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Early Republic


First and Always

A New Portrait of George Washington Peter R. Henriques

George Washington may be the most famous American who ever lived, and certainly is one of the most admired. While surrounded by myths, it is no myth that the man who led Americans’ fight for independence and whose two terms in office largely defined the presidency was the most highly respected... More


Yuletide in Dixie

Slavery, Christmas, and Southern Memory Robert E. May

How did enslaved African Americans in the Old South really experience Christmas? Did Christmastime provide slaves with a lengthy and jubilant respite from labor and the whip, as is generally assumed, or is the story far more complex and troubling? In this provocative, revisionist, and sometimes... More


Conceived in Crisis

The Revolutionary Creation of an American State Christopher R. Pearl

Conceived in Crisis argues that the American Revolution was not just the product of the Imperial Crisis, brought on by Parliament’s attempt to impose a new idea of empire on the American colonies. To an equal or greater degree, it was a response to the inability of individual colonial governments... More


The Papers of George Washington

22 September 1796-3 March 1797 George Washington. Edited by Adrina Garbooshian-Huggins

The concluding volume of the Presidential Series begins following the publication of Washington’s Farewell Address, which was circulated widely in newspapers and drew reactions from citizens across the nation. With his approaching retirement from the presidency, Washington tended to a number of... More


The Papers of James Madison

1 May 1816-3 March 1817, with a supplement, 1809-1815 James Madison. Edited by J. C. A. Stagg, Mary Parke Johnson, Katharine E. Harbury, and Anne Mandeville Colony

The final volume of the Presidential Series covers Madison’s last ten months in office, during which he maintained a busy schedule despite taking the longest summer vacation in all his time in Washington. Foreign policy was dominated by crises with Spain and Algiers. Negotiations with Great Britain... More


The Correspondence of Thomas Hutchinson

1767-1769 Thomas Hutchinson. Edited by John W. Tyler and Elizabeth Dubrulle

The second volume of Thomas Hutchinson’s correspondence covers the years 1767 through 1769. In 1767, Charles Townshend's new taxes, in addition to his ambitious plans to improve customs enforcement and render crown officials in the colonies more independent of local assemblies, caused increasing... More


The Papers of George Washington
Revolutionary War Series, Volume 27
5 July-27 August 1780 George Washington and Benjamin L. Huggins

Three major themes dominate George Washington’s correspondence in volume 27 of the Revolutionary War Series: the arrival of a French expeditionary army and navy, the urgent need to prepare the Continental army for a joint Franco-American offensive to take New York City, and the cultivation of... More


Redemption from Tyranny

Herman Husband's American Revolution Bruce E. Stewart

For many common people, the American Revolution offered an opportunity to radically reimagine the wealth and power structures in the nascent United States. Yet in the eyes of working-class activists, the U.S. Constitution favored the interests of a corrupt elite and betrayed the lofty principles of... More


The Papers of George Washington

1 April-21 September 1796 George Washington. Edited by David R. Hoth and William M. Ferraro

Throughout volume 20 of the Presidential Series, George Washington looked forward to retirement from public life, preparing a farewell address to announce his intention and leave behind guiding principles for the nation. Relations with Great Britain and France dominated foreign policy, as the House... More


Jeffersonians in Power

The Rhetoric of Opposition Meets the Realities of Governing Edited by Joanne B. Freeman and Johann N. Neem

In the 1790s, the Jeffersonian Republicans were the party of "no." They opposed attempts to expand the government’s role in society, criticized the Washington administration’s national bank, railed against a standing army, and bemoaned the spirit of the Federalist regime, which, they claimed,... More


The Founding of Thomas Jefferson's University

Edited by John A. Ragosta, Peter S. Onuf, and Andrew J. O’Shaughnessy

Established in 1819 by Thomas Jefferson, the University of Virginia was known as "The University" throughout the South for most of the nineteenth century, and today it stands as one of the premier universities in the world. This volume provides an in-depth look at the founding of the University and... More


Thomas Jefferson's Lives

Biographers and the Battle for History Edited by Robert M. S. McDonald

Who was the "real" Thomas Jefferson? If this question has an answer, it will probably not be revealed reading the many accounts of his life. For two centuries biographers have provided divergent perspectives on him as a man and conflicting appraisals of his accomplishments. Jefferson was... More


Establishing Religious Freedom

Jefferson's Statute in Virginia Thomas E. Buckley

The significance of the Virginia Statute for Establishing Religious Freedom goes far beyond the borders of the Old Dominion. Its influence ultimately extended to the Supreme Court’s interpretation of the separation of church and state. In his latest book, Thomas Buckley tells the story of the... More


Educated in Tyranny

Slavery at Thomas Jefferson’s University Edited by Maurie D. McInnis and Louis P. Nelson

From the University of Virginia’s very inception, slavery was deeply woven into its fabric. Enslaved people first helped to construct and then later lived in the Academical Village; they raised and prepared food, washed clothes, cleaned privies, and chopped wood. They maintained the buildings,... More


The Insurgent Delegate

Selected Letters and Other Writings of George Thatcher Edited by William C. diGiacomantonio

George Thatcher served as a U.S. representative from Maine throughout the Federalist Era (1789-1801)—the most critical and formative period of American constitutional history. A moderate on most political issues, the Cape Cod native and Harvard-educated lawyer proved a maverick in matters relating... More


"The Only Unavoidable Subject of Regret"

George Washington, Slavery, and the Enslaved Community at Mount Vernon Mary V. Thompson

George Washington’s life has been scrutinized by historians over the past three centuries, but the day-to-day lives of Mount Vernon’s enslaved workers, who left few written records but made up 90 percent of the estate’s population, have been largely left out of the story.In "The Only Unavoidable... More


The Papers of James Madison

13 October 1815-30 April 1816 James Madison. Edited by Angela Kreider, J. C. A. Stagg, Mary Parke Johnson, Katharine E. Harbury, and Anne Mandeville Colony

The tenth volume of the Presidential Series covers the period from Madison’s return to Washington from Montpelier in October 1815 to the publication of the incendiary letters of the pseudonymous "Americanus" throughout April 1816. In the months between, Madison fielded requests for support from... More


Preserving the White Man's Republic

Jacksonian Democracy, Race, and the Transformation of American Conservatism Joshua A. Lynn

In Preserving the White Man’s Republic, Joshua Lynn reveals how the national Democratic Party rebranded majoritarian democracy and liberal individualism as conservative means for white men in the South and North to preserve their mastery on the eve of the Civil War.Responding to fears of African... More


George Washington and Native Americans

"Learn Our Arts and Ways of Life" Richard Harless

George Washington had contact with Native Americans throughout most of his life. His first encounter as a teenager left him with the impression that they were nothing more than an "ignorant people." As a young man he fought both alongside and against Native Americans during the French and Indian... More


The Papers of George Washington
Revolutionary War Series, Volume 26
13 May–4 July 1780 George Washington. Edited by Benjamin L. Huggins and Adrina Garbooshian-Huggins

With volume 26 of the Revolutionary War Series, Gen. George Washington and his troops transition from the more static affairs of winter encampment to active operations that would include two battles against the British. Throughout the volume, logistics and recruiting dominate Washington’s... More


Patriotism and Piety

Federalist Politics and Religious Struggle in the New American Nation Jonathan J. Den Hartog

In Patriotism and Piety, Jonathan Den Hartog argues that the question of how religion would function in American society was decided in the decades after the Constitution and First Amendment established a legal framework. Den Hartog shows that among the wide array of politicians and public figures... More


The Queen of America

Mary Cutts's Life of Dolley Madison Mary Cutts. Edited by Catherine Allgor. Foreword by Cokie Roberts

For biographers and fans of Dolley Payne Todd Madison, Mary Cutts's memoir of her famous aunt has been indispensable. Because Madison left behind no account of her life, the common assumption has been that Cutts’s account is the closest we have to Madison's autobiographical voice. With this new,... More


George Washington's Barbados Diary, 1751-52

George Washington. Edited by Alicia K. Anderson and Lynn A. Price

In the autumn of 1751, at the age of nineteen, George Washington sailed with his older half-brother Lawrence from Virginia to the Caribbean island of Barbados—the one and only time that the future Revolutionary War hero and president would leave the shores of continental North America. Lawrence had... More


The Papers of Robert Treat Paine, 1778-1786

Robert Treat Paine. Edited by Edward W. Hanson

The fourth volume of this series encompasses Robert Treat Paine’s time as Massachusetts attorney general. Paine, best known as a signer of the Declaration of Independence, spent the remainder of his public career in state service. The documents in this volume highlight the quest for order in a... More


Becoming Men of Some Consequence

Youth and Military Service in the Revolutionary War John A. Ruddiman

Young Continental soldiers carried a heavy burden in the American Revolution. Their experiences of coming of age during the upheavals of war provide a novel perspective on the Revolutionary era, eliciting questions of gender, family life, economic goals, and politics. "Going for a soldier" forced... More


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