the government of the Caribbean island country of Grenada, establishing the People’s Revolutionary Government. The United States under President Reagan infamously invaded Grenada in 1983, staying until the New National... More


Cultural Entanglements

Langston Hughes and the Rise of African and Caribbean Literature


Shane Graham

In addition to being a poet, fiction writer, playwright, and essayist, Langston Hughes was also a globe-trotting cosmopolitan, travel writer, translator, avid international networker, and—perhaps above all—pan-Africanist. In Cultural Entanglements, Shane Graham examines Hughes’s associations with a... More


The Sacred Act of Reading

Spirituality, Performance, and Power in Afro-Diasporic Literature


Anne Margaret Castro

From Zora Neale Hurston to Derek Walcott to Toni Morrison, New World black authors have written about African-derived religious traditions and spiritual practices.  The Sacred Act of Reading examines religion and sociopolitical power in modern and contemporary texts of a variety of genres from the... More


Water Graves

The Art of the Unritual in the Greater Caribbean


Valérie Loichot

Water Graves considers representations of lives lost to water in contemporary poetry, fiction, theory, mixed media art, video production, and underwater sculptures. From sunken slave ships to the devastation of Hurricane Katrina, Valérie Loichot investigates the lack of official funeral rites in... More


Caribbean Jewish Crossings

Literary History and Creative Practice


Edited by Sarah Phillips Casteel and Heidi Kaufman

Caribbean Jewish Crossings is the first essay collection to consider the Caribbean's relationship to Jewishness through a literary lens. Although Caribbean novelists and poets regularly incorporate Jewish motifs in their work, scholars have neglected this strain in studies of Caribbean literature.... More


Mapping Hispaniola

Third Space in Dominican and Haitian Literature


Megan Jeanette Myers

Because of their respective histories of colonization and independence, the Spanish-speaking Dominican Republic has developed into the largest economy of the Caribbean, while Haiti, occupying the western side of their shared island of Hispaniola, has become one of the poorest countries in the... More


Mourning El Dorado

Literature and Extractivism in the Contemporary American Tropics


Charlotte Rogers

What ever happened to the legend of El Dorado, the tale of the mythical city of gold lost in the Amazon jungle? Charlotte Rogers argues that El Dorado has not been forgotten and still inspires the reckless pursuit of illusory wealth. The search for gold in South America during the colonial period... More


Edwidge Danticat

The Haitian Diasporic Imaginary


Nadège T. Clitandre

Haitian-American writer Edwidge Danticat is one of the most recognized writers today. Her debut novel, Breath, Eyes, Memory, was an Oprah Book Club selection, and works such as Krik? Krak! and Brother, I’m Dying have earned her a MacArthur "genius" grant and National Book Award nominations. Yet... More


Idle Talk, Deadly Talk

The Uses of Gossip in Caribbean Literature


Ana Rodríguez Navas

Chaucer called it "spiritual manslaughter"; Barthes and Benjamin deemed it dangerous linguistic nihilism. But gossip-long derided and dismissed by writers and intellectuals-is far from frivolous. In Idle Talk, Deadly Talk, Ana Rodríguez Navas reveals gossip to be an urgent, utilitarian, and deeply... More


Crossing the Line

Early Creole Novels and Anglophone Caribbean Culture in the Age of Emancipation


Candace Ward

Crossing the Line examines a group of early nineteenth-century novels by white creoles, writers whose identities and perspectives were shaped by their experiences in Britain’s Caribbean colonies. Colonial subjects residing in the West Indian colonies "beyond the line," these writers were perceived... More


Staging Creolization

Women's Theater and Performance from the French Caribbean


Emily Sahakian

In Staging Creolization, Emily Sahakian examines seven plays by Ina Césaire, Maryse Condé, Gerty Dambury, and Simone Schwarz-Bart that premiered in the French Caribbean or in France in the 1980s and 1990s and soon thereafter traveled to the United States. Sahakian argues that these late-twentieth-... More


A Cultural History of Underdevelopment

Latin America in the U.S. Imagination


John Patrick Leary

A Cultural History of Underdevelopment explores the changing place of Latin America in U.S. culture from the mid-nineteenth century to the recent U.S.-Cuba détente. In doing so, it uncovers the complex ways in which Americans have imagined the global geography of poverty and progress, as the... More


American Imperialism's Undead

The Occupation of Haiti and the Rise of Caribbean Anticolonialism


Raphael Dalleo

As modern Caribbean politics and literature emerged in the first half of the twentieth century, Haiti, as the region's first independent state, stood as a source of inspiration for imagining decolonization and rooting regional identity in Africanness. Yet at precisely the same moment that... More


The Specter of Races

Latin American Anthropology and Literature between the Wars


Anke Birkenmaier

Arguing that race has been the specter that has haunted many of the discussions about Latin American regional and national cultures today, Anke Birkenmaier shows how theories of race and culture in Latin America evolved dramatically in the period between the two world wars. In response to the rise... More


Performance and Personhood in Caribbean Literature

From Alexis to the Digital Age


Jeannine Murray-Román

Focusing on the literary representation of performance practices in anglophone, francophone, and hispanophone Caribbean literature, Jeannine Murray-Román shows how a shared regional aesthetic emerges from the descriptions of music, dance, and oral storytelling events. Because the historical... More


Tropical Apocalypse

Haiti and the Caribbean End Times


Martin Munro

In Tropical Apocalypse, Martin Munro argues that since the earliest days of European colonization, Caribbean—and especially Haitian—history has been shaped by apocalyptic events so that the region has, in effect, been living for centuries in an end time without end. By engaging with the... More


Market Aesthetics

The Purchase of the Past in Caribbean Diasporic Fiction


Elena Machado Sáez

In Market Aesthetics, Elena Machado Sáez explores the popularity of Caribbean diasporic writing within an interdisciplinary, comparative, and pan-ethnic framework. She contests established readings of authors such as Junot Díaz, Julia Alvarez, Edwidge Danticat, and Robert Antoni while showcasing... More


Eric Williams and the Anticolonial Tradition

The Making of a Diasporan Intellectual


Maurice St. Pierre

A leader in the social movement that achieved Trinidad and Tobago’s independence from Britain in 1962, Eric Williams (1911–1981) served as its first prime minister. Although much has been written about Williams as a historian and a politician, Maurice St. Pierre is the first to offer a full-length... More


The Pan American Imagination

Contested Visions of the Hemisphere in Twentieth-Century Literature


Stephen M. Park

In the history of the early twentieth-century Americas, visions of hemispheric unity flourished, and the notion of a transnational American identity was embraced by artists, intellectuals, and government institutions. In The Pan American Imagination, Stephen Park explores the work of several Pan... More


Journeys of the Slave Narrative in the Early Americas



Edited by Nicole N. Aljoe and Ian Finseth

Focusing on slave narratives from the Atlantic world of the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, this interdisciplinary collection of essays suggests the importance—even the necessity—of looking beyond the iconic and ubiquitous works of Olaudah Equiano, Frederick Douglass, and Harriet Jacobs... More


Locating the Destitute

Space and Identity in Caribbean Fiction


Stanka Radović

While postcolonial discourse in the Caribbean has drawn attention to colonialism’s impact on space and spatial hierarchy, Stanka Radović asks both how ordinary people as "users" of space have been excluded from active and autonomous participation in shaping their daily spatial reality and how they... More


Bodies and Bones

Feminist Rehearsal and Imagining Caribbean Belonging


Tanya L. Shields

In Bodies and Bones, Tanya Shields argues that a repeated engagement with the Caribbean’s iconic and historic touchstones offers a new sense of (inter)national belonging that brings an alternative and dynamic vision to the gendered legacy of brutality against black bodies, flesh, and bone. Using a... More


Sounding the Break

African American and Caribbean Routes of World Literature


Jason Frydman

The idea of "world literature" has served as a crucial though underappreciated interlocutor for African diasporic writers, informing their involvement in processes of circulation, translation, and revision that have been identified as the hallmarks of the contemporary era of world literature. Yet... More


The Haitian Revolution in the Literary Imagination

Radical Horizons, Conservative Constraints


Philip James Kaisary

The Haitian Revolution (1791–1804) reshaped the debates about slavery and freedom throughout the Atlantic world, accelerated the abolitionist movement, precipitated rebellions in neighboring territories, and intensified both repression and antislavery sentiment. The story of the birth of the world’... More


The Cross-Dressed Caribbean

Writing, Politics, Sexualities


Edited by Maria Cristina Fumagalli, Bénédicte Ledent, and Roberto del Valle Alcalá

Studies of sexuality in Caribbean culture are on the rise, focusing mainly on homosexuality and homophobia or on regional manifestations of normative and nonnormative sexualities. The Cross-Dressed Caribbean extends this exploration by using the trope of transvestism not only to analyze texts and... More


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