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Peculiar Bodies: Stories and Histories

Questioning the body as the historical subject of experiences “peculiar” to it, this series examines the myriad forms of the body—healthy, diseased, athletic, crippled, alluring, pious—across all disciplines, periods, and geographic contexts. The series embraces a range of historical, literary, and philosophical methodologies and theories around the idea of “the body.”

Series Editors: Carolyn Day, Chris Mounsey, Wendy J. Turner
UVAP Editor: Angie Hogan


Sapphic Crossings
Cross-Dressing Women in Eighteenth-Century British Literature Ula Lukszo Klein

Across the eighteenth century in Britain, readers, writers, and theater-goers were fascinated by women who dressed in men’s clothing—from actresses on stage who showed their shapely legs to advantage in men’s breeches to stories of valiant female soldiers and ruthless female pirates. Spanning... More


Sight Correction
Vision and Blindness in Eighteenth-Century Britain Chris Mounsey

The debut publication in a new series devoted to the body as an object of historical study,  Sight Correction provides an expansive analysis of blindness in eighteenth-century Britain, developing a new methodology for conceptualizing sight impairment. Beginning with a reconsideration of the place... More