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Early Republic


Culture and Liberty in the Age of the American Revolution
Michal Jan Rozbicki

In his new book, Michal Jan Rozbicki undertakes to bridge the gap between the political and the cultural histories of the American Revolution. Through a careful examination of liberty as both the ideological axis and the central metaphor of the age, he is able to offer a fresh model for... More


With the Hammer of Truth
James Thomson Callender and America's Early National Heroes Michael Durey

James Thomson Callender earned an infamous reputation as one of the first muckraking journalists in America, resulting largely from his character assassinations of George Washington, John Adams, Alexander Hamilton, and Thomas Jefferson. As the journalist who broke the story of Jefferson's suppossed... More


Gabriel's Conspiracy
A Documentary History Edited by Philip J. Schwarz

The plans for a large slave rebellion in the Richmond area in 1800, orchestrated by a literate enslaved blacksmith named Gabriel, leaked out before they could be executed, and he and twenty-five other enslaved people were hanged. In reaction to the plot, the Virginia and other legislatures passed... More


His Soul Goes Marching On
Responses to John Brown and the Harpers Ferry Raid Edited by Paul Finkelman

An examination of responses to John Brown and the Harper's Ferry Raid by prominent scholars: what different segments of American society made of Brown's attempt to foment a slave rebellion and his subsequent trial and execution.


Freedom Has a Face
Race, Identity, and Community in Jefferson's Virginia Kirt von Daacke

In his examination of a wide array of court papers from Albemarle County, a rural Virginia slaveholding community, Kirt von Daacke argues against the commonly held belief that southern whites saw free blacks only as a menace. Von Daacke reveals instead a more easygoing interracial social order in... More


New Views of New England
Studies in Material and Visual Culture, 1680-1830 Edited by Martha J. McNamara and Georgia B. Barnhill

Beautifully illustrated, this collection of essays will introduce the reader to a rich, surprising, thought-provoking, and entirely new view of early New England. Eleven essays written by historians, archaeologists, art and architectural historians, and literary scholars recast our understanding of... More


The Mind of Thomas Jefferson
Peter S. Onuf

In The Mind of Thomas Jefferson, one of the foremost historians of Jefferson and his time, Peter S. Onuf, offers a collection of essays that seeks to historicize one of our nation’s founding fathers. Challenging current attempts to appropriate Jefferson to serve all manner of contemporary political... More


A Separate Civil War
Communities in Conflict in the Mountain South Jonathan Dean Sarris

Most Americans think of the Civil War as a series of dramatic clashes between massive armies led by romantic-seeming leaders. But in the Appalachian communities of North Georgia, things were very different. Focusing on Fannin and Lumpkin counties in the Blue Ridge Mountains along Georgia’s northern... More


Civil War Talks
Further Reminiscences of George S. Bernard and His Fellow Veterans George S. Bernard. Edited by Hampton Newsome, John Horn, and John G. Selby

George S. Bernard was a Petersburg lawyer and member of the 12th Virginia Infantry Regiment during the Civil War. Over the course of his life, Bernard wrote extensively about his wartime experiences and collected accounts from other veterans. In 1892, he published War Talks of Confederate Veterans... More


A Political Nation
New Directions in Mid-Nineteenth-Century American Political History Edited by Gary W. Gallagher and Rachel A. Shelden

This impressive collection joins the recent outpouring of exciting new work on American politics and political actors in the mid-nineteenth century. For several generations, much of the scholarship on the political history of the period from 1840 to 1877 has carried a theme of failure; after all,... More


The Papers of Francis Bernard
Governor of Colonial Massachusetts, 1760–1769 Francis Bernard. Edited by Colin Nicolson

The second volume of The Papers of Francis Bernard records the reaction of the royal governor of colonial Massachusetts to the tumultuous events surrounding the passage of the Stamp Act in 1765. Because the response to the new legislation in Boston set the pattern for the reaction of all the other... More


The Selected Papers of John Jay
1780–1782 John Jay. edited by Elizabeth M. Nuxoll

The second volume of The Selected Papers of John Jay opens in January 1780 with Jay’s arrival in Spain on his first diplomatic mission abroad. It ends in June 1782 with his departure for France to join Benjamin Franklin in negotiating a peace treaty with Great Britain. Jay’s mission in Spain was to... More


The Papers of James Madison
25 October 1813-30 June 1814 James Madison. Edited by Angela Kreider, J. C. A. Stagg, Mary Parke Johnson, Anne Mandeville Colony, and Katharine E. Harbury

The Papers of James Madison project, housed at the University of Virginia, was established in 1956 to publish annotated volumes of the correspondence and writings of James Madison, the Virginia statesman most often remembered for his public service as "Father of the Constitution" and as fourth... More


The Constitution before the Judgment Seat
The Prehistory and Ratification of the American Constitution, 1787–1791 Jürgen Heideking. Edited by John P. Kaminski and Richard Leffler

Originally published in German in 1988, the late Jürgen Heideking's exhaustive study of the debates over the ratification of the U.S. Constitution compares the methods used to call state ratifying conventions and explores everything that made up the ratification debate, from town meetings and... More


The Nation's Nature
How Continental Presumptions Gave Rise to the United States of America James D. Drake

In one of Common Sense’s most ringing phrases, Thomas Paine declared it "absurd" for "a continent to be perpetually governed by an island." Such powerful words, coupled with powerful ideas, helped spur the United States to independence.In The Nation's Nature, James D. Drake examines how a... More


The Enemy Within
Fears of Corruption in the Civil War North Michael Thomas Smith

Stoked by a series of major scandals, popular fears of corruption in the Civil War North provide a unique window into Northern culture in the Civil War era. In The Enemy Within, Michael Thomas Smith relates these scandals—including those involving John C. Frémont’s administration in Missouri,... More


The Diaries of Gouverneur Morris
European Travels, 1794–1798 Gouverneur Morris. Edited by Melanie Randolph Miller

In October 1794, Gouverneur Morris, Jefferson’s successor as American minister to France, left Paris forever. A friend of George Washington and a major contributor to the American Constitution, Morris had witnessed the igniting of the French Revolution, the fall of the old regime, and the plunge... More


The Papers of George Washington
1 May-30 September 1794 George Washington. Edited by David R. Hoth and Carol S. Ebel

During the spring and summer of 1794, Washington and his cabinet faced concerns that arose from the ongoing war in Europe. Embargo evasions, activities of French and British privateers, and the formation of a league of armed neutrality by Denmark and Sweden required appropriate administrative... More


The Madisons at Montpelier
Reflections on the Founding Couple Ralph Ketcham

Restored to its original splendor, Montpelier is now a national shrine, but before Montpelier became a place of study and tribute, it was a home. Often kept from it by the business of the young nation, James and Dolley Madison could finally take up permanent residence when they retired from... More


Civil War Sites in Virginia
A Tour Guide James I. Robertson, Jr., and Brian Steel Wills

Since 1982, the renowned Civil War historian James I. "Bud" Robertson’s Civil War Sites in Virginia: A Tour Guide has enlightened and informed Civil War enthusiasts and scholars alike. The book expertly explores the commonwealth’s Civil War sites for those hoping to gain greater insight and... More


Alexis de Tocqueville and Gustave de Beaumont in America
Their Friendship and Their Travels Alexis de Tocqueville. Edited by Olivier Zunz. Translated by Arthur Goldhammer

Alexis de Tocqueville, a young aristocrat of twenty-five, worried deeply about the future of France as well as his own fate in his native country, which had just experienced its second revolution in less than fifty years. Along with Gustave de Beaumont, a fellow magistrate, Tocqueville conceived... More


Transient and Permanent
The Transcendentalist Movement and Its Contexts Edited by Charles Capper and Conrad Edick Wright

Comprising twenty essays by leading scholars, this insightful collection provides the best recent writing on the Transcendentalists, the New England religious reformers and intellectuals who challenged both spiritual and secular orthodoxies between the 1830s and the 1850s. The volume addresses... More


A Young Virginia Boatman Navigates the Civil War
The Journals of George Randolph Wood George Randolph Wood. Edited by Will Molineux. Introduction by Scott Nelson

George Randolph Wood filled several journal books with personal remembrances of life in nineteenth-century Hampton, Virginia; particularly of his experiences aboard river and canal boats transporting supplies for Confederate troops along the James River during the Civil War. Wood wrote about his... More


Jefferson, Lincoln, and Wilson
The American Dilemma of Race and Democracy Edited by John Milton Cooper, Jr., and Thomas J. Knock

Jefferson, Lincoln, and Wilson: The American Dilemma of Race and Democracy seeks to explore how the collision of races shaped American democracy in the lives, thought, and actions of three of the nation’s most important presidents. Each of them led the nation in a different epoch, during times... More


Seeing Jefferson Anew
In His Time and Ours edited by John B. Boles and Randal L. Hall

Thomas Jefferson’s ideas have been so important in shaping the character and aspirations of the United States that it has proven impossible to think about the state of the nation at almost any moment without implicit or explicit reference to his words and actions. In similar fashion, each... More


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