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Architecture


Analogy and Design



Andrea Ponsi. Translated by Antony Shugaar

Analogical thought is fundamental to creativity. The use of analogy can help to solve problems, make connections between disciplines, and use those relations to form original solutions.In Analogy and Design, Andrea Ponsi considers the role of analogical thought in architectural design. Almost all... More


Detached America

Building Houses in Postwar Suburbia


James A. Jacobs

During the quarter century between 1945 and 1970, Americans crafted a new manner of living that shaped and reshaped how residential builders designed and marketed millions of detached single-family suburban houses. The modest two- and three-bedroom houses built immediately following the war gave... More


Buildings of North Dakota



Steve C. Martens and Ronald H. L. M. Ramsay

For many people outside the state, North Dakota conjures visions of a remote, sparse, and seemingly inhospitable landscape, replete with ghost towns, scattered farmsteads, and settings reminiscent of the movie Fargo. Yet beyond this facile image lies a spectacular array of high-style, vernacular,... More


The Oglethorpe Plan

Enlightenment Design in Savannah and Beyond


Thomas D. Wilson

The statesman and reformer James Oglethorpe was a significant figure in the philosophical and political landscape of eighteenth-century British America. His social contributions—all informed by Enlightenment ideals—included prison reform, the founding of the Georgia Colony on behalf of the "worthy... More


San Francisco

A Map of Perceptions


Andrea Ponsi

San Francisco is a city designed for artists and wanderers. From North Beach, to Chinatown, to the cold, rough surf of Ocean Beach, to Marin, both visitors and lifelong residents have endless opportunities to explore new neighborhoods, buildings, environments, and cultures just by getting in the... More


Buildings of Virginia

Valley, Piedmont, Southside, and Southwest


Anne Carter Lee. With Contributors

Virginia is as much a state of mind as a set of geographical boundaries. Its western terrain encompasses dramatically beautiful mountaintops and scrubby lowlands, luxuriantly rich terrain, and rocky, almost untillable land. The green forests, rich loam, red clay, and sandy soil attracted waves of... More


Frank Lloyd Wright

Preservation, Design, and Adding to Iconic Buildings


Edited by Richard Longstreth

The buildings of Frank Lloyd Wright are not immune to the social and environmental forces that affect all architecture. Because of the popular recognition and historical significance of his work, however, the stakes are unusually high when his buildings are modified in any way. Any additions or... More


Frank Lloyd Wright's Pope-Leighey House



Steven M. Reiss

Frank Lloyd Wright designed and realized over 500 buildings between 1886 and 1959 for a wide range of clients. In Frank Lloyd Wright's Pope-Leighey House, architect Steven M. Reiss presents the updated and detailed story of one of Wright’s few Virginia commissions. Designed and built for Loren and... More


After the Deluge

Reimagining Leonardo's Legacy


Edited by Kim Tanzer

After the Deluge serves as a demonstration of the practical imagination applied to the ecology of water. Taking Leonardo da Vinci’s "deluge" drawings of catastrophic floods as its starting point, and inspired by his lifelong study of all aspects of water, the dialogues in this book gather together... More


Architecture as Medicine

The UF Health Shands Cancer Hospital, A Case Study


Reuben M. Rainey and Alana K. Schrader

Rainey and Schrader explore an innovative University of Florida cancer hospital, focusing on its many patient-centered design features as well as the sophisticated planning process and construction management strategy involved in its realization. This generously illustrated volume will interest... More


Buildings of Vermont



Glenn M. Andres and Curtis B. Johnson

Most picture Vermont with handsome barns overlooking rolling pastures, white country churches punctuating hillsides of blazing maples, and small villages clustered around gracious greens. While not inaccurate, this image does little justice to the architectural richness of a state that retains so... More


Commemoration in America

Essays on Monuments, Memorialization, and Memory


Edited by David Gobel and Daves Rossell

Commemoration lies at the poetic, historiographic, and social heart of human community. It is how societies define themselves and is central to the institution of the city. Addressing the complex ways that monuments in the United States have been imagined, created, and perceived from the colonial... More


"The Most Segregated City in America"

City Planning and Civil Rights in Birmingham, 1920–1980


Charles E. Connerly

One of Planetizen’s Top Ten Books of 2006"But for Birmingham," Fred Shuttleworth recalled President John F. Kennedy saying in June 1963 when he invited black leaders to meet with him, "we would not be here today." Birmingham is well known for its civil rights history, particularly for the violent... More


Visuality for Architects

Architectural Creativity and Modern Theories of Perception and Imagination


Branko Mitrovic

What is more important in architectural works—their form, shape, and color, or the meanings and symbolism that can be associated with them? Can aesthetic judgments of architecture be independent of the stories one can tell about buildings? Do non-architects perceive buildings in the same way as do... More


Buildings of Michigan



Kathryn Bishop Eckert

This revised edition of Buildings of Michigan (first published in 1993) presents the architecture of the Upper and Lower peninsulas of Michigan, which are surrounded by four of the Great Lakes. From the Greek, Gothic, Italianate, Queen Anne, and Richardsonian Romanesque structures of the nineteenth... More


Sustainable, Affordable, Prefab

The ecoMOD Project


John D. Quale

Sustainable Affordable Prefab combines architectural theory and practice in a beautifully illustrated account of ecoMOD, the innovative design/build program pioneered by John Quale. Unlike most manifestos of green design, Quale's book describes a collaborative process that has produced, to date,... More


Essays in Early American Architectural History

A View from the Chesapeake


Carl R. Lounsbury

The essays in this collection represent the type of research that has reshaped our understanding of early American architecture over the past thirty years. Carl R. Lounsbury, three-time winner of the prestigious Abbott Lowell Cummings Award offered by the Vernacular Architecture Forum, traces the... More


Florence

A Map of Perceptions


Andrea Ponsi

Many years have passed since architect Andrea Ponsi settled in Florence, and still he feels he does not fully comprehend this mysterious city. The way Florence eludes understanding, however, can be an opportunity--to keep seeking, to keep exploring. Ponsi’s Florence is endlessly suggestive. His... More


At Home with Apartheid

The Hidden Landscapes of Domestic Service in Johannesburg


Rebecca Ginsburg

Despite their peaceful, bucolic appearance, the tree-lined streets of South African suburbia were no refuge from the racial tensions and indignities of apartheid’s most repressive years. In At Home with Apartheid, Rebecca Ginsburg provides an intimate examination of the cultural landscapes of... More


Buildings of Hawaii



Don J. Hibbard

With elegance and authority, Buildings of Hawaii presents the architecture of the six major islands in the Hawaii chain. Don J. Hibbard delves into the development of the state’s distinct blending of the building traditions of the East and West within a subtropical island context. The first in-... More


Buildings of Pennsylvania

Philadelphia and Eastern Pennsylvania


George E. Thomas. with Patricia Ricci, J. Bruce Thomas, Robert Janosov, Larry Newman, and Richard J. Webster

This latest volume in the Society of Architectural Historians’ Buildings of the United States series follows the Pennsylvania migration narrative in broad swathes: Philadelphia and its surrounding counties of the original Quaker settlement zone, the Piedmont and the German agricultural zone, the... More


Mirrors of Memory

Culture, Politics, and Time in Paris and Tokyo


James W. White

As society becomes more global, many see the world’s great cities as becoming increasingly similar. But while contemporary cultures do depend on and resemble each other in previously unimagined ways, homogenization is sometimes overestimated. In his compelling new book, James W. White considers how... More


The Food Axis

Cooking, Eating, and the Architecture of American Houses


Elizabeth Cromley

Blending architectural and social history with the necessity—and the passion—for food, this engaging new book attempts to understand the development of the American house by viewing it through one very specific lens: the food axis. Taking in far more than the kitchen, author Elizabeth Collins... More


Carolina Cottage

A Personal History of the Piazza House


Margaret Ruth Little

Margaret Ruth Little’s new book is a celebration and a history of one of the most recognizable vernacular house types in the Upper South, the Carolina cottage. The one-and-one-half-story side-gabled cottage—with its most distinctive feature, an integral front porch known as a piazza—offers not only... More


Buildings of Pennsylvania

Pittsburgh and Western Pennsylvania


Lu Donnelly, H. David Brumble IV, and Franklin Toker

Buildings of Pennsylvania: Pittsburgh and Western Pennsylvania considers the architecture, landscape, and town plans of thirty-one counties west of Blue Mountain and north to Lake Erie, including cities and communities big and small, from Pittsburgh, Beaver Falls, Johnstown, and Altoona to... More


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