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Early Republic


The Papers of George Washington
Revolutionary War Series, vol. 4April-June 1776 George Washington. Edited by W. W. Abbot and Dorothy Twohig

Volume 4 completes the documentary record of Washington's first year as commander in chief of the Continental army. It opens with his final preparations to leave Cambridge following the successful siege of Boston and concludes with news that General William Howe's British army was soon to arrive at... More


Citizens of a Common Intellectual Homeland
The Transatlantic Origins of American Democracy and Nationhood Armin Mattes

Notions of democracy and nationhood constitute the pivotal legacy of the American Revolution, but to understand their development one must move beyond a purely American context. Citizens of a Common Intellectual Homeland explores the simultaneous emergence of modern concepts of democracy and the... More


The Papers of George Washington
1 April-30 September 1795 George Washington. Edited by Carol S. Ebel

International issues occupy much of Washington's attention in volume 18 of the Presidential Series, which covers 1 April through 30 September 1795. Peace agreements were made with Morocco in August and with Algiers in September. Thomas Pinckney traveled to Spain to renew negotiations over use of... More


The Papers of James Madison
July 1814-18 February 1815 James Madison. Edited by Angela Kreider, J. C. A. Stagg, Anne Mandeville Colony, Katharine E. Harbury, and Mary Parke Johnson

Volume 8 of the Presidential Series covers the suspense-filled final months of the War of 1812, as Madison awaited the outcome of peace negotiations at Ghent while defending the country against British invasion, warding off government bankruptcy, and preparing to meet armed resistance in New... More


Between Sovereignty and Anarchy
The Politics of Violence in the American Revolutionary Era Edited by Patrick Griffin, Robert G. Ingram, Peter S. Onuf, and Brian Schoen

Between Sovereignty and Anarchy considers the conceptual and political problem of violence in the early modern Anglo-Atlantic, charting an innovative approach to the history of the American Revolution. Its editors and contributors contend that existing scholarship on the Revolution largely ignores... More


Dunmore's New World
The Extraordinary Life of a Royal Governor in Revolutionary America--with Jacobites, Counterfeiters, Land Schemes, Shipwrecks, Scalping, Indian Politics, Runaway Slaves, and Two Illegal Royal Weddings James Corbett David

Dunmore's New World tells the stranger-than-fiction story of Lord Dunmore, the last royal governor of Virginia, whose long-neglected life boasts a measure of scandal and intrigue rare in the annals of the colonial world. Dunmore not only issued the first formal proclamation of emancipation in... More


Sons of the Father
George Washington and His Protégés Edited by Robert M. S. McDonald

Whether acting as a military officer or civilian officeholder, George Washington did not possess a reputation for glad handing, easy confidences, or even much warmth. His greatest attributes as a commander might well have been his firm command over his own emotions and the way in which he held... More


Amelioration and Empire
Progress and Slavery in the Plantation Americas Christa Dierksheide

Christa Dierksheide argues that "enlightened" slaveowners in the British Caribbean and the American South, neither backward reactionaries nor freedom-loving hypocrites, thought of themselves as modern, cosmopolitan men with a powerful alternative vision of progress in the Atlantic world. Instead of... More


The True Geography of Our Country
Jefferson’s Cartographic Vision Joel Kovarsky

A philosopher, architect, astronomer, and polymath, Thomas Jefferson lived at a time when geography was considered the "mother of all sciences." Although he published only a single printed map, Jefferson was also regarded as a geographer, owing to his interest in and use of geographic and... More


Cosmopolitan Patriots
Americans in Paris in the Age of Revolution Philipp Ziesche

This truly transnational history reveals the important role of Americans abroad in the Age of Revolution, as well as providing an early example of the limits of American influence on other nations. From the beginning of the French Revolution to its end at the hands of Napoleon, American... More


Collegiate Republic
Cultivating an Ideal Society in Early America Margaret Sumner

Collegiate Republic offers a compellingly different view of the first generation of college communities founded after the American Revolution. Such histories have usually taken the form of the institutional tale, charting the growth of a single institution and the male minds within it. Focusing on... More


Era of Experimentation
American Political Practices in the Early Republic Daniel Peart

In Era of Experimentation, Daniel Peart challenges the pervasive assumption that the present-day political system, organized around two competing parties, represents the logical fulfillment of participatory democracy. Recent accounts of "the rise of American democracy" between the Revolution and... More


Humboldt and Jefferson
A Transatlantic Friendship of the Enlightenment Sandra Rebok

Humboldt and Jefferson explores the relationship between two fascinating personalities: the Prussian explorer, scientist, and geographer Alexander von Humboldt (1769–1859) and the American statesman, architect, and naturalist Thomas Jefferson (1743–1826). In the wake of his famous expedition... More


The Great Virginia Triumvirate
George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, and James Madison in the Eyes of Their Contemporaries John P. Kaminski

As the largest, oldest, and wealthiest of the original thirteen colonies, Virginia played a central role in the fight for independence and as a state in the new republic. This importance is reflected in the number of Virginians who filled key national leadership positions. Three remarkable... More


The Citizenship Revolution
Politics and the Creation of the American Union, 1774-1804 Douglas Bradburn

Most Americans believe that the ratification of the Constitution in 1788 marked the settlement of post-Revolutionary disputes over the meanings of rights, democracy, and sovereignty in the new nation. In The Citizenship Revolution, Douglas Bradburn undercuts this view by showing that the Union, not... More


A Warring Nation
Honor, Race, and Humiliation in America and Abroad Bertram Wyatt-Brown

In this culminating work of a long and distinguished career, historian Bertram Wyatt-Brown looks at the theme of honor—a subject on which he was the acknowledged expert—and places it in a broader historical and cultural context than ever before.Wyatt-Brown begins with the contention that honor... More


Paine and Jefferson in the Age of Revolutions
Edited by Simon P. Newman and Peter S. Onuf

The enormous popularity of his pamphlet Common Sense made Thomas Paine one of the best-known patriots during the early years of American independence. His subsequent service with the Continental Army, his publication of The American Crisis (1776–83), and his work with Pennsylvania’s revolutionary... More


The Papers of George Washington
1 October 1794-31 March 1795 George Washington. Edited by David R. Hoth and Carol S. Ebel

The highlight events of the months from October 1794 through March 1795, the period documented by volume 17 of the Presidential Series, were the suppression of the Whiskey Insurrection in western Pennsylvania and the negotiation of the Jay Treaty with Great Britain.The volume opens with Washington... More


James Madison's "Advice to My Country"
Edited by David B. Mattern

Here is a ready reference to Madison’s thought, including his most perceptive observations on government and human nature. The compendium brings together excerpts from his writings on a variety of political and social issues, ranging from agriculture to free trade, from religion and the state to... More


Whispers of Rebellion
Narrating Gabriel's Conspiracy Michael L. Nicholls

An ambitious but abortive plan to revolt that ended in the conviction and hanging of over two dozen men, Gabriel’s Conspiracy of 1800 sought nothing less than to capture the capital city of Richmond and end slavery in Virginia. Whispers of Rebellion draws on recent scholarship and extensive... More


Selected Journals of Caroline Healey Dall
Caroline Healey Dall. Edited by Helen R. Deese

This second volume of selections from Caroline Healey Dall’s diary extends her story into the crucial period of her central role in the American women’s movement and her position as a founder of the American Social Science Association. These entries convey the Civil War, the tragedy of Lincoln’s... More


The Selected Papers of John Jay
1782–1784 John Jay. Edited by Elizabeth M. Nuxoll

This volume opens in June 1782 with the arrival of John Jay in Paris to join Benjamin Franklin in negotiation of the peace treaty with Great Britain. Exploring Jay’s controversial insistence on British recognition of American independence prior to the opening of negotiations and his disregard of... More


Thomas Jefferson's Granddaughter in Queen Victoria's England
The Travel Diary of Ellen Wayles Coolidge, 1838–1839 Ellen Wayles Coolidge. Edited by Ann Lucas Birle and Lisa A. Francavilla

Ellen Wayles Coolidge arrived in London in June 1838 at the advent of Queen Victoria’s reign—the citizens were still celebrating the coronation. During her nine-month stay, Coolidge kept a diary that reveals the uncommon education of her youth, when she lived and studied at Monticello with her... More


The Papers of James Madison
1 February 1820-26 February 1823 James Madison. Edited by David B. Mattern, J. C. A. Stagg, Mary Parke Johnson, and Anne Mandeville Colony

The Papers of James Madison project, housed at the University of Virginia, was established in 1956 to publish annotated volumes of the correspondence and writings of James Madison, the Virginia statesman most often remembered for his public service as "Father of the Constitution" and as fourth... More


State and Citizen
British America and the Early United States Edited by Peter Thompson and Peter S. Onuf

Pointing the way to a new history of the transformation of British subjects into American citizens, State and Citizen challenges the presumption that the early American state was weak by exploring the changing legal and political meaning of citizenship. The volume’s distinguished contributors cast... More


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