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African American Studies


The Segregated Scholars

Black Social Scientists and the Creation of Black Labor Studies, 1890–1950 Francille Rusan Wilson

In Segregated Scholars Francille Rusan Wilson explores the lives and work of fifteen black labor historians and social scientists as seen through the prisms of gender, class, and time. This collective biography offers complex and vital portraits of these seminal figures, many of whom knew and... More


Murder at Morija

Faith, Mystery, and Tragedy on an African Mission Tim Couzens

Just before Christmas in 1920, six people sat down to a meal at Morija, headquarters of the Paris Evangelical Missionary Society in Basutoland (Lesotho). All six were taken violently ill, and one of them died. They had been poisoned. The dead man was Édouard Jacottet, an eminent scholar and... More


From Morning To Night

Domestic Service at Maymont and the Gilded-Age South Elizabeth O'Leary

Step off the lush carpet and push through the swinging door of the butler’s pantry to enter the bustling realm of domestic workers at Maymont House from 1893 to 1925. In From Morning to Night, Elizabeth O’Leary takes the reader behind the scenes in the opulent mansion of the Richmond... More


Ceramic Uncles and Celluloid Mammies

Black Images and Their Influence on Culture Patricia A. Turner

Exploring white American popular culture of the past century and a half, Turner details subtle and not-so-subtle negative tropes and images of black people, from Uncle Tom and Aunt Jemima to jokes about Michael Jackson and Jesse Jackson. She feels that far too little has changed in terms of white... More


The Lynching of Emmett Till

A Documentary Narrative Christopher Metress

At 2:00 A.M. on August 28, 1955, fourteen-year-old Emmett Till, visiting from Chicago, was abducted from his great-uncle’s cabin in Money, Mississippi, and never seen alive again. When his battered and bloated corpse floated to the surface of the Tallahatchie River three days later and two local... More


Race Man

The Rise and Fall of the "Fighting Editor," John Mitchell Jr Ann Field Alexander

Although he has largely receded from the public consciousness, John Mitchell Jr., the editor and publisher of the Richmond Planet, was well known to many black, and not a few white, Americans in his day. A contemporary of Booker T. Washington, Mitchell contrasted sharply with Washington in... More


A Way out of No Way

Claiming Family and Freedom in the New South Dianne Swann-Wright

An African American folk saying declares, "Our God can make a way out of no way.... He can do anything but fail." When Dianne Swann-Wright set out to capture and relate the history of her ancestors—African Americans in central Virginia after the Civil War—she had to find that way, just as her... More


Rearing Wolves to Our Own Destruction

Slavery in Richmond Virginia, 1782–1865 Midori Takagi

RICHMOND WAS NOT only the capital of Virginia and of the Confederacy; it was also one of the most industrialized cities south of the Mason-Dixon Line. Boasting ironworks, tobacco processing plants, and flour mills, the city by 1860 drew half of its male workforce from the local slave population.... More


The Adventures of Amos 'n' Andy

A Social History of an American Phenomenon Melvin Patrick Ely

Forty million Americans indulged in a national obsession in 1930: they eagerly tuned in Amos 'n' Andy, the nightly radio comedy in which a pair of white actors portrayed the adventures of two black men making a new life in the big city. Meanwhile, some angry African Americans demanded that Amos 'n... More


From Calabar to Carter's Grove

The History of a Virginia Slave Community Lorena S. Walsh

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Forgotten Time

The Yazoo-Mississippi Delta after the Civil War John C. Willis

Although it came to epitomize the Cotton South in the twentieth century, the Yazoo-Mississippi Delta emerged as a distinct entity in the decades following the Civil War. As other southerners confronted the need to rebuild, the Delta remained mostly wilderness in 1865. Elsewhere, planters struggled... More


Leading the Race

The Transformation of the Black Elite in the Nation's Capital, 1880–1920 Jacqueline M. Moore

Historians of the African American experience after Reconstruction have tended to imply that the black elite served only their own interests, that their exclusive control of black institutions precluded efforts to improve the status of African Americans in general. In Leading the Race, Jacqueline M... More


Rituals of Race

American Public Culture and the Search for Racial Democracy Alessandra Lorini

In this sophisticated study of the struggle for African American human rights in America, Alessandra Lorini examines public events in New York City from the end of the Civil War through World War I, demonstrating how ritualized elements of black processions, parades, riots, and festivals made... More


Slave in A Box

The Strange Career of Aunt Jemima Maurice M. Manring

The figure of the mammy occupies a central place in the lore of the Old South and has long been used to ullustrate distinct social phenomena, including racial oppression and class identity. In the early twentieth century, the mammy became immortalized as Aunt Jemima, the spokesperson for a line of... More


Enterprising Southerners

Black Economic Success in North Carolina 1865-1915 Robert C. Kenzer

Surprisingly, there existed a small population of southern blacks who experienced economic gains in the fifty years following the Civil War. This book examines the characteristics of North Carolina’s African-American population in order to explain the social and political factors that shaped... More


Before Freedom Came

African-American Life in the Antebellum South Edward D. C. Campbell, Jr. and Kim S. Rice, eds.

[Book description not available]


A New Plantation South

Land, Labor, and Federal Favor in Twentieth-Century Arkansas Jeannie M. Whayne

Jeannie M. Whayne traces the emergence of a transformed southern plantation system in the Arkansas delta decades after the end of the Civil War. By manipulating laws and federal and state agencies to gain control over land policy, Poinsett County planters fought to maintain their place on the land... More


Virginia Landmarks of Black History

Sites on the Virginia Landmarks Register and the National Register of Historic Places Calder Loth, ed.

The 64 sites described in this book are a testament to the contribution that African-Americans have made to Virginia history over the last four centuries. The buildings they constructed, the churches in which they worshiped and the schools in they studies preserve the story of these contributions.


Sterling A. Brown

Building the Black Aesthetic Tradition Joanne V. Gabbin

Sterling A. Brown's achievement and influence in the field of American literature and culture are unquestionably significant. His poetry has been translated into Spanish, French, German, and Russian and has been read in literary circles throughout the world. He is also one of the principal... More


Anthropology and Africa

Changing Perspectives on a Changing Scene Sally Falk Moore

No one working in Africa today or studying Africa in any discipline whatever can afford to ignore the anthropological literature. It has long been the foundational background for a variety of African studies. However, there has never been a succinct historical description of the way the Africanist... More


Cultivation and Culture

Labor and the Shaping of Slave Life in the Americas Ira Berlin and Philip D. Morgan, eds.

So central was labor in the lives of African-American slaves that it has often been taken for granted, with little attention given to the type of work that slaves did and the circumstances surrounding it. Cultivation and Culture brings together leading scholars of slavery- historians,... More


The Color of Their Skin

Education and Race in Richmond, Virginia, 1954–89 Robert A. Pratt

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Power and the Praise Poem

Leroy Vail and Landeg White

[Book description not available]


Freedom Summer

Sally Belfrage

Freedom Summer is a richly detailed account of a young white woman who participated in the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee's summer project in Mississippi in 1964. The text covers one intense summer from the basic training session in June to the Democratic Convention in August.


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