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Political Science


Creating Constitutional Change
Clashes over Power and Liberty in the Supreme Court

Gregg Ivers and Kevin T. McGuire, eds.

Because the justices of the U.S. Supreme Court tell us what the Constitution means, they can create constitutional change. For quite some time, general readers who have been interested in understanding those changes have not had a concise volume that explores major decisions in which those changes... More


The Bill of Rights, The Courts, and the Law


David Bearinger, ed.

The Bill of Rights, perhaps the single most important document in American history, has provided a strong and remarkably durable framework in which the limits of government, the scope of individual liberty, and the nature of our democratic system have been defined for more than two hundred years.... More


Judicial Independence in the Age of Democracy
Critical Perspectives from around the World

Peter H. Russell and David M. O'Brien, eds.

This collection of essays by leading scholars of constitutional law looks at a critical component of constitutional democracy--judicial independence--from an international comparative perspective. Peter H. Russell's introduction outlines a general theory of judicial independence, while the... More


Legacies of the 1964 Civil Rights Act


Bernard Grofman, ed.

The 1964 Civil Rights Act, in conjunction with the Voting Rights Act of the following year, totally transformed the shape of American race relations. Supporters of the Civil Rights Act sought, at minimum, the elimination of racial segregation in publicly supported schools, hospitals, public... More


The State against the Peasantry
Rural Struggles in Colonial and Postcolonial Mozambique

Merle L. Bowen

In 1975, the Front for the Liberation of Mozambique (Frelimo) led the country to independence after a ten-year guerilla war against Portuguese colonial rule. Peasants were essential to the victory, but once in power Frelimo evolved from a popular liberation movement into a bureaucratic one-party... More


Power versus Liberty
Madison, Hamilton, Wilson, and Jefferson

James H. Read

Does every increase in the power of government entail a loss of liberty for the people? James H. Read examines how four key Founders--James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, James Wilson, and Thomas Jefferson--wrestled with this question during the first two decades of the American Republic.Power versus... More


Counting on the Latino Vote
Latinos as a New Electorate

Louis DeSipio

Latinos, along with other new immigrants, are not being incorporated into U.S. politics as rapidly as their predecessors, raising concerns about political fragmentation along ethnic lines. In Counting on the Latino Vote, Louis DeSipio uses the first national studies of Latinos to investigate... More


The Modernity of Witchcraft
Politics and the Occult in Postcolonial Africa

Peter Geschiere. Translated by Janet Roitman and Peter Geschiere

To many Westerners, the disappearance of African traditions of witchcraft might seem inevitable wuth continued modernization. In The Modernity of Witchcraft, Peter Geschieres uses his own experiences among the Maka and in other parts of eastern and southern Cameroon, as well as other... More


Imagining Miami
Ethnic Politics in a Postmodern World

Sheila L. Croucher

Miami has long captured the world's attention in provocative ways. During the 1980s, a series of violent racial disturbances focused national and international attention there as analysts and observers scrambled to explain the demise of the "Magic City." What has emerged is a popular image of Miami... More


Dividing The Commons
Politics, Policy, and Culture in Botswana

Pauline E. Peters

Pauline E. Peters shows how Africa's current grazing-land policy, like the water-development policies of the 1930s, is part of a historical process through which resources are allocated, wealth created or destroyed, and some interests promoted at the cost of others. At the heart of the dividing of... More


Political Development and the New Realism in Sub-Saharan Africa


David E. Apter and Carl G. Rosberg, eds.

Since the 1950s David Apter and Carl Rosenberg have been among the leading American scholars in African Studies. In this volume they, along with other major specialists in the field, explore the new configurations of African politics.With tentative efforts at a revival of democracy now taking place... More


The Moral Foundations of the American Republic


Robert H. Horwitz

Contributors:Joseph Cropsey * Benjamin R. Barber * Richard Hofstadter * Martin Diamond * Gordon S. Wood * Robert A. Goldwin * Wilson Carey McWilliams * Robert A. Dahl * James Ceaser * Walter Berns * Herbert J. Storing * Will Morrisey * Michael P. Zuckert


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