You are here

Architecture


Thomas Jefferson's Academical Village

The Creation of an Architectural Masterpiece


Richard Guy Wilson

Thomas Jefferson's design for the University of Virginia is widely hailed as a masterpiece. It is his greatest architectural accomplishment, the summation of his quest for intellectual freedom. The story of the University encompasses the political and architectural worlds, as Jeffeson struggled... More


Buildings of Delaware



W. Barksdale Maynard

The latest volume in the Society of Architectural Historians' prestigious Buildings of the United States series, Buildings of Delaware is the first book to document the state's architectural history from all periods. Extensively illustrated with photographs and maps, and supplemented by a glossary... More


The Hand and the Soul

Aesthetics and Ethics in Architecture and Art


Sanda Iliescu, ed.

The essays in The Hand and the Soul explore the question of how ethical ideas guiding the design process--a concern for the environment or for social justice--relate to the beauty of our buildings, cities, and artworks. The book presents a range of viewpoints and does not ignore the perils of an... More


Buildings of Massachusetts

Metropolitan Boston


Keith Morgan, Richard M. Candee, Naomi Miller, and Roger G. Reed

This latest volume in the Society of Architectural Historians’ Buildings of the United States series analyzes the architecture, landscape, and planning patterns of the capital of Massachusetts and forty surrounding cities and towns that fan out from Boston Harbor. The term "metropolitan" here... More


Train Time

Railroads and the Imminent Reshaping of the United States Landscape


John R. Stilgoe

Unlike many United States industries, railroads are intrinsically linked to American soil and particular regions. Yet few Americans pay attention to rail lines, even though millions of them live in an economy and culture "waiting for the train." In Train Time: Railroads and the Imminent Reshaping... More


Prodigy Houses of Virginia

Architecture and the Native Elite


Barbara Burlison Mooney

In a list of objectives and inquiries meant to guide and make profitable the European travel of two young Americans in 1788, Thomas Jefferson noted, "Architecture [is] worth great attention. As we double our numbers ever 20 years we must double our houses.... It is then among the most important... More


Building After Katrina

Visions for the Gulf Coast


Betsy Roettger, ed.

After the devastation caused by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in the fall of 2005, entire towns, neighborhoods, and ecologies were destroyed. What remains is a complex web of social, economic, environmental, and cultural issues that demand new strategies for inhabiting this land. During the spring... More


The Thomas Jefferson Foundation Medal in Architecture

The First Forty Years (1966-2005)


UVA - School of Architecture. Edited by Jayne Riew, Lydia Mattice Brandt, and Karen Van Lengen. With an introduction by Garry Wills

The Thomas Jefferson Foundation Medal in Architecture is one of the most prestigious honors awarded in the discipline of architecture and its related fields, arising from the unique environment afforded by Jefferson’s design for the University of Virginia. Since 1966, the medal has recognized the... More


Buildings of Pittsburgh



Franklin Toker

At the forefront of national and international change, Pittsburgh has long been portrayed as a place for innovative architecture. From its origins as a fort built in 1753 at the urging of a twenty-one-year-old George Washington, through its industrial boom, and into contemporary times, when it has... More


The Last Undiscovered Place



David K. Leff

With warmth and a keen eye for the nuances of history and place, David K. Leff offers this affectionate, insightful portrait of his adopted home of Collinsville, Connecticut, a village that looked perfectly ordinary until he fell prey to its rhythms and charm. The town taught him a new way of... More


East 40 Degrees

An Interpretive Atlas


Jack Williams

The Appalachian mountain chain once contained the highest and most dramatic mountains on earth. Worn down over time, these mountains still hold some of the most diverse climactic zones and singular geological formations in existence. In East 40 Degrees: An Interpretive Atlas, Jack Williams examines... More


Southern Built

American Architecture, Regional Practice


Catherine W. Bishir

A leader in the fields of both regional architectural history and historic preservation, Catherine Bishir has collected essays covering three decades into one volume. Just as the subjects of her studies are at once regional and national, the essays included here seek to think globally while... More


Re-creating the American Past

Essays on the Colonial Revival


Richard Guy Wilson and Shaun Eyring, eds.

Although individually and collectively Americans have many histories, the dominant view of our national past focuses on the colonial era. The reasons for this are many and complex, touching on stories of the country's origins and of the founding fathers, the privileged position in history granted... More


Trojan Goat

A Self-Sufficient House


John D. Quale. Distributed for the University of Virginia School of Architecture

The first volume in the Urgent Matters series, Trojan Goat: A Self-Sufficient House traces the design and construction of the University of Virginia’s whimsically named, award-winning entry in the 2002 U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon. John D. Quale, the architectural advisor and... More


Lots of Parking

Land Use in a Car Culture


John A. Jakle and Keith A. Sculle

When the automobile was first introduced, few Americans predicted its fundamental impact, not only on how people would travel, but on the American landscape itself. Instead of reducing the amount of wheeled transport on public roads, the advent of mass-produced cars caused congestion, at the curb... More


The Courthouses of Early Virginia

An Architectural History


Carl R. Lounsbury

Court day in early Virginia transformed crossroads towns into forums for citizens of all social classes to transact a variety of business, from legal cases heard before the county magistrates to horse races, ballgames, and the sale and barter of produce, clothing, food, and drink. As marketplace,... More


Homeplace

The Social Use and Meaning of the Folk Dwelling in Southwestern North Carolina


Michael Ann Williams

Challenging many of the methods and preconceptions of conventional folk-architecture studies, Homeplace examines traditional houses in the mountains of Appalachia from the perspective offered by oral histories. Michael Ann Williams bases much of her study on interviews with some of the people most... More


The Architecture of Jefferson Country

Charlottesville and Albemarle County, Virginia


K. Edward Lay

The great architectural significance of Albemarle County and Charlottesville, Virginia, rests, not surprisingly, on the continuing influence of Thomas Jefferson. Not only did Jefferson design the State Capitol in Richmond, his home Monticello, his country retreat Poplar Forest, and the University... More


An Illustrated Glossary of Early Southern Architecture and Landscape



Carl R. Lounsbury, ed.

Covering the full range of building in the South from 1607 to the 1820s, An Illustrated Glossary of Early Southern Architecture and Landscape is now available for the first time in paperback. This unique and exhaustive compilation traces the origin and development of an American architectural... More


Historic Preservation

Curatorial Management of the Built World


James Marston Fitch

This book outlines a complete programme for the restoration and preservation of historic structures and historic sites throughout the world. It is a basic text for both the novice entering the field and the specialist. Dr Fitch covers the many disciplines, concepts and technologies needed by the... More


Pages