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Caribbean & African Literature


The Mambi-Land, or Adventures of a Herald Correspondent in Cuba
A Critical Edition James J. O'Kelly. Edited by Jennifer Brittan

In late 1872, the New York Herald named James J. O’Kelly its special correspondent to Cuba, to cover what would later be known as the Ten Years’ War. O’Kelly was tasked with crossing Spanish lines, locating the insurgent camps, and interviewing the president of the Cuban republic, Carlos Manuel de... More


Haitian Revolutionary Fictions
An Anthology Edited and with translations by Marlene L. Daut, Grégory Pierrot, and Marion C. Rohrleitner.

The Haitian Revolution (1791–1804) was the first antislavery and anticolonial uprising led by New World Africans to result in the creation of an independent and slavery-free nation state. The momentousness of this thirteen-year-long war generated thousands of pages of writing. This anthology brings... More


Fictions of Whiteness
Imagining the Planter Caste in the French Caribbean Novel Maeve McCusker

The Antilles remain a society preoccupied with gradations of skin color and with the social hierarchies that largely reflect, or are determined by, racial identity. Yet Francophone Postcolonial studies have largely overlooked a key figure in plantation literature: the béké, the white Creole... More


The Sun of Jesús del Monte
A Cuban Antislavery Novel Andrés Avelino de Orihuela. Translated and edited by David Luis-Brown

Translated into English for the first time, Andrés Avelino de Orihuela’s El Sol de Jesús del Monte is a landmark Cuban antislavery novel. Published originally in 1852, the same year as Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin (which Orihuela had translated into Spanish), it provides an... More


Rum Histories
Drinking in Atlantic Literature and Culture Jennifer Poulos Nesbitt

When you drink rum, you drink history. More than merely a popular spirit in the transatlantic, rum became a cultural symbol of the Caribbean. While often dismissed as set dressing in texts about the region, the historical and moral associations of alcohol generally—and rum specifically—cue powerful... More


Imperial Educación
Race and Republican Motherhood in the Nineteenth-Century Americas Thomas Genova

In the long nineteenth century, Argentine and Cuban reformers invited white women from the United States to train teachers as replacements for their countries’ supposedly unfit mothers. Imperial Educación examines representations of mixed-race Afro-descended mothers in literary and educational... More


The Quebec Connection
A Poetics of Solidarity in Global Francophone Literatures Julie-Françoise Tolliver

From the 1950s to the 1970s, the idea of independence inspired radical changes across the French-speaking world. In The Quebec Connection, Julie-Françoise Tolliver examines the links and parallels that writers from Quebec, the Caribbean, and Africa imagined to unite that world, illuminating the... More


Humus
Fabienne Kanor. Translated by Lynn E. Palermo

While researching in Nantes, a port city enriched by the slave trade, celebrated French novelist Fabienne Kanor came across a chilling report written in 1774 by the commander of a slave ship, Le Soleil. Captain Louis Mosnier recounted the loss of valuable "cargo" when fourteen African women escaped... More


Comrade Sister
Caribbean Feminist Revisions of the Grenada Revolution Laurie R. Lambert

In 1979, the Marxist-Leninist New Jewel Movement under Maurice Bishop overthrew the government of the Caribbean island country of Grenada, establishing the People’s Revolutionary Government. The United States under President Reagan infamously invaded Grenada in 1983, staying until the New National... More


The Belle Créole
Maryse Condé. Translated by Nicole Simek. Afterword by Dawn Fulton

Possessing one of the most vital voices in international letters, Maryse Condé added to an already acclaimed career the New Academy Prize in Literature in 2018. The twelfth novel by this celebrated author revolves around an enigmatic crime and the young man at its center. Dieudonné Sabrina, a... More


Water Graves
The Art of the Unritual in the Greater Caribbean Valérie Loichot

Water Graves considers representations of lives lost to water in contemporary poetry, fiction, theory, mixed-media art, video production, and underwater sculptures. From sunken slave ships to the devastation of Hurricane Katrina, Valérie Loichot investigates the lack of official funeral rites in... More


The Sacred Act of Reading
Spirituality, Performance, and Power in Afro-Diasporic Literature Anne Margaret Castro

From Zora Neale Hurston to Derek Walcott to Toni Morrison, New World black authors have written about African-derived religious traditions and spiritual practices.  The Sacred Act of Reading examines religion and sociopolitical power in modern and contemporary texts of a variety of genres from the... More


Caribbean Jewish Crossings
Literary History and Creative Practice Edited by Sarah Phillips Casteel and Heidi Kaufman

Caribbean Jewish Crossings is the first essay collection to consider the Caribbean's relationship to Jewishness through a literary lens. Although Caribbean novelists and poets regularly incorporate Jewish motifs in their work, scholars have neglected this strain in studies of Caribbean literature.... More


Mapping Hispaniola
Third Space in Dominican and Haitian Literature Megan Jeanette Myers

Because of their respective histories of colonization and independence, the Spanish-speaking Dominican Republic has developed into the largest economy of the Caribbean, while Haiti, occupying the western side of their shared island of Hispaniola, has become one of the poorest countries in the... More


Edwidge Danticat
The Haitian Diasporic Imaginary Nadège T. Clitandre

Haitian-American writer Edwidge Danticat is one of the most recognized writers today. Her debut novel, Breath, Eyes, Memory, was an Oprah Book Club selection, and works such as Krik? Krak! and Brother, I’m Dying have earned her a MacArthur "genius" grant and National Book Award nominations. Yet... More


Dézafi
Frankétienne. Translated by Asselin Charles. Afterword by Jean Jonassaint

Dézafi is no ordinary zombie novel. In the hands of the great Haitian author known simply as Frankétienne, zombification takes on a symbolic dimension that stands as a potent commentary on a country haunted by a history of slavery. Now this dynamic new translation brings this touchstone in Haitian... More


Idle Talk, Deadly Talk
The Uses of Gossip in Caribbean Literature Ana Rodríguez Navas

Chaucer called it "spiritual manslaughter"; Barthes and Benjamin deemed it dangerous linguistic nihilism. But gossip-long derided and dismissed by writers and intellectuals-is far from frivolous. In Idle Talk, Deadly Talk, Ana Rodríguez Navas reveals gossip to be an urgent, utilitarian, and deeply... More


Do You Hear in the Mountains... and Other Stories
Maïssa Bey. Translated by Erin Lamm. Afterword by Alison Rice

This new translation brings together two of Algerian author Maïssa Bey’s important works for the first time in English. "Do You Hear in the Mountains..." is a compelling piece of autofiction in which three destinies meet dramatically on a train moving through France. We meet an Algerian refugee,... More


I Die by This Country
Fawzia Zouari. Translated by Skyler Artes

The first novel available to English readers by Fawzia Zouari, one of the most important North African authors writing today, begins with an emergency crew’s arrival at a Parisian apartment. Two emaciated young women, sisters, are brought out on stretchers. To the crowd of onlookers the women’s... More


Crossing the Line
Early Creole Novels and Anglophone Caribbean Culture in the Age of Emancipation Candace Ward

Crossing the Line examines a group of early nineteenth-century novels by white creoles, writers whose identities and perspectives were shaped by their experiences in Britain’s Caribbean colonies. Colonial subjects residing in the West Indian colonies "beyond the line," these writers were perceived... More


Staging Creolization
Women's Theater and Performance from the French Caribbean Emily Sahakian

In Staging Creolization, Emily Sahakian examines seven plays by Ina Césaire, Maryse Condé, Gerty Dambury, and Simone Schwarz-Bart that premiered in the French Caribbean or in France in the 1980s and 1990s and soon thereafter traveled to the United States. Sahakian argues that these late-twentieth-... More


A Cultural History of Underdevelopment
Latin America in the U.S. Imagination John Patrick Leary

A Cultural History of Underdevelopment explores the changing place of Latin America in U.S. culture from the mid-nineteenth century to the recent U.S.-Cuba détente. In doing so, it uncovers the complex ways in which Americans have imagined the global geography of poverty and progress, as the... More


American Imperialism's Undead
The Occupation of Haiti and the Rise of Caribbean Anticolonialism Raphael Dalleo

As modern Caribbean politics and literature emerged in the first half of the twentieth century, Haiti, as the region's first independent state, stood as a source of inspiration for imagining decolonization and rooting regional identity in Africanness. Yet at precisely the same moment that... More


In Search of Annie Drew
Jamaica Kincaid's Mother and Muse Daryl Cumber Dance

There is perhaps no other person who has been so often and obsessively featured in any writer’s canon as Jamaica Kincaid’s mother, Annie Drew. In this provocative new book, Daryl Dance argues that everything Kincaid has written, regardless of its apparent theme, actually relates to Kincaid’s... More


The Specter of Races
Latin American Anthropology and Literature between the Wars Anke Birkenmaier

Arguing that race has been the specter that has haunted many of the discussions about Latin American regional and national cultures today, Anke Birkenmaier shows how theories of race and culture in Latin America evolved dramatically in the period between the two world wars. In response to the rise... More


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