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Understanding the American Revolution

Issues and Actors
Jack P. Greene
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BUY Cloth · 401 pp. · 6 × 9 · ISBN 9780813916088 · $75.00 · Nov 1995
BUY Paper · 401 pp. · 6 × 9 · ISBN 9780813916095 · $39.50 · Nov 1995

This volume brings together sixteen essays on the American Revolution by leading historian Jack Greene. Originally published between 1972 and the early nineties, these essays approach the Revolution as an episode in British imperial history rather than as the first step in the creation of an American nation.

In Understanding the American Revolution, Greene explores such problems as Virginia's political behavior during the Revolutionary era; the roles of three cultural brokers, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Paine, and Philip Mazzei; and why the Revolution had such a short half-life as a model for large-scale revolutions. He explores the colonial roots of the political structures that Revolutionary leaders created, and he asks why the American Revolution was not more radical.

About the Author(s): 

Jack P. Greene is Andrew W. Mellon Professor in the Humanities at The Johns Hopkins University. He has published extensively, and his books include Peripheries and Center: Constitutional Development in the Extended Polities of the British Empire and the United States, 1607-1783; Landon Carter: An Inquiry into the Personal Values and Social Imperatives of the Eighteenth-Century Virginia Gentry and Pursuits of Happiness: The Social Development of the Early Modern British Colonies and the Formation of American Culture.

 
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